#1
In John 5´s Blues Ball song of the album Songs for Sanity around 0:40 and on there is a solo. What kinda scales are he using there? I hear Buckethead use them a lot too, and they don´t sound like any ordinary scale.

Please help, I would love to play like that.
Guitars:
- Gibson SG Standard
- Lag Roxane 500
- Eastwood Hi-Flyer
- Takamine EG523

Amplifiers:
- Jet City JCA50H
- George Dennis 60Watt The Blue Combo
- Marshall SuperBass 100Watt
#2
Minor pentatonic, with a whole lot of accidentals.

And now you know everything you need to know to play like that.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
Accidentals?
Guitars:
- Gibson SG Standard
- Lag Roxane 500
- Eastwood Hi-Flyer
- Takamine EG523

Amplifiers:
- Jet City JCA50H
- George Dennis 60Watt The Blue Combo
- Marshall SuperBass 100Watt
#4
Quote by Tim the Rocker
Accidentals?



Notes not in the scale ....

If I am riffing in A minor and I play a B flat -- that's an accidental -- it's part of a different scale (harmonic minor) but I'm borrowing it for a little bit.

If I play Eb over an A minor riff, I am hitting an accidental (it's often known as the "blue note" because it is common in blues).


Basically the black keys on a piano are accidentals for C major and A minor.

If you move to a different key -- say F major or D minor, B flat is part of the key, B natural is an accidental in that key.

So -- learn what a key is. Learn major and minor scales and how every major scale has a relative minor scale. Learn what sort of accidentals musicians slip in to solos to add flavor.
#5
Quote by Zen Skin
Notes not in the scale ....

If I am riffing in A minor and I play a B flat -- that's an accidental -- it's part of a different scale (harmonic minor) but I'm borrowing it for a little bit.



Wut?