#1
So I know that there is no way that this is possibly true; I'm not even close to being able to play over progressions like Blues For Alice and some of the harder Real Book charts. But lately, I just can't help but feel like I don't know what to do next. I've transcribed many different players solos on a plethora of different tunes, I've worked through a lot of the Joe Pass book, and transposed a lot of his exercises to different keys and played them in different positions. I've spent a great deal of time playing freely over backing tracks every day, I've played scales and arpeggios in all keys etc, played scale sequences (groups of 3, groups of 4, moving up and down in 3rds) etc........

I'm not trying to say that I've done everything there is to practice on guitar; I'm just saying I've done enough to where I'm really stumped on how to keep progressing. Its to the point where when I pick up my guitar every day, I don't even know what to do, because I feel like doing more transcribing, or more scales or more Joe Pass stuff is just back-tracking on old material. And its been so long since anything has felt new on the instrument; I can't even remember the last time I had one of those nights where I just spent hours on a new solo, or transcription, and just been unable to break away from it.

So, if somebody else has experienced this...What got you through it?
I couldn't think of a thing that I hope tomorrow brings
#2
different things all the time u gotta find something to inspire u. movies, guitar store, w/e.
#3
you could... you know...write your own songs.
What?! There's a clean channel on my amp?!

Quote by GoodOl'trashbag
omfg i totally forgot about that, you sir are jesus christ.
#4
Quote by thegloaming
So I know that there is no way that this is possibly true; I'm not even close to being able to play over progressions like Blues For Alice and some of the harder Real Book charts. But lately, I just can't help but feel like I don't know what to do next. I've transcribed many different players solos on a plethora of different tunes, I've worked through a lot of the Joe Pass book, and transposed a lot of his exercises to different keys and played them in different positions. I've spent a great deal of time playing freely over backing tracks every day, I've played scales and arpeggios in all keys etc, played scale sequences (groups of 3, groups of 4, moving up and down in 3rds) etc........

I'm not trying to say that I've done everything there is to practice on guitar; I'm just saying I've done enough to where I'm really stumped on how to keep progressing. Its to the point where when I pick up my guitar every day, I don't even know what to do, because I feel like doing more transcribing, or more scales or more Joe Pass stuff is just back-tracking on old material. And its been so long since anything has felt new on the instrument; I can't even remember the last time I had one of those nights where I just spent hours on a new solo, or transcription, and just been unable to break away from it.

So, if somebody else has experienced this...What got you through it?


Take a break from practicing, and start playing!

(and/or writing as has been suggested)

Ask yourself this...." what do I feel like playing"?

Play the crap out it and have fun.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Apr 29, 2011,
#5
Try broadening your horizons by listening to new genres of music, particularly slightly more technical music - whether its fingerstyle acoustic, progressive metal, jazz fusion, whatever takes your fancy - that will prove a challenge.

It will be hard at first, but you can really develop yourself and your tastes by giving it a try with an open mind.
#6
Maybe you need to practice improv more? Maybe try getting a band together or something.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#7
Yeah, just play. Play along to your favorite songs and try to improvise over them, but recreate the feeling you feel, because that's the strongest type of playing.
You gotta have feeling...emotional content, or other wise it's just sound.

I would also try different styles and different instruments. Learning Jazz or Electronic music is great. I like learning Miles Davis riffs because it teaches you to play with breathe and space, because musicians who play with their lungs have to take breath so they learn to play with the silence, as opposed to a guitarist who can play forever. Electronic music like Aphex Twin, Daft Punk, Autechre and Squarepusher have really great melodies and multiple melodies that are really different from the kinds that guitarists play, so it really broadens your pallet, so you're not just using your bluesy riffs but something that's different, melodically.

Also, I would check out Paul Gilberts videos, even if you're not in to shredding, he is by far one of the greatest teachers I've ever encountered.

I'd also look up Steve Vai's 30 hour workout, there's a ton of useful tips in there, even if you don't do the whole routine. He has some great lessons on his website as well.

There's also a ton of torrents that have music books like fake books and books on counterpoints and harmony and all sorts of stuff.

You could try taking up learning how to read sheet music, if you don't already.

Even taking a break from guitar is healthy, sometimes I find a day away inspires new things the next time I pick up my guitar.

One last thing... when trying to learn a song or something, dont just try to learn the notes, because something I've gained through ear training and just picking up stuff the more I play guitar (like being able to tell that someone is playing an open chord as opposed to a barre chord, or how they attack the strings), you have to get the sound and the feel too, that's whats important. The sustain, the attack, the grit, the fluidity and how clean or how sloppy something is, those things are just important.

Also, make sure you practice with a metronome, most guitarists don't think they need one and when they try to practice with one they find it extremely hard, but it's extremely useful.
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#8
Go out and jamm dude!
its what i do when i need to take a break from practicing.



Quote by Gunpowder
Thrashturbating? Most metal of all ways to pleasure oneself.
#9
Paralysis by analysis!


It's not a bad idea to take a break from the heavy Real Book stuff and have some fun, as people have said. Another option is find a serious jazz teacher that will get you inspired. Perhaps record something tat you've arranged and get focused on that for a bit. Maybe play some Beatles for a change .. or someone you find fun but not overly technical.

I'm sort of where you are in terms of working out jazz and getting a little daunted. I decided to learn some Paul Simon tunes and have some fun ... those are songs I like that can be complex or just melodic and cool. What would be the equivalent for you?
#10
Take a theoretical issue which you do not now or haven't practiced or a theoretical concept which you did practice and implement them on standard tunes. always practice how to implement what you have learn on tunes don't practice stuff with out a context of tunes. you learn scales - learn how to implement them in your improv, new voicings use them when comping etc