#1
Hey, I love my Gibson Les Paul Standard, but I was thinking of getting a strat, but I can't stand the necks on them and didn't fancy getting a lower end one or spending a fortune. So I thought about installing coil tap on my Les Paul. How much would this cost? Would I have to replace the current pickups? Would it affect the sound of the humbuckers (when not split) and will it require drilling any holes? Thanks!
#3
Some humbuckers all ready have the potential to be spilt with out needing them to be repalced, if this is true there should be 4 wires for each humbucker. to install the coil tap you would need to purcahse and new pot with a push pull switch, so no drilling holes is needed. are they standard pick ups?
#4
The ability to coil tap depends on how many conductor wires your pickup has. You need 4 to tap, some only have 2. You will also need some kind of switch to activate the tap. Some people use a push-pull knob, others use toggle switches. Entirely up to you.

It wont sound like a Strat, it never will. It will sound like a Les Paul with a single coil. A coil tap isn't an express train to Fender-land.
#5
Quote by Seref
The ability to coil tap depends on how many conductor wires your pickup has. You need 4 to tap, some only have 2. You will also need some kind of switch to activate the tap. Some people use a push-pull knob, others use toggle switches. Entirely up to you.

It wont sound like a Strat, it never will. It will sound like a Les Paul with a single coil. A coil tap isn't an express train to Fender-land.

Yeah, sorry, I worded it wrong. I can get my Les Paul to sound slightly similar to a strat anyway. I wasn't trying to get a strat's sound in my les paul, just add to it's versatility. The pickups in my guitar are currently Gibson Burstbuckers.
#6
The cost would vary, depending on what you wanted done.

The question on replacing your current pickups would depend on how they're wired right now. If they are 5 wire, or 4 wire (and some may be 3 wire) then no problem. I've never owned a Gibson so I have no clue about their stock pickups. Hopefully someone else knows, and could fill you in. You could check by opening the control cavity. If the main wire coming from each of your pickups has two wires soldered together, then you're good to go. But if it only has a hot going to each pickup's respective volume pot and a ground then you either need to replace them or replace the wire

No, It wouldn't affect the sound of the humbuckers when not split (unless you used push-pull pots of a different value than the stock pot ie replacing a 500k pot with a 250k push-pull pot)

If you use Push-pull pots, as mentioned above, it won't require any additional drilling. What they are, they are basically a regular potentiometer with a double pole switch "piggybacking." Rather than drilling a hole to mount a miniswitch, It fits into the space that one of your pots is in now. It's switching is performed by pulling up on the shaft.

The wiring isn't really that complex. It's easy enough to learn yourself if you take your time with it.

You may also consider replacing the standard 3 way Gibson switch with a 4 way, 5 way, or 6 way rotary switch, although that's a bit trickier than using push-pull pots.


If you wanted to go REALLY all out with the coil tapping, you could get a pair of on-on-on switches. Regular miniswitches and push-pull pots are "on-on." Meaning that you have the choice of having both coils on (full humbucker) or only one coil on (coil split.) Which coil gets left on and which one gets muted is dependant on which wires you solder the the hot lug and ground lug. Basically, with a regular switch you have either both coils, or one of the other. With an "on-on-on" switch you have the choice of going full humbucker, outer coil, or inner coil. With a Les Paul like yours, this would give you a total of FIFTEEN* possible pickup combinations to choose from!


*Counted different? Here's my list

Full = Full Humbucker
Adj = Adjustable Coil (Outer)
Slug = Slug Coil (Inner)

bridge full neck full
bridge full
bridge adj
bridge slug
neck full
neck adj
neck slug
bridge full neck adj
bridge full neck slug
bridge adj neck full
bridge adj neck adj
bridge adj neck slug
bridge slug neck full
bridge slug neck adj
bridge slug neck slug
#7
I'd recommend with a coil tap and phase reversal wiring (http://www.guitarelectronics.com/c=NTQkh4R1Vs2f0MlLyQ4qy9nI5/product/WD2HH3T22_03/Guitar-Diagram-Gibson-reverse-phase-dual-coil-tap-View-Download-Free). You can get a sorta Strat sound in the middle position using the phase reversal. However, that wiring will require tappable pickups (4 wire), which I don't know if the Burstbuckers are. If not, you'd have to buy some new pickups too.
#8
I did it on mine once, and it wasn't as good or versatile as I thought... defiantly not a strat like sound.

I ended up switching back.

I know it sounds like a really good idea, but in my experience it wasn't as good as I thought.
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#9
But if it's switchable, then it's something you can select when you want it. I currently have it wired permanently on my Les Paul, but that wasn't on purpose, the Seymour Duncan pickup I used is reversed phase from every other pickup I've used. I may put a push-pull pot in eventually to allow me to switch the phase since it does sound good for some songs.
#10
My Mann rebuild has a lot of switches, ala jimmypage wiring (4 push pulls). None of them sound like a strat to me, but its kinda fun to have 42 options on one guitar, even though I dont know what to do with them. The soldering took longer than I expected. I didnt use a jig to hold them so I wobbled a lot, I'd suggest making a jig unless you have three hands. You can get a shop to do it for you, but they will charge a bundle. Four switches is less than $20.
#11
Depends on if your pickups are 4 wire, if not they'll have to be replaced or modded (Jim made a tut on this). IF they're 4 wire, the cheapest way would be to swap a knob for push/pull and have it set to split the coil.
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