#1
Hello all.
I'd like to share with you what chord progressions I've studied so far.
For The Love Of God : Intro chord progression :Eminadd9 E/Fmaj.
This works because they both resolve to each other.
The add9 (Gb) will have a tendency to go to the Fmajor chord and the E/Fmaj wants to get back because it has a drone and F wants to go back in E because the mode is Phrygian and then you should want to let it resolve to Emin, I guess.
Hand On Heart: Fmaj-Emaj-Emaj-Fmaj-Bsus2-A :
This works because first you have The IV and V both which resolve nicely into 1, then you get the Bsus2 or the I chord.
The A is the neapolitan chord of the relative minor of B maj.
Note me if anything is wrong in this.
These are both Steve Vai songs.
I will keep updating this thread.
#2
Quote by Xiaoxi
As with all functional harmony, this can be relative; N of not only I, but also ii, iii, IV, V, and vi in the major key and their corresponding positions in minor.

Quote by liampje

The A is the neapolitan chord of the relative minor of B maj.

Forgive me, for I have created a monster.

...modes and scales are still useless.


Quote by PhoenixGRM
Hey guys could you spare a minute to Vote for my band. Go to the site Search our band Listana with CTRL+F for quick and vote Thank you .
Quote by sam b
Voted for Patron Çıldırdı.

Thanks
Quote by PhoenixGRM
But our Band is Listana
#3
Quote by liampje

I will keep updating this thread.


right lads, i'm off to the barn, to hang myself.

btw, troll. look at his thread count, this is his 100th thread.
#4
I guess this is what you get if you throw lots of random things together without understanding them.

liampje, in this thread https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1437150 , given the chord progression of Dm, C, Gm, you suggested that the scale to play over it was:

"Dminor G minor.
Both of these works.
Notice how the characteristics change as you move from G minor to D minor in your soloing."

Now this indicates that you can't even find the key of a simple, 3 chord progression, let alone analyse a Vai song. You need to go back to the start.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
Quote by AlanHB
I guess this is what you get if you throw lots of random things together without understanding them.

liampje, in this thread https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1437150 , given the chord progression of Dm, C, Gm, you suggested that the scale to play over it was:

"Dminor G minor.
Both of these works.
Notice how the characteristics change as you move from G minor to D minor in your soloing."

Now this indicates that you can't even find the key of a simple, 3 chord progression, let alone analyse a Vai song. You need to go back to the start.

Yes and can't you look a little bit further.
Because I said I made a mistake.
#6
Quote by liampje
Yes and can't you look a little bit further.
Because I said I made a mistake.


just cos you acknowledge it doesn't mean you got it right or understood it.
Last edited by gavk at Apr 29, 2011,
#8
I think the biggest thing you are failing to understand is the cohesiveness of a tonal center. You can't just explain a chord by saying it's a Neapolitan chord of a key that the song isn't in.

The "add9" of an Emadd9 chord is F#, not Gb.

I also don't know what E/Fmaj is. The chord/note after the slash is the bass. So if you have an F major chord over an E bass note, that's F/E (or Fmaj/E if you want to add that "maj" in there).

Also, For the Love of God is in E minor, therefore Emadd9 doesn't "resolve" to F/E. The tonic chord can't "resolve" to a chord other than the tonic. You could have an Esus resolve to an E, but you can't have a I resolve to a bII.

Here's my analysis for For the Love of God:
Emadd9 - tonic.
F/E - bII over a tonic pedal.
That's it. Obviously there's more to the voiceleading, but that's mostly just the idea that a bII over a tonic pedal resolves very strongly back to the tonic. This because, quite frankly, it's a bII and it's over a tonic pedal. To add a little more analysis to that, bII contains three tensions. But honestly, that's about all you can say.

As for Hand Over Heart, you said Fmaj instead of F#maj (presumably by mistake), and your analysis is all off. It's actually mostly in F#, not B. B does sound like the tonic when it's played, but that's only temporary. Everything else suggests F#.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Apr 29, 2011,
#10
Quote by food1010
I think the biggest thing you are failing to understand is the cohesiveness of a tonal center. You can't just explain a chord by saying it's a Neapolitan chord of a key that the song isn't in.

The "add9" of an Emadd9 chord is F#, not Gb.

I also don't know what E/Fmaj is. The chord/note after the slash is the bass. So if you have an F major chord over an E bass note, that's F/E (or Fmaj/E if you want to add that "maj" in there).

Also, For the Love of God is in E minor, therefore Emadd9 doesn't "resolve" to F/E. The tonic chord can't "resolve" to a chord other than the tonic. You could have an Esus resolve to an E, but you can't have a I resolve to a bII.

Here's my analysis for For the Love of God:
Emadd9 - tonic.
F/E - bII over a tonic pedal.
That's it. Obviously there's more to the voiceleading, but that's mostly just the idea that a bII over a tonic pedal resolves very strongly back to the tonic. This because, quite frankly, it's a bII and it's over a tonic pedal. To add a little more analysis to that, bII contains three tensions. But honestly, that's about all you can say.

As for Hand Over Heart, you said Fmaj instead of F#maj (presumably by mistake), and your analysis is all off. It's actually mostly in F#, not B. B does sound like the tonic when it's played, but that's only temporary. Everything else suggests F#.

I would name it F# but I named it Gb because you resolve it downwards to F.
I don't know if you said bII either because we are in phrygian or that's a neapolitan chord but in E minor there are 4 sharps and the solo he plays over top of it contains no sharps or flats.
As for hand of heart that was a mistake.
Do you say this chord progression is mixolydian?
Because I don't get wether your saying ''It's actually mostly in F#major'' or something like that or ''It's actually mostly in F#Mixolydian.
#11
Quote by liampje
I would name it F# but I named it Gb because you resolve it downwards to F.
I don't know if you said bII either because we are in phrygian or that's a neapolitan chord but in E minor there are 4 sharps and the solo he plays over top of it contains no sharps or flats.
As for hand of heart that was a mistake.
Do you say this chord progression is mixolydian?
Because I don't get wether your saying ''It's actually mostly in F#major'' or something like that or ''It's actually mostly in F#Mixolydian.


E minor contains only 1 sharp.
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#12
Quote by TDKshorty
E minor contains only 1 sharp.

Ow oops I named E major I'm just awake.
ow I did notice one sharp that's the part where he moves to the main theme again.
#13
Quote by liampje
Ow oops I named E major I'm just awake.
ow I did notice one sharp that's the part where he moves to the main theme again.



Yeah, but For The Love of God isn't in E major, maybe I'm confused?

I read your post and I don't think you know exactly how modes work, from what I recall I don't think song is in Phrygian at all, at least not over the the intro i-bII part.

Would you mind telling me where you got Phrygian from?
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#14
Quote by TDKshorty
Yeah, but For The Love of God isn't in E major, maybe I'm confused?

I read your post and I don't think you know exactly how modes work, from what I recall I don't think song is in Phrygian at all, at least not over the the intro i-bII part.

Would you mind telling me where you got Phrygian from?

I got Phrygian from Eminadd9 to Fmaj/E.
I thought Steve threw in the add9 with the F# to resolve it to the Fmaj/E.
But now I noticed I did see one F# when he goes back to the main theme.
But would that Eminadd9 work in C major to resolve to Fmaj?
Edit:E phrygian has also got Emin and Fmajor.
Last edited by liampje at Apr 30, 2011,
#15
Quote by liampje
I got Phrygian from Eminadd9 to Fmaj/E.
I thought Steve threw in the add9 with the F# to resolve it to the Fmaj/E.
But now I noticed I did see one F# when he goes back to the main theme.
But would that Eminadd9 work in C major to resolve to Fmaj?
Edit:E phrygian has also got Emin and Fmajor.


I mean I guess you could play phrygian over the bII chord but the Eminadd9 wouldn't work because of the F#
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#16
Quote by TDKshorty
I mean I guess you could play phrygian over the bII chord but the Eminadd9 wouldn't work because of the F#

So actually chord progressions from Steve Vai actually never use any wrong notes?
Are there any instrumental rock artist who might make chord progressions with ''wrong notes''?
#17
Quote by liampje
I got Phrygian from Eminadd9 to Fmaj/E.
I thought Steve threw in the add9 with the F# to resolve it to the Fmaj/E.
But now I noticed I did see one F# when he goes back to the main theme.
But would that Eminadd9 work in C major to resolve to Fmaj?
Edit:E phrygian has also got Emin and Fmajor.
No to all of that. The F# isn't "resolving" to the F. It's not a Gb. If it were a Gb, then it would be an Emadd(bb3). That's not what it is.

It's also not in C major. It's E minor, end of story. E phrygian also doesn't have an F# (or a Gb for that matter). Stop being stubborn.

Quote by liampje
So actually chord progressions from Steve Vai actually never use any wrong notes?
Are there any instrumental rock artist who might make chord progressions with ''wrong notes''?
There's no such thing as a "wrong note." I'm actually not quite sure what you're getting at.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#18
Quote by liampje
So actually chord progressions from Steve Vai actually never use any wrong notes?
Are there any instrumental rock artist who might make chord progressions with ''wrong notes''?


I wouldn't say never and I wouldn't say "wrong notes" either. This song doesn't have a wrong note really, it's just a flatted one, and I guess would be b

Steve's playing in E minor over every chord except the F, in this case he's playing in E phrygian, so I guess you would be right.

I just looked over the song and I hadn't really looked over it before lol, but I believe in most parts he's playing in E minor
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness