#1
Thought I'd share them with you guys;
I got a little bored one day.
Got out of lacrosse practice early, had no homework, but I had these lights laying around as well as the tools, so I put them together!
Yes, the string broke as I was playing it after I put it in


Edit: Also, first post here! Hey guys
Quote by leeb rocks
SO I'VE BEEN BALLS DEEP IN MYSELF THIS WHOLE TlME?!?!
Last edited by Konkordmusk at Apr 29, 2011,
#3
It's wired into the amp's circuity, connected at a 4.7k resistor
Quote by leeb rocks
SO I'VE BEEN BALLS DEEP IN MYSELF THIS WHOLE TlME?!?!
#5
Yep. 9v. They're on a tactile switch, so battery drain is minimal
Quote by leeb rocks
SO I'VE BEEN BALLS DEEP IN MYSELF THIS WHOLE TlME?!?!
#6
that's cool, I was thinking about mounting some myself, but using a watch battery to conserve space. But if you can fit the 9v in the control cavity, that's awesome! You shouldn't have to change the battery in about a decade or so I imagine?
#7
I wouldn't know how long the battery lasts. I would assume a year at most, but mostly because these are high intensity LED's. But a quick trip to the dollar store solves that.
Next up, I'm gonna make the LED's flash, with a trimmer/potentiometer to match the bpm of the music i'm playing.
Quote by leeb rocks
SO I'VE BEEN BALLS DEEP IN MYSELF THIS WHOLE TlME?!?!
#8
How many LEDs are on the guitar?

Just assume you have a 9V 600 mAh battery and those white LEDs have a forward voltage drop of 3V. If you're using a 4.7k ohm resistor, that's 6V / 4.7e3 = 1.3 mA current through each LED.

So if you have 4 LEDs, 4*1.3mA = 5.2 mA.

600 mAh / 5.2 mA = 115 hours of run time.

Next up, I'm gonna make the LED's flash, with a trimmer/potentiometer to match the bpm of the music i'm playing.


How is that going to make them flash? You should use a NFET or a BJT switch to do the flashing.
Last edited by farmosh203 at Apr 29, 2011,
#9
Quote by farmosh203
How many LEDs are on the guitar?

Just assume you have a 9V 600 mAh battery and those white LEDs have a forward voltage drop of 3V. If you're using a 4.7k ohm resistor, that's 6V / 4.7e3 = 1.3 mA current through each LED.

So if you have 4 LEDs, 4*1.3mA = 5.2 mA.

600 mAh / 5.2 mA = 115 hours of run time.


How is that going to make them flash? You should use a NFET or a BJT switch to do the flashing.

It's a strip, with 6 LEDs in it. It's a nifty little piece I picked up at a car parts store when I was installing lights under my grandmothers car running boards to help see at night, and these were the leftover.

Also, I didn't mean that I was gonna use a pot or trimmer to flash the lights, but merely to control the rate of flash. I like to work off of what I have available, rather than having to buy stuff. I was planning on using a super basic 555ic timer circuit
Quote by leeb rocks
SO I'VE BEEN BALLS DEEP IN MYSELF THIS WHOLE TlME?!?!
#10
Ah I was thinking you were going to do something like analyze the frequency of the notes being played and blink the leds accordingly. I guess that wouldn't be hard to do with something like an Atmel ATmega48 microcontroller.
#12
Quote by farmosh203
Ah I was thinking you were going to do something like analyze the frequency of the notes being played and blink the leds accordingly. I guess that wouldn't be hard to do with something like an Atmel ATmega48 microcontroller.

Naw, I think there's a line somewhere in there, for complexity, and a microcontroller would be crossing it haha.
I'll keep it simple, for now!
Quote by leeb rocks
SO I'VE BEEN BALLS DEEP IN MYSELF THIS WHOLE TlME?!?!