#1
I'm doing a certificate in music, and I think i'm doing OK so far, it's a big stretch from doing everything by ear to actually having to learn every little detail. But something has been doing my head in trying to figure it out.

One small part of the homework is to work out scale degrees to a song. The song is in E, and it says to write the scale degree numbers above the first 12 notes of the melody (lyrics)

I'm just not sure if I am doing it right or not?

Taking that the E major scale is, E, F, G, A, B, C, D, E
then E=1, F=2 etc...

But it asks us to write the scale degree number above each note of the song.

The melody actually starts on a B, lower then whats in the scale... so does that mean that anything matching the position of the corresponding note is between 1 to 8, and the lower B = 5 because the B in the scale is the 5th note of the E scale, or is something different all together?
It also asks if there are any "accidentals" in the piece, but to my knowledge an accidental is always written with a #(sharp) or b(flat), but now it's making me wonder if this lower B note might actually be an accidental?

I hope this makes sense and I haven't confused you either.
Last edited by Maniac1075 at Apr 30, 2011,
#3
Quote by Maniac1075
I'm doing a certificate in music, and I think i'm doing OK so far, it's a big stretch from doing everything by ear to actually having to learn every little detail. But something has been doing my head in trying to figure it out.

One small part of the homework is to work out scale degrees to a song. The song is in E, and it says to write the scale degree numbers above the first 12 notes of the melody (lyrics)

I'm just not sure if I am doing it right or not?

Taking that the E major scale is, E, F, G, A, B, C, D, E
then E=1, F=2 etc...

But it asks us to write the scale degree above each note of the song.

The melody actually starts on a B, lower then whats in the scale... so does that mean that anything matching the position of the corresponding note is between 1 to 8, and the lower B = 5 because the B in the scale is the 5th note of the E scale, or is something different all together?
It also asks if there are any "accidentals" in the piece, but to my knowledge an accidental is always written with a #(sharp) or b(flat), but now it's making me wonder if this lower B note might actually be an accidental?

I hope this makes sense and I haven't confused you either.


yup that first bit is right, the first scale degree will always be the key, not the first note, in the case you mentioned it's starting on the dominant, this is quite usual and chances are it went to the tonic note fairly quick.

yeah any accidental is marked with a sharp, a flat or a natural, the first note there (B) isn't an accidental cos it doesn't have one of these, it's just starting on the dominant.

also, watch out that when numbering 1-8, 8 can sometimes also be written as 1, as it's the same note, some places do it differently, for instance, here we would never mark anything as 8, we'd just go 1-7 then back to 1, handy to keep in mind if your looking at other stuff just so you know it isn't some weird new thing

what piece is it out of interest?

edit: oh yeah forgot to say about the four sharps! although it's easier once your using stave to not think of them nearly, think inside the octave (1-8) regardless of what key your in, this'll help you really understand the workings of tonal harmony in any key, but maybe that's just me
Last edited by gavk at Apr 30, 2011,
#4
Quote by gavk
yup that first bit is right, the first scale degree will always be the key, not the first note, in the case you mentioned it's starting on the dominant, this is quite usual and chances are it went to the tonic note fairly quick.

yeah any accidental is marked with a sharp, a flat or a natural, the first note there (B) isn't an accidental cos it doesn't have one of these, it's just starting on the dominant.

also, watch out that when numbering 1-8, 8 can sometimes also be written as 1, as it's the same note, some places do it differently, for instance, here we would never mark anything as 8, we'd just go 1-7 then back to 1, handy to keep in mind if your looking at other stuff just so you know it isn't some weird new thing

what piece is it out of interest?

edit: oh yeah forgot to say about the four sharps! although it's easier once your using stave to not think of them nearly, think inside the octave (1-8) regardless of what key your in, this'll help you really understand the workings of tonal harmony in any key, but maybe that's just me


Thanks Gavk,

It's Robbie Williams "Angels".
#5
Quote by Etidlover
Emajor scale is E F# G# A B C# D# E.

Oh yeah, I forgot to write that, but that wasnt what I needed help with, but thanks
#6
Are you confused that because it doesn't start on E that it can't be in E major ? I don't entirely understand your question. The piece can be in E and start on any of the notes in the scale, not necessarily the root!

Also it's important to be clear about your scale next time :P

The piece could be starting on a B because the first chord could be B dominant 7 which pulls strongly back to E major.

What are the chords for the piece ?
I think your homework is asking you to label the progression using roman numerals. That makes sense to me anyway, I don't see any benefit from labeling scale degrees on a song unless it's a really in depth analysis of how certain degrees resolve to the tonic etc (Not relevant here)
Last edited by Zanon at Apr 30, 2011,
#7
If you mean by degree the notes they are.
E F# G# A B C# D# E.
If you mean by their names.
E=Tonic
F#=Supertonic
G#=Mediant
A=Subdominant
B=Dominant
C#=Submediant
D#=Leading tone.
#8
Quote by Maniac1075
Oh yeah, I forgot to write that, but that wasnt what I needed help with, but thanks


Hehe I didn't reply your question because I didn't understand it to be honest... At first I thought you were asking for the progression but then the "The melody actually starts on a B, lower then whats in the scale" confused me...
#9
Quote by Etidlover
"The melody actually starts on a B, lower then whats in the scale" confused me...


I think he is saying that the B note on the E major scale is lower than the B note on the E major scale that he is playing.... Comparing a low B to a high B....

I dont know.... I dont think I can explain what someone else said, especially since Im not them...

Anyways, If we count 1-7, then start over on the 8, then it is my belief that the low B is the same scale degree as the B in the scale.
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#10
Any B note anywhere is going to be a 5.

An accidental is any note that's NOT E F# G# A B C# or D#.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#11
Quote by food1010
Any B note anywhere is going to be a 5.

An accidental is any note that's NOT E F# G# A B C# or D#.


thanks everyone for the help. I already submitted my work and got 100%.

Yes, the B note i referred to was outside of the E major scale, but in the end, it was still a 5...

thank everyone