#1
My epiphone les paul studio(honestly a pretty good guitar) has some trouble staying in tune, mainly the g string. i was just wondering if these would help keep it in tune better. im going on tour this summer and i plan on using this as one of my main guitars and a back up.(i was going to but a 1989 gibson les paul standard or 1974 gibson les paul custom, but its safer to wait till after the tour so i have money for the tour haha)

http://www.guitarcenter.com/Hipshot-6GLO-Grip-Lock-Locking-Guitar-Tuning-Machines-3-3-424086-i1527280.gc

any opinions would be awesome
I also do plan on upgading the pickups in this one, because the toggle switch is broken(the part that you flick) and a pick up isnt responding. (instead of fixing it im using it as an excuse to upgrade =])
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#2
Locking tuners are a nice thing to have, but I find that guitars that don't have tremolos won't get all that much from them, tuning stability-wise. 90% of the time when a guitar doesn't stay in tune, the nut is to blame. It's important that the grooves are correctly cut for whatever gauge of strings you use with the guitar, and also that the nut is the right heigth (will help with intonation, especially on the first fret). The nut material is also a big thing - I suggest graphtec, as it's pretty much the most slippery nut material out there and will keep re-lubricating itself, thus preventing the strings from binding.

Generally speaking, a good set-up overall will further help with many things, including tuning stability. Correct string gauge for your tuning should be a given, but yeah, I'd start with the nut.
Gear:

Guitars: Ibanez SV5470F, Ibanez Xpt700, Fender MIM Standard Stratocaster ('04-'05), Jackson Ps-2
Ashton AG200,
Amps: ENGL E530, Bugera 6262-212,
FX: TC Electronics G-major 2, Behringer EQ700, Morley Volume / Wah
#3
Quote by The^Unforgiven
Locking tuners are a nice thing to have, but I find that guitars that don't have tremolos won't get all that much from them, tuning stability-wise. 90% of the time when a guitar doesn't stay in tune, the nut is to blame. It's important that the grooves are correctly cut for whatever gauge of strings you use with the guitar, and also that the nut is the right heigth (will help with intonation, especially on the first fret). The nut material is also a big thing - I suggest graphtec, as it's pretty much the most slippery nut material out there and will keep re-lubricating itself, thus preventing the strings from binding.

Generally speaking, a good set-up overall will further help with many things, including tuning stability. Correct string gauge for your tuning should be a given, but yeah, I'd start with the nut.

+1
The nut seems to be the main culprit if tuning instubility in the lower Epi line
#4
Another +1 for the nut, also the G string always tends to a be a touch funny tuning wise on most guitars i've played, not sure why
Quote by TheQuailman
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#5
I had a problem with my G string binding in the nut. I loosened up the string, lifted it out, and put a small amount of graphite in there and reseated it. It eliminated the binding and the string is always in tune now.