#1
I'm starting a folk band with this girl singing(hot), me on guitar.
What all do I need to know? I've been in rock bands before. Will someone recommend me some folk bands? Where we can gig at? What all we will need? And anything else you think I'll need/need to know.

Thanks!
#2
Quote by hahaha15
I'm starting a folk band with this girl singing(hot), me on guitar.
What all do I need to know? I've been in rock bands before. Will someone recommend me some folk bands? Where we can gig at? What all we will need? And anything else you think I'll need/need to know.

Thanks!

haha r u only in it cuz she's hot?

try out good old war, nick drake, and anthony green's solo stuff.

folk guitar technique is almost the exact same as country technique, the difference is more in the mood and the note choice than how you're playing. learn the right-hand techniques used in country, get "at a glance: country guitar" it should help. then u just have to be creative, certain chord progressions sound more country than folk, so figure them out and avoid them. also folk more often uses capoes, its simply more high-pitch sounding than country. try to come up with some interesting chord voicings and apply you're new right-hand techniques to tha lotta folk people use finger style and play embelleshed bar-chords, almost playing a melody and chord progression at the same time.

u should be able to gig at al the same places you used to. try coffee places too. and open mic things often have a lotta folk.

hope this helped
#4
Quote by hahaha15
I'm starting a folk band with this girl singing(hot), me on guitar.
What all do I need to know? I've been in rock bands before. Will someone recommend me some folk bands? Where we can gig at? What all we will need? And anything else you think I'll need/need to know.

Thanks!


Well usually the guitarist in folk plays acoustic, so if you're not used to playing acoustic guitar I'd get on that. Learn to use a capo too so that you can adjust songs to the singer's key. A pickup for that acoustic guitar is almost mandatory, whether it be built in or a sound-hole pickup. Fingerpicking can occur more than usual than rock bands.

Otherwise it's the same as every other band. Decide whether you're an originals or cover band. Learn songs. Play gigs etc.

An advantage of being in a folk-ish (acoustic) band is that it's highly portable. You don't need to bring along your massive amp or spend too much time setting up. You can play unplugged in some circumstances and play venues like cafes or happy hour at bars which can pay well.

In terms of folky bands or guitarists, it's well worth paying attention to how Paul Simon http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dau2_Lt8pbM plays the guitar, he's an awesome rhythm guitarist.

But the term "folk" is so wide that it's simply used to describe "acoustic guitar music" now. When I was growing up "folk" music was something I connected to old songs like Tom Dooley, or the Kingston Trio http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gzn9uqEktv8&feature=fvwrel , but now it also includes Jack Johnson http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPqVP3VAO08 and Mumford and Sons http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLJf9qJHR3E.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#5
to buil don what alan said. woodie guthrie and bob dylan are folk. andrew jackson jihad and wingnut dishwashers union also folk. its a very broad genre so you may need to look into the sound you guys are going for.
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#6
Fiction Family and Fleet Foxes are a couple of fantastic "folk" groups. What they really are is up for debate, but I consider it folk.

I think the kind of folk most are familiar with is folk-pop or singer-songwriter folk. This includes things like Jack Johnson, Jason Mraz, and Colbie Callait to throw out some of the bigger names in the genre. I also think these are the artists you would want to look more at if you're looking at doing a 2 person with just guitar and vocals. All three of them, Jack Johnson especially, have a ton of songs that are nothing more than an acoustic guitar and a voice.
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#8
Oh, and look up Iron & Wine. They're a good example.
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#9
It really helps if we know where you come from. In the UK there are a few folk venues but the real distinction is between acoustic venues and band venues. Although the name 'folk' is used interchangeably with acoustic most of the music is actually the sort of singer songwriter stuff. In the UK there aren't usually many hang-ups about genre at these venues so you can play what you want. We do an acoustic version of Robbie Williams 'Let me entertain you' and stuff by the Killers and Stereophonics mixed in with true acoustic songs and they go down OK.

A lot of venues only do acoustic sets, it doesn't drive their regulars away and it doesn't take over half the venue. Its also cheaper to pay two people rather than a band. Although acts are described as acoustic they often/usually have small PA's nowadays. Look at something like the Yamaha Stagepas 300. You don't need or want a band PA as you need something smaller and with a lot more clarity.

Check out YouTube and try Lemonrock.com to see what sort of things people are doing and start going to acoutic venues to get a feel for the audiences. Do some open mics and if you are any good you'll soon pick up bookings. If anything it is an easier market than for bands.

With a female singer we cover a lot of Amy Macdonald, KT Tunstall, Amy Winehouse but there is a huge back catalogue of female folk and songwriters