#1
Sup guys

I play a lot of progressive music, its also very ambient but i like the feel of playing in odd time sigs.

A few of my non metal loving friends listen to it and apparently they quite like it but for some reason they always ask me if im good at math?

I dont know if its because of the time sigs or just the fact that (because i write with layers) my songs are quite complex. its the same if i show them videos of people like tomas haake or tosin abasi . . . . .

personally i have never linked my ability to count 7/4 to my ability to do long division haha

anyone else have this from anyone?
im really interested to know if its not just me haha

cheers!
#2
alot of people actually do link math to music but im not that way. I also like top play with alot of odd times and write some my own stuff with it as well, especially lately for some reason. but anyways maybe they do not understand what time signatures really mean cuz for along time i didnt and i thought it was all about math too! then i learned and realized that though there is some math involved its really not very complex lol
#3
I heard about something like this from an old teacher of mine. apparently "scientists" have made some connection between musical and mathematical ability. I don't buy it, cuz I'm decent on guitar but crap with numbers, but it is "science"
#4
Quote by EFGuitar
I heard about something like this from an old teacher of mine. apparently "scientists" have made some connection between musical and mathematical ability. I don't buy it, cuz I'm decent on guitar but crap with numbers, but it is "science"


im the same, dont get me wrong im not the master of timing but i do a far better job of it than any maths problem haha!
#6
im not very knowledgeable about time signatures, but i think this is correct: if you have a 3/4 and 4/4 polyrhythm, then they will meet every 3*4 = 12th quarter note. its not very complex, but its still mathematical
In the works.
#7
Maths isn't really about long division or trigonometry - it's about spotting patterns and making deductions. The pattern spotting part is also crucial in music - a scale is a pattern of notes in the same way working out differential calculus is a pattern of methods.

When you write some music in 7/4 you're not thinking about how you need the beat to fall on 1-3-5-- 1-3-5-- in the same was as when I tell you to multiply 5x6 you don't have to count 5 lots of 6 (5+5+5+5+5+5) you just know it. The memory you build up of small building blocks like chords and rhythms is equally applicable in science/maths as it is to music.

EDIT: that is not to say you need to be good at maths to be good at music or vica=versa. You just use the same type of memory so they're mutually beneficial. In a similar way to how going running could improve your fitness for swimming.

EDIT2: "promote your band...?"
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
Last edited by doive at Apr 30, 2011,
#8
I think there may be some correlation. Not necessarily between your mathematical ability and musical ability, but certainly between mathematical mindedness and technical musical understanding. Obviously, if you don't think at a high level, you won't be very good at writing complex music.

I'm no speed demon on guitar, but I like to think of myself as an intellectual person. I also enjoy listening and writing complex pieces of music. However, as far as the music I perform, I like to keep it fairly simple and catchy.

That is all.
#9
Quote by darkwolf291
Don't forget to divide the Guitar by the bass and carry the hi-hat too keep the sonic equation equal.


((8 strings)2 * 6 string bass / (kick)2 - ((china stacks)2)2) in 7/4?
#12
Fridjent...!! hahaha love it, I'm really on a djent kick right now.

Feelin RAC btw.
Last edited by TGreg at May 2, 2011,
#13
music is kind of complex and mathematical stuff ... but if you want to look at it that way.

when it's to complex and symmetrical for me it sounds like a perfect plastic barbie is drumming with ken on the friggin plastic pefrect played guitar.