#1
I wrote a chord progression in D today and I played a little movment that I really like

It's a F#7(#5) (F# a# e d#) chord that resolves to a B minor (B F# D)

I guess the A# resolves up and the D# resolves down and the F# stays the same

it sounds pretty great

Anyone care to elaborate or did I just explain it all, ha
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#2
Sounds like the progression is actually in B minor if it resolves there.

Otherwise all notes used are all in the scale of B minor, no accidentals employed, there's no reason why it wouldn't work.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
Quote by AlanHB
Sounds like the progression is actually in B minor if it resolves there.

Otherwise all notes used are all in the scale of B minor, no accidentals employed, there's no reason why it wouldn't work.



Well I play a G in the song too ha, so unless I was using B minor as something modal other than natural minor it'd still be in G, but I'm trying to get down all the chords because I'm using some oddly voiced chords, so that I can tell, but I do start on D and I have a progression, the songs ends G-A-D, so it's a IV-V-I progression
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#4
Quote by TDKshorty
Well I play a G in the song too ha, so unless I was using B minor as something modal other than natural minor it'd still be in G, but I'm trying to get down all the chords because I'm using some oddly voiced chords, so that I can tell, but I do start on D and I have a progression, the songs ends G-A-D, so it's a IV-V-I progression


Well with the combination of those chords there's no way thst it's modal.

What's the actual chord progression?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#5
It's a V i, only the strongest relationship between two chords in music.

To be a bit more specific, F#7#5 is just an altered dominant to the B minor chord. The most important part of the dominant-tonic relationship is the third of the dominant chord resolving to the root of the tonic. Play a B harmonic minor scale (B C# D E F# G A#). Try ending on that A#. Notice how hard that wants to resolve a half-step up. Now play the B to complete the cycle. Notice how much tension is released when you resolve back to the tonic (B) after that leading tone (A#). Dominant chords (V, if you're using roman numeral chord notation) are just a nice way to harmonize that leading tone. You can use just a nice major chord which gives you a pretty strong, yet stable/direct resolution. However, you can make it a 7th chord by adding that b7 on top. The b7 is a tritone away from the 3 (which is the leading tone, or 7, to the tonic), which creates some nice tension which wants to resolve. The b7 also wants to resolve down to the 3 of the tonic chord (it is the 4 in relation to the tonic. If the tonic is major, this is a nice half-step resolution). When you augment the fifth in the dominant chord, this creates even more tension, because it gives you an augmented triad on bottom, which is a pretty unstable chord. It really wants to resolve to that tonic chord.

Let's use some letters to make this more clear. We'll do this in C major to make it easy.

So the dominant in C is G. So we have a G major (G B D) to a C major (C E G). That leading tone I was talking about is the B. If you play the C major scale, the B wants to resolve up to the C. Now let's add the b7 (F) on top of the G major chord, giving us G7. Play B and F together. Hear how dissonant this is, because it's a tritone. Now try playing just the B and F, and resolving the B up to C and the F down to E. Make sure you play the B and C on the bottom and the F and E on top. Hear how there's that nice contrary motion, and both of them resolve nicely from that unstable tritone to that nice major third.

Ok, so your song is in the key of D, not B minor. This is cool, because they are relative keys, so they're easy to modulate between pretty smoothly. Technically F#7#5 is a secondary dominant since Bm isn't the tonic. Secondary dominants are nice though because they temporarily tonicize a chord other than the actual tonic. And since Bm is the tonic of the relative minor key, this isn't a very abrupt tonicization, it flows very nicely.

Try this progression: G A D - Em F#7#5 Bm - Em7 A7#5 D. Notice how we use the same type of chord to resolve to the relative minor as we do to resolve back to the original relative major tonic.

I hope that helps. 7#5 chords are a personal favorite of mine, they sound very nice for jazz. They are especially tasty as a tritone sub (dominant chord built on the b2 instead of the 5). Try an Ab7#5 to a G.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#6
I'm gonna hit the hay I'm wiped lol! But I'll post the progression and then read over everyones posts in the morning


It's a Dmaj9, Gmaj7 (no 5th), F#7#5, Bm, G, A, D

something like that but I'll show you chord diagrams of how I play the first three chords

e-0
b-10
g-11
d-0
a-12
e

e
b--7
g--0
d--9
a-10
e

e
b-5
d-7
g-8
a-9
e

I hope I labeled them right
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#7
Chords like to move up by fourth (or down by fifth). Dominant chords do this more strongly than any other chord. Consider Dmaj7 Gmaj7 F#m7 Bm7. It still sounds good and fits the key of D major more precisely. By raising the third of the the F#m7 and making it an F#7 you change the motion from the A to the B into A# to B, which is a bit stronger. The #5 is just a nice color tone.

Alternatively, if you're in D major, just consider an F#7 chord being borrowed from its relative minor (B minor).
#8
Quote by TDKshorty
It's a Dmaj9, Gmaj7 (no 5th), F#7#5, Bm, G, A, D


Ahh I see, well that progression resolves strongly to D major then.

The F#7#5 as mentioned above is borrowed from the relative melodic minor.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#9
That's a Dadd9, not Dmaj9. But yeah, everything has been said already.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#10
Quote by food1010
It's a V i, only the strongest relationship between two chords in music.

To be a bit more specific, F#7#5 is just an altered dominant to the B minor chord.



^ this

they call that a [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secondary_dominant]secondary dominant

V/vi in this case. (though the V is altered)
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at May 1, 2011,
#11
Thanks for all your help guys!
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness