#1
What are the differences?
Is it like a Squier strat to a MIA strat?
or more like MIM to MIA?
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#2
Studio's tend to go either way, they can be very good or awful so shop around.

The build quality of the studio is gunna be a fair bit better than the epi. It will have Gibson pickups in it, instead of Epi's own brand stuff. The wood should be of a better quality too. You can get some really well made epi's that can be on par with studio's but there are some pretty bad studio's out there though. There is (in my opinion) a fair bit of difference between the two, (assuming you get a good example of each). Playability, sound, build quality etc.
#3
Quote by SKArface McDank
What are the differences?
Is it like a Squier strat to a MIA strat?
or more like MIM to MIA?


Closer to MIM/MIA in my opinion.

You're pretty much going to get better quality everything on the Gibson. But from my experiences, Studios from either are very inconsistent. Definitely a try before you buy situation.
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#4
This is an outdated link that describes the differences between various Les Pauls: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/lespaulguide

But the truth is if you have to ask, then the differences probably won't matter to you. Both guitars are excellent. If you change pick-ups on the Epi, then the difference in sound through a practice amp won't be very significant.

If you were gigging frequently and were trying to achieve "YOUR" sound, then you wouldn't even bother asking this question here.
#5
thanks for the link,
Ill have you know, Im a tone freak, im trying to find my sound, I got my blues sound, but now I need my lead ska sound. not that im gigging or anything, I just like having the tone I want when I come up with small riffs
I have a tweaker head btw
The illegality of cannabis is outrageous, an impediment to full utilization of a drug which helps produce the serenity and insight, sensitivity and fellowship so desperately needed in this increasingly mad and dangerous world.
- Carl Sagan
#6
I have a Gibson LP Studio and love it. Well worth the $$ IMHO. Never tried a Epi studio but am about to buy another guitar for practicing alone at home and am considering one.
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#7
it can range from good MIM/ bad MIA all the way to bad squire/ good MIA. the reality is that both gibsons and epi's are fairly inconsistent in terms of quality.

that being said, gibsons are generally quite a bit better, certainly worth the extra money. they are made from better bits of wood, they have better hardware and they have significantly better pickups. if you can put together the cash to get a gibson, go for it
#8
I was going to buy a les paul studio for my first guitar, but i was curious like you so i went to the guitar store and tried out an epi. I brought my friend who is a very very good guitarist with me to play some. We played through a vox VT, which is the amp im going to get with the guitar.

Dude the epi les pauls are really good guitars. We played the epi les paul standard plus top. Which is the model i want to get and the one i'd recommend.

You know how you read online that they cant stay in tune. Well, we didnt notice that with this paul. The store we went to sets up all guitars before selling them, This paul would do bends and stay in tune, It did everything very well.

The pickups sounded a bit muddy. But pickups are an easy upgrade to do later.

Finish wise the epi is a beautiful guitar. I couldn't find any flaws with it just from looking at it. As a first guitar I think the epi's are a great choice.

Check it, you can spend 800-900 on a guitar with less cosmetic features, or you can spend about 500 on a guitar that looks damn good, and is easily upgradeable.

If you got a new epi standard plus top, even if you put in new pickups, changed to locking tuners, dropped in a graphite nut, and changed the pots. You'ld still be paying less in total than a new les paul studio. And you'ld be getting a great looking guitar which would sound a whole lot better.

epi les paul standard plus top 500
2 - Seymour Duncan pickups 190
locking tuners 35
Graphite nut 14
2 push pull pots 22

Total 760


If you dont want to change anything and the looks arent a big deal for you then the studio is a solid choice.

You should also check out the PRS SE's those are awesome guitars, and at a great price.

Bottomline is buy a guitar in person and try it out DONT buy one online
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Last edited by reggaebassman at May 5, 2011,
#10
you can get a gibson studio used for less than a new epi.

as usual some rock, some kinda suck.


the same goes for the gibsons.

try before you buy etc...
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#11
Manufacturer location, wood choice, build quality, finish. Take the Gibson every time.
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#12
Quote by gregs1020
you can get a gibson studio used for less than a new epi.

as usual some rock, some kinda suck.


the same goes for the gibsons.

try before you buy etc...

this.

there's the fact that they are all completely different to one another to take into consideration, and then there's personal preference.

you should try both. you're likely to find the gibson studio is just an all-round better guitar to the epi. but you might like the epis better, and you might find yourself thinking the gibsons are junk that you wouldn't want to pay even half the price-tag for.

its your money, your opinion, your choice
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#13
i know we are talking about studios, however....

i bought a Epi LP Custom a few years ago for $600. It is, to this day, one of the nicest guitars that i have laid my hands on. The main difference between Gibson and Epi is the wood quality and the pickups. Gibson tends to run hotter pickups. However, if youre running an Epi and are considering installing new pickups then what is the point?
#14
Quote by edubz09
i know we are talking about studios, however....

i bought a Epi LP Custom a few years ago for $600. It is, to this day, one of the nicest guitars that i have laid my hands on. The main difference between Gibson and Epi is the wood quality and the pickups. Gibson tends to run hotter pickups. However, if youre running an Epi and are considering installing new pickups then what is the point?

you sort of answered your own hypothetical question there

if the wood has 'better' acoustic properties then you'll just get a 'better' sound from the gibson anyway - i hate to use the word 'better' when talking about subjective things like this, because despite the difference in build quality, epis and gibsons also sound very different and not necessarily in a way that epiphones are a "crap version" of the same sound.

but if you were to put some seymour duncans (for example) in an epi and then put the same set in a gibson, which would give you a better quality tone? more often than not it'd be the gibson - but there will always be a few people who'd disagree with that and find they like the epi better.

it works like that with gibsons and higher end gibsons, too
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#15
Quote by Blompcube
you sort of answered your own hypothetical question there

if the wood has 'better' acoustic properties then you'll just get a 'better' sound from the gibson anyway - i hate to use the word 'better' when talking about subjective things like this, because despite the difference in build quality, epis and gibsons also sound very different and not necessarily in a way that epiphones are a "crap version" of the same sound.

but if you were to put some seymour duncans (for example) in an epi and then put the same set in a gibson, which would give you a better quality tone? more often than not it'd be the gibson - but there will always be a few people who'd disagree with that and find they like the epi better.

it works like that with gibsons and higher end gibsons, too


What people forget is that no two guitars are ever exactly the same tonally. It depends on the tree the wood was taken from. Different trees have different moisture contents and mineral contents which all affect the tone very slightly. The fact that Gibson use 'better' wood is completly arbitrary because no two wood pieces are exactly the same even if you compare identical models.

If you replace the electronics and hardware on an Epiphone with the stuff Gibson use, you will sound extremly similar, but not identical. You might even sound 'better' than the Gibson because the pickups and hardware just happen to work with the strengths the wood has tonally, just by chance.

Even you if you compare identical Gibson models, they will not sound alike, again for the same reason that no two wood pieces sound the same.
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#16
Aside from factors mentioned -- materials and craftsmanship -- Gibson has very good quality assurance. The instrument you get has been played and calibrated by a luthier and is guaranteed for life.

Epi's are often very good instruments -- especially for the price .. but there are duds that get to the store -- problems with cheap electronics, irregular frets, neck warp, bad intonation and so forth will show up at the retailer. You can get a nice Epiphone or a dud -- caveat emptor!!!

Also note -- Epiphones made in Indonesia and China tend to have more problems than those made in Korea or Japan ... less quality control.
#17
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
What people forget is that no two guitars are ever exactly the same tonally. It depends on the tree the wood was taken from. Different trees have different moisture contents and mineral contents which all affect the tone very slightly. The fact that Gibson use 'better' wood is completly arbitrary because no two wood pieces are exactly the same even if you compare identical models.

If you replace the electronics and hardware on an Epiphone with the stuff Gibson use, you will sound extremly similar, but not identical. You might even sound 'better' than the Gibson because the pickups and hardware just happen to work with the strengths the wood has tonally, just by chance.

Even you if you compare identical Gibson models, they will not sound alike, again for the same reason that no two wood pieces sound the same.

yep, that's kinda what i meant to imply, except i was responding to a generalisation in general terms

although there are different types of the same "species" of wood from different parts of the world - it would really be helpful if more companies would specify where they get it from, but having played and compared a lot of gibsons and epiphones i doubt the type of wood they use is actually the same 'breed' of mahogany, because even if you can get an epiphone sounding "as good" (subjective, of course) they never seem to sound, or rather respond similarly. acoustically, gibsons tend to naturally have a bit more "twang" in the attack, whereas the "equivalent" epis comparatively have less of a twang and a bit more of a "thud". if that makes sense...
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#18
Quote by Blompcube
yep, that's kinda what i meant to imply, except i was responding to a generalisation in general terms

although there are different types of the same "species" of wood from different parts of the world - it would really be helpful if more companies would specify where they get it from, but having played and compared a lot of gibsons and epiphones i doubt the type of wood they use is actually the same 'breed' of mahogany, because even if you can get an epiphone sounding "as good" (subjective, of course) they never seem to sound, or rather respond similarly. acoustically, gibsons tend to naturally have a bit more "twang" in the attack, whereas the "equivalent" epis comparatively have less of a twang and a bit more of a "thud". if that makes sense...


I totally agree. Manufacturers should say what speciies of wood is used. I find that Gibsons have less mids and aren't as dark sounding as Epiphone equivelents.
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#19
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
What people forget is that no two guitars are ever exactly the same tonally. It depends on the tree the wood was taken from. Different trees have different moisture contents and mineral contents which all affect the tone very slightly. The fact that Gibson use 'better' wood is completly arbitrary because no two wood pieces are exactly the same even if you compare identical models.

If you replace the electronics and hardware on an Epiphone with the stuff Gibson use, you will sound extremly similar, but not identical. You might even sound 'better' than the Gibson because the pickups and hardware just happen to work with the strengths the wood has tonally, just by chance.

Even you if you compare identical Gibson models, they will not sound alike, again for the same reason that no two wood pieces sound the same.


There's a big difference between 1-2 pieces of kiln dried Honduran Mahogany (Gibson) and mutilple pieces of no-name mahogany with a veneer over top to make them look like 1-piece bodies. One main thing is cost and helps explain why if someone prefers a nicer mahogany they pay more. The other is finish on the wood. Gibsons are hand sprayed Nitro which is obviously more costly to perfor, requires multiple coats with significant drying time in between, requiring hand buffing and also affects the sound. Epi uses robot applied Poly, damned near indestructible but cheaper to perform (dries fast, less work invloved)

Depending on what sound you're after you may very well be satisfied with an Epi (especially after upgrading certain tonal elements). But money spent on thise upgrades are lost as far as resale goes.

In the end, you're not paying for the name on the headstock, you're paying for all the handwork, the cost of the materials, the lifetime warranty etc. Those are the things the "name" represents.
Moving on.....
#20
Gibson havn't used Honduran mahogany for years mate. It's endangered and illegal to trade and harvest. Also, nitro finishes are terrible at protecting the guitar and Gibson is known for doing a sloppy job on finishes. Also, Epiphone doesn't use veneers (but if they did, it be the best veneers in the world ). They just make the bodies (normally 2 piece) and if a top is used, they use a maple cap.

And besides, a lot of these factors are covered up with distortion 80% of the time. Any usage of a nitro finish tonally, is going to be so minute in the context of a mix or playing live (since a vast majority of people who spend such money on a guitar are doing gigs and making mixes), it just becomes a waste of money in my opinion.

I think warrenty service is a load of Barbra Striesand. If the guitar is so flawless (because you spent so much money, you expect the guitar to be completly perfect) you would never need warranty service. Whenever you complain of a dead note or somthing, the company just says it is a setup issue. Companies will fight tooth and nail to not pay up. If you have spent so much money on a Gibson, it should be utterly dependable. It should last an absalute lifetime if taken care of, but no. There are many unnacceptable reports of bad Gibsons If you are spending so much money, it should be FLAWLESS!

I also don't care about the history of the brand. If the guitars are bogus it doesn't matter how long the company's been running. I'm not giving the company my hard-earned cash if there are better alternatives.



Just my two pennies. I just refuse to believe in brand names and i would rather have quality instruments that aren't stupidly expensive.

EDIT: I'm not a hater of Gibson either. What i have said are just the reports i have heard from many owners of different Gibson models.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at May 6, 2011,
#21
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Gibson havn't used Honduran mahogany for years mate. It's endangered and illegal to trade and harvest. Also, nitro finishes are terrible at protecting the guitar and Gibson is known for doing a sloppy job on finishes. Also, Epiphone doesn't use veneers (but if they did, it be the best veneers in the world ). They just make the bodies (normally 2 piece) and if a top is used, they use a maple cap.

And besides, a lot of these factors are covered up with distortion 80% of the time. Any usage of a nitro finish tonally, is going to be so minute in the context of a mix or playing live (since a vast majority of people who spend such money on a guitar are doing gigs and making mixes), it just becomes a waste of money in my opinion.

I think warrenty service is a load of Barbra Striesand. If the guitar is so flawless (because you spent so much money, you expect the guitar to be completly perfect) you would never need warranty service. Whenever you complain of a dead note or somthing, the company just says it is a setup issue. Companies will fight tooth and nail to not pay up. If you have spent so much money on a Gibson, it should be utterly dependable. It should last an absalute lifetime if taken care of, but no. There are many unnacceptable reports of bad Gibsons If you are spending so much money, it should be FLAWLESS!

I also don't care about the history of the brand. If the guitars are bogus it doesn't matter how long the company's been running. I'm not giving the company my hard-earned cash if there are better alternatives.



Just my two pennies. I just refuse to believe in brand names and i would rather have quality instruments that aren't stupidly expensive.

EDIT: I'm not a hater of Gibson either. What i have said are just the reports i have heard from many owners of different Gibson models.


I think you're misinformed. Honduran Mahogany is legal if purchased from certified sellers which Gibson does do ((Brazillian Rosewood is banned). The same goes for the Madagascar Rosewood they've been using since 2003 when the used up the last of the Brazilian Rosewood (which I think you're confusing with Mahogany here!). Gibson recently got raided when a question about the source of their woods came up, this would not happen unless they actually used woods that fell under the treaty.
Most foreign guitar companies use phillipine "mahogany" a related wood but not the same and has no such limitations on use.
As you can see I own several Gibsons, Two are custom shop models and from what I've seen most of the people bashing Gibson are teenagers who know next to nothing and are more upset with the fact they can't afford a Gibson, & are happy to pass along the "Gibson's quality control is crap these days" BS. If you actually visit a site with older players and people who own Gibsons you'll get a totally different story.

Moving on.....
Last edited by KenG at May 6, 2011,
#22
Quote by KenG
from what I've seen most of the people bashing Gibson are teenagers who know next to nothing and are more upset with the fact they can't afford a Gibson, & are happy to pass along the "Gibson's quality control is crap these days" BS.


It's nice to know you are more than happy to prejudge people's opinions.
I'm not one of those stupid teenagers. I don't want a Gibson LP. I never have wanted one. The only thing i'd want that had Gibson on it is an Explorer, but that isn't the point. For the kind of playing that i want and from my own personal experiences with playing A LP Custom, and 2 LP Standards, i have simply not liked them all that much for all the hype that they get from a lot of people. I have had better playing experiences with PRS SE's tbh

These vids show what kind of quality control issues some Gibsons have. This whole notion that "Gibson sucks these days" didn't appear out of nowhere.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BI3KAkO9d8g
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EgYLMJ1pMcU&feature=related
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