#1
When you were a younger player (Hell, even now), did you have something against boutique amps?


To be honest, I did. I always thought, "I can pull off the tone I want with a dual Rec and a 6505+ (I listened to a lot of metalcore back then, kinda sorta still do now)"

But then I started getting into Prog rock and such. I saw that some used commonplace amps, and others used amps like Bogner, Diezel, etc. Thought that they all were overpriced.

But then I heard of Jet City. They're based off of Soldano's amps, and the 100H sounds fantastic. Hell, I like it more than the SLO.

Then I saw James Hetfield's gear page, and saw that he used a Diezel VH4 (so does Adam Jones, one of my biggest influences for tone and style.)

So yeah. Better start savin up some moneys....
NT

BE QUICK OR BE DEAD SON
#3
Well, okay?

About the amps being overpriced: If it makes you feel any better, neither Reinhold Bogner nor Peter Diezel have a giant money bin like Scrooge McDuck.
#4
never had a problem with boutique amps, but I definitely wasn't going to lay down the money for one as a beginner.
#5
Higher quality components + completely hand built by a skilled profession = higher price tag. Like Quail said, a lot of those boutique producers aren't exactly rich.
WTLTL 2011
#6
nope, never had a problem with boutique amps other than the fact I can't afford a $2000+ amp as an (almost)18 year old student
[img]http://cdn.gs.uproxx.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/v.gif[/img]
#7
I only had one problem with boutique gear of any type. Strike that, I still have that problem: the price.

╠═══════╬═══════╣

VOLUME SWELLING OCTAVE MONGER σƒ τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ

╠═══════╬═══════╣
#8
obviously, a $3000 or whatever head is gonna sound better than a $1500 head, but you have to consider how much better. if an amp costs twice as much, but maybe sounds 20% better (that's not really something that can be measured though), then you have to decide if that extra 20% is worth it. and if you can easily afford it or are a professional musician and can justify spending the extra money, it's probably worth buying the boutique for that extra 20%, where if you were just starting with touring you probably could spend the money on something you need more, and settle for the tone of the cheaper amp. though keep in mind when i say "settling" it's like saying you can't afford a Ferrari so you'll "settle" for a Corvette.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#9
Never had a problem with 'em.

In fact, my first major amp (aside from a couple of solid state practice amps and my Laney LC15 (not exactly suited for gigging)) was/is a Cornford Roadhouse 30, not boutique, but not a million miles away!

I actually don't think I'll buy any new amps which aren't of such regard.

The most un-boutique I'd want to go is Carvin or if I could get a good deal on a vintage Fender.
#11
Quote by theogonia777
obviously, a $3000 or whatever head is gonna sound better than a $1500 head, but you have to consider how much better. if an amp costs twice as much, but maybe sounds 20% better (that's not really something that can be measured though), then you have to decide if that extra 20% is worth it. and if you can easily afford it or are a professional musician and can justify spending the extra money, it's probably worth buying the boutique for that extra 20%, where if you were just starting with touring you probably could spend the money on something you need more, and settle for the tone of the cheaper amp. though keep in mind when i say "settling" it's like saying you can't afford a Ferrari so you'll "settle" for a Corvette.


so we all have to use spiders!!
Quote by RetroGunslinger
using nines for drop C# is like stringing the guitar with spaghetti


My Colourful Rig:
ESP M-ii Deluxe
ENGL E570
Mesa/Boogie Simul 295 Stereo
Framus FR212 v30
#12
Quote by TheQuailman
Well, okay?

About the amps being overpriced: If it makes you feel any better, neither Reinhold Bogner nor Peter Diezel have a giant money bin like Scrooge McDuck.
Dude, it's amazing what comes up when one has close to infinite patience. I love Germanic amps (Reinhold still is sorta kinda, eh?) and they're definitely worth the scratch. Tons of tone and built like tanks!

#13
Quote by Ippon
Dude, it's amazing what comes up when one has close to infinite patience. I love Germanic amps (Reinhold still is sorta kinda, eh?) and they're definitely worth the scratch. Tons of tone and built like tanks!


Yeah, definitely. I can see the problem when you need an amp desperately right now, but I've got a rig that does what I want, so I'm in no hurry when amp hunting, even though there's still tons of stuff I want to get my hands on. And good deals come along, if you keep your eyes open and know the prices stuff usually goes for.
It's not even a hassle. I check three sites for used gear every other day, and sometimes something good will come along. This is like twenty minutes per day of work maximum. That's nothing. It's even fun for the most part.
#14
To me the minor difference in tone from a quality non-boutique amp to a boutique amp isn't worth the hugely inflated price tag. I had the opportunity to play a Diesel when my band recorded our first demo in a friends studio. To be honest it didn't sound too much better to me than the various Marshall/Peavey tube amps I had used/heard used by other local guitarists.
#15
Quote by Tyler.Allain
To me the minor difference in tone from a quality non-boutique amp to a boutique amp isn't worth the hugely inflated price tag. I had the opportunity to play a Diesel when my band recorded our first demo in a friends studio. To be honest it didn't sound too much better to me than the various Marshall/Peavey tube amps I had used/heard used by other local guitarists.
True. One can get pleasing tones from even the most inexpensive gear. How the whole band plays together is so important. Given the choice, I'd still go for the slightly more expensive gear for the proven or perceived reliability and the better components and build quality.

#16
Quote by Tyler.Allain
To me the minor difference in tone from a quality non-boutique amp to a boutique amp isn't worth the hugely inflated price tag. I had the opportunity to play a Diesel when my band recorded our first demo in a friends studio. To be honest it didn't sound too much better to me than the various Marshall/Peavey tube amps I had used/heard used by other local guitarists.


I agree that the price of boutique doesn't match the improvement in tone. Hell more often than not while boutique amps simply sound "different" instead of better.

That said, the price isn't what I'd call inflated. There is a very VERY small profit margin on boutique amps. The parts are generally more expensive, and the time to build one is longer since generally they're built by hand. I'm willing to bet that Marshall makes more profit per amp than a boutique company ever will. Still, do all these high grade hand assembled parts make a difference? Sure, but it's marginal. Especially when thrown into the mix.
#17
Quote by JAHellraiser
nope, never had a problem with boutique amps other than the fact I can't afford a $2000+ amp as an 18 year old student


this would be exactly the same comment as i'd post. no further addition needed.
#18
Quote by Ippon
True. One can get pleasing tones from even the most inexpensive gear. How the whole band plays together is so important. Given the choice, I'd still go for the slightly more expensive gear for the proven or perceived reliability and the better components and build quality.



Part one: True. As I said in the OP, I want a Jet City 100. I can find one for $500 easy.

Part Two: also true. If the SLO and the JC sounded the same, and money did not matter, I would go with the SLO

EDIT: for those who might say, "Jey, the JC sounds like the SLO!" No it doesn't. At least not the one I'm looking at. The original Jet City 100 Head sounds like an Avenger with a clean channel. The HDM is more of an SLO than any other.

Refer to here for more info.
NT

BE QUICK OR BE DEAD SON
Last edited by NosralTserrof at May 1, 2011,
#20
I play and buy what I like. I've always favored old Marshall and Fender styled amp because I like how they sound. They're not boutique but I don't have anything against boutique amps. To have something against an amp just because they are or are not boutique is pretty shallow and immature.

That being said, I have no idea what you are getting at in your first thread.
Last edited by al112987 at May 1, 2011,
#21
Quote by Tunder250
so we all have to use spiders!!


did you even read what i posted? i don't see how you could have possibly gotten that out of what i was saying.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#22
Quote by al112987
I play and buy what I like. I've always favored old Marshall and Fender styled amp because I like how they sound. They're not boutique but I don't have anything against boutique amps. To have something against an amp just because they are or are not boutique is pretty shallow and immature.

That being said, I have no idea what you are getting at in your first thread.

Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#23
Quote by icronic
I agree that the price of boutique doesn't match the improvement in tone. Hell more often than not while boutique amps simply sound "different" instead of better.

That said, the price isn't what I'd call inflated. There is a very VERY small profit margin on boutique amps. The parts are generally more expensive, and the time to build one is longer since generally they're built by hand. I'm willing to bet that Marshall makes more profit per amp than a boutique company ever will. Still, do all these high grade hand assembled parts make a difference? Sure, but it's marginal. Especially when thrown into the mix.


The profit margin really depends on the maker. Diezel's margins are pretty small since they've got a ton of high quality components, complex switching systems and are severely overbuilt by hand. Same with guys like Suhr/CAA, Bogner, Soldano, etc. Stuff like Bruno amps which use regular grade transformers, regular grade parts, etc. have a HUGE profit margin.
E-peen:
Rhodes Gemini
Fryette Ultra Lead
Peavey 6505
THD Flexi 50

Gibson R0 Prototype
EBMM JP13 Rosewood
Fender CS Mary Kaye

WTLT

(512) Audio Engineering - Custom Pedal Builds, Mods and Repairs
#24
I have to ask...how do you severely overbuild something?

╠═══════╬═══════╣

VOLUME SWELLING OCTAVE MONGER σƒ τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ

╠═══════╬═══════╣
#25
^ By making it far sturdier - both structurally and electrically - than is necessary.

It's like how many old cars from the 50s and 60s were so overengineered that lots of them have been parted out and are still running to this day.

We'll see how many post-2000 cars are still around in 50 years. My guess is zero, other than the odd collectible.

Edit: another good example is military grade components.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#26
Quote by bubb_tubbs


Edit: another good example is military grade components.



You can shoot (with) your amp and play it too!
NT

BE QUICK OR BE DEAD SON
#27
Ooooh, I see. I getcha now. I'm not sure I'd say that's overbuilding, but maybe in the context of how things are underbuilt in comparison.

╠═══════╬═══════╣

VOLUME SWELLING OCTAVE MONGER σƒ τλε τρπ βπστλεπλσσδ

╠═══════╬═══════╣
#28
Quote by NosralTserrof
You can shoot (with) your amp and play it too!


A bugera, if you turn it all the way up perhaps. Good luck with that blast radius though
WTLTL 2011
#29
Quote by BaffAttack
I have to ask...how do you severely overbuild something?


like this





Prs se Holcomb is the answer