#1
When I really break it down I see that the modes are different positions of the minor scale.Can someone tell me why I need both.
#2
Because that's not what they are.

Put simply, you get modes when you use the notes of a major scale over a different tonic.

There's a modes sticky in MT, but if you're not already very familiar with intervals, the major scale and the basics of diatonic harmony there's no point going anywhere near modes.
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#3
^ I agree with this

bud if your trying to screw with modes in a Jazz fashion, simply start off with the Melodic minor scale. this doesn't have anything to do with modes, but mixing the melodic minor scale with Chromatic movements (that make sense) you can get a great jazz improv until you can grip the ideal behind modes. Although your right about them being derivitives of the minor scale in a sense, it really comes down to centering/starting on different tonics blah blah blah, all that bullshit
#4
Quote by sar8777
^ I agree with this

bud if your trying to screw with modes in a Jazz fashion, simply start off with the Melodic minor scale. this doesn't have anything to do with modes, but mixing the melodic minor scale with Chromatic movements (that make sense) you can get a great jazz improv until you can grip the ideal behind modes. Although your right about them being derivitives of the minor scale in a sense, it really comes down to centering/starting on different tonics blah blah blah, all that bullshit


Actually I play a mix of rock,funk,reggae and afro.I'm basically a singer/songwriter wants to play cool solos over his songs.I started out with the pentatonic and was told I should move up to the natural minor scale and then to modes.For some reason playing the minor scale when I solo feels right to me.When a song is in C major I play the A minor scale over it and it works great.From what I can see I'm playing the modes but looking at it from a minor perspective.I kind of look at the 5 positions of the minor scale and let my fingers do the walking.Am I missing something?
#5
Quote by kimanistar
Actually I play a mix of rock,funk,reggae and afro.I'm basically a singer/songwriter wants to play cool solos over his songs.I started out with the pentatonic and was told I should move up to the natural minor scale and then to modes.For some reason playing the minor scale when I solo feels right to me.When a song is in C major I play the A minor scale over it and it works great.From what I can see I'm playing the modes but looking at it from a minor perspective.I kind of look at the 5 positions of the minor scale and let my fingers do the walking.Am I missing something?


Yes. When you think you're playing A minor over a C major... you're just playing C major. The shapes and positions you're using don't make any difference to the actual scale and key you're using, it's just how the guitar works.
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#6
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Yes. When you think you're playing A minor over a C major... you're just playing C major. The shapes and positions you're using don't make any difference to the actual scale and key you're using, it's just how the guitar works.


I know that A minor and C major scale is the same thing.I just prefer to approach things from a minor perspective when I solo and a major approach when I am writing.What I meant was if i just use the minor scale and skip over the modes am I missing anything?
#7
Quote by kimanistar
I know that A minor and C major scale is the same thing.I just prefer to approach things from a minor perspective when I solo and a major approach when I am writing.What I meant was if i just use the minor scale and skip over the modes am I missing anything?


No, you're not missing anything but then you're really not "skipping over " the modes at all. You're just taking the time to learn things in the order they probably should be learned, not the order everyone seems to want them to be learned.
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#8
I know that A minor and C major scale is the same thing.I just prefer to approach things from a minor perspective when I solo and a major approach when I am writing.What I meant was if i just use the minor scale and skip over the modes am I missing anything?


Well, you're missing... modes.

So, depending on what kind of sound you like, nothing or a helluva lot. Just don't be afraid to follow your ear.

And, by the way, if you've written a song in a major key, you're just playing major over it. That's it. You can't play Am over C - you're just playing a different position of the same notes. See if you tend to end your ideas on C... that's because you're playing in C major.
#9
Natural minor is sometimes referenced as the Aeolian mode.

I'm not too experienced with modes, but the simplest way I can explain it is a major scale in which you emphasize certain modal tones. i.e. B Phrygian looks exactly the same as a G Major scale, but because you emphasize the root as B instead of G, it sounds Phrygian. There are also other notes other than the root that you can emphasize that will give your playing a Phrygian flavor. Use your ear.
#10
Quote by dr83
Natural minor is sometimes referenced as the Aeolian mode.


Incorrectly. They're not the same thing, they just contain the same notes.
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