#1
Hi All, I don't know if this is the right place to post this but I wanna start playing Jazz but i don't really know were to start so partly i wanted to know what you think would be a good song to learn first. Also are there any specific techniques i should practice. Oh yeah and i've been playing for about 3 years but more Rock and Blues. thanks in advance
Guitars

Yamaha Pacifica 112v
Fender MiM Strat

Amps

Vox VT40+
Marshall MG15CDR

Quote by LeakyFlask
I know how it feels dude, none of my pickguards have guitars.


#2
lol Ive never heard if just jumping into jazz, I hope it works for you, but to answer your question simply without throwing in my opinion, St. Thomas is a simple song, in the key of C, although its originally 120-140 you can slow it down and its very simple and fun to improv over, almost anything works. also in many jazz improv's they utilize modes and chromatic movements quite often. You need to really, really learn the theory behind this or its just gonna sound like a bunch of wrong notes, but hopefully you wrap your head around it and it works out for ya
#3
The Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine is a really great place to start. It doesn't talk too much about 'comping, but goes into chord/scale theory really well and gives some tips on practicing for improvisation
#5
in no particular order:
-2-5-1s
-3-6-2-5-1s
-key changes
-understand your place in a jazz combo and the roles of the other instruments (walking basslines, swing drum beats, swung notes in general soloing, comping, trading 4s, 8s, and whatever else)
-improv
-expand what you know about blues (learn just about everything blues people do)
-chromatics and out-tones
-transpose jazz tunes
understand the history of jazz and different jazz styles (smooth jazz, bebop, hardbop, latin jazz, blues jazz, and modal jazz)
-understand how you may want to alter your playing if you're in a big band rather than a combo.
-become very fluent in sight-reading sheet music and lead sheets
-altered dominant chords
-altered scales for those altered dominant chords (modes of melodic minor and harmonic minor)
-bebop scales
Last edited by TMVATDI at May 1, 2011,
#6
Be on top of your theory and technique. Listen to a lot of jazz. Learn songs, pick them apart.

I'm sure the people at the Blues and Jazz forum can give you some help as well.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#7
Ok thanks guys, very helpful
Guitars

Yamaha Pacifica 112v
Fender MiM Strat

Amps

Vox VT40+
Marshall MG15CDR

Quote by LeakyFlask
I know how it feels dude, none of my pickguards have guitars.


#8
I'd say start with something like Take the A train. Theres basically 3 key centers, and only a couple changes to REALLY worry about.
it starts in C major (C major scale), and then the next chord is D7b5 (playing the C whole tone scale-- C D E F# G# A# (Bb) C works well over this chord), over the rest of the A section C major can work (though you may want to think D dorian or G mixolydian over the ii-Vs, or at least, think about C, going to B going to C over Dm7, G7, CM). The B section is just F major, then D 7 (think D mixolydian, D E F# G A B C), then it returns to C major for the last two bars, going into the last A section. The melody is very recognizable and singable. Try to work on playing lyrically, but also practice arpeggiating the chords, and running eighth notes through the progression.
if you want to check out some books, these are pretty good;
http://www.amazon.com/Vol-Play-Jazz-Improvise-Book/dp/B0002J6I8M
http://www.jazzbooks.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=JAJAZZ&Product_Code=JIS1&Category_Code=

also jazzguitar.be has a lot of good resources.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#9
Quote by sar8777
lol Ive never heard if just jumping into jazz



It happens all the time and is one of the better ways to do it, in my opinion.

Listen to jazz. I mean really listen to what's going on and feel the groove. Then, if possible, find a group(s) willing to jam with a jazz newbie and learn the basics from there. Once you get the feel of it a bit you can start doing the more analytical side.
#11
listen to wes montgomery, as he is what jazz lead guitar is meant to be
listen to Freddie Green, as he is what jazz rhythm guitar is meant to be

I take issue with both of those statements. jazz anything isn't meant to be one thing or another--moreover while playing like wes will rarely get you laughed off a bandstand (though theres plenty of other great jazz guitar players--Pat Metheny, Martino, Kurt Rosenwinkel, Joe Pass, Mikke Moreno), playing like freddie green in a combo situation will (also, if your playing big band stuff that isn't the bassie-swing style, its wildly inappropriate to comp like freddie green).
for comping, listen to pianists, guys like ahmad jamal, wynton kelly, herbie hancock mccoy tyner and bill evans for more traditional stuff. for more modern stuff, try to use voicings that are somewhat tonally ambiguous (voice the third and or seventh, with some tensions--but its more important to be melodic and interactive) some good more modern players to listen to are Aaron Parks, Ethan Iverson, Lyle Mays, Chick Corea and Robert Glasper (though thats by no means an end all be all list). For now, focus on voicings that contain the 1-3-7 of each chord, and eventually start adding 9ths and 13ths to those voicings, and getting into drop 2 voicings. play sparse rhtyhms, and don't worry about hitting every change, but adding to the soloists ideas.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)