#1
I have several books on music theory and I know all of them cover cadences but I haven't really found any material where I can apply it to the guitar and practice it.

I know how their function so I'm not here to talk about that, I'm just looking for sources to practice them, on the internet or other wise, or we can talk about how you guys practice them to be able to hear them when you listen to a song or whatever.
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#2
i don't know shit about cadences and my songs sound okay. the only cadence i've used is the V-I thing. do u think u'll really use them? that's an honest question, not me saying "don't use them," because idk shit about it so obviously i can't tell you how useful they are haha
#3
Tonal Harmony and an introduction to 20th century music

This is the book used by pretty much every serious music school and from personal experience it has a pretty good section on cadences, though nothing guitar specific and you would still be hard pressed to apply it usefully to guitar, its really just the theory behind it and how mozart and bach used them
#4
Quote by TDKshorty
I have several books on music theory and I know all of them cover cadences but I haven't really found any material where I can apply it to the guitar and practice it.

I know how their function so I'm not here to talk about that, I'm just looking for sources to practice them, on the internet or other wise, or we can talk about how you guys practice them to be able to hear them when you listen to a song or whatever.


Grab a song and start analyzing it, and discover where they are used, and how they work. In the Academy we grab as song and tear it apart and I show what's going on and why it works.

HEARING them by ear, I suppose means being familiar with keys and tendencies from a pitch collection relationship standpoint. For example I can hear any chord that falls outside diatonic harmony..instantly. I'd suggest practice on songs that you know are simple and diatonic, and then deriving the cadences are easy. For example, if something went to the V, did the V go to the I? If so, perfect. If not, deceptive.

Best,

Sean
#5
It deals also with the soprano note you use as well, so if you know how a cadence is formed (Ex. V to I in Cmajor that goes 7-1= B-C) with the soprano you should be able to apply it pretty easily
#7
Quote by Sean0913
Grab a song and start analyzing it, and discover where they are used, and how they work. In the Academy we grab as song and tear it apart and I show what's going on and why it works.

HEARING them by ear, I suppose means being familiar with keys and tendencies from a pitch collection relationship standpoint. For example I can hear any chord that falls outside diatonic harmony..instantly. I'd suggest practice on songs that you know are simple and diatonic, and then deriving the cadences are easy. For example, if something went to the V, did the V go to the I? If so, perfect. If not, deceptive.

Best,

Sean


So you're saying you know cadences so well that when something non-diatonic pops up in the progression you can tell?

Well I'm working in my Berklee Harmony book and I'm almost to cadences in the book so I'm focusing on just diatonic harmony right now, it's talking about root motion, so I'm learning the building blocks hah!
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#8
Quote by TDKshorty
So you're saying you know cadences so well that when something non-diatonic pops up in the progression you can tell?


yes, actually. but that doesn't really have much to do with cadences.

focus well on those building blocks. they're 90% of all practical composition.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#9
Would you guys be as kind to give me an example of something, so I can be certain I'm starting off the right way.

I can kind of hint at it myself ha! I know the basic Cadence that might be a I-IV-V or something and the V-I is the strongest Cadence, and that's a perfect Cadence if I'm not mistaken

so you could have a song that goes down in 5ths so you'd have something like this?

:Imaj7-IVmaj7: :Vii-7(b5)-iii-7:

Is that how I would write it out?

I'm going to come back with a fairly easy song in a bit to show you guys, to see if I'm right or not.


EDIT: Race for the Prize- Flaming Lips

Whaddya think??


Fmaj7      G*        Fmaj7        Cmaj7     X2

IVmaj7     V         IVmaj7       Imaj7

G6     G [B](Deceptive)[/B]
V6     V


C                    Am           G               C
I                    vi           V               I

Two scientists are racing for the good of all mankind

              F
             IV
Both of them side by side

C                      G [B](perfect)[/B]

I                      V

So determined

C                Am              G                C

I                vi              V                I
Locked in heated battle for the cure that is the prize

            F

           IV
but its so dangerous
[B](plagal cadance)[/B]

     C

     I
but they're determined


Chorus [B](ends in a half-cadence)
[/B]
Fmaj7

IVmaj7

Their's is to win

G

V

if it kills them

Fmaj7                    G

IVmaj7                   V

they're just humans with wives and children
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
Last edited by TDKshorty at May 2, 2011,
#10
Quote by TDKshorty
Would you guys be as kind to give me an example of something, so I can be certain I'm starting off the right way.

I can kind of hint at it myself ha! I know the basic Cadence that might be a I-IV-V or something and the V-I is the strongest Cadence, and that's a perfect Cadence if I'm not mistaken

so you could have a song that goes down in 5ths so you'd have something like this?

:Imaj7-IVmaj7: :Vii-7(b5)-iii-7:

Is that how I would write it out?

I'm going to come back with a fairly easy song in a bit to show you guys, to see if I'm right or not.


yeah, that's right, but there are no cadences there. how is this relevant? (or how did you intend this to be relevant?)
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#11
Quote by AeolianWolf
yeah, that's right, but there are no cadences there. how is this relevant? (or how did you intend this to be relevant?)


I was just wondering if that's how I would write it out ha, I guess I could've just said Roman Numerals
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#12
Make you're own cadence?
I like the III-I in minor keys
The perfect cadence also works well [duh] V-I
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#13
Cadences are ways to end a chord progression.
You have billions of cadences but not all have been wrote down.
But the most famous is the authentic and plagal cadence.
Authentic is V-I mostly the V has a dominant 7.
Plagal is IV-I
#14
Quote by liampje
Cadences are ways to end a chord progression.
You have billions of cadences but not all have been wrote down.
But the most famous is the authentic and plagal cadence.
Authentic is V-I mostly the V has a dominant 7.
Plagal is IV-I


....billions? there are actually only a few, the majority of them exploiting some kind of V-I/IV-I relationship.

if you want practice with cadences i'd try classical music, there's just so many sometimes it's like there's nothing else in it (looking at you ludwig), but they're easy to spot, and once you get some practice with them there, it'll be easier in more modern music, which admittedly might not help too much,k because a lot of music now doesn't have those conventional cadences. but hey, it can't hurt
Last edited by gavk at May 3, 2011,
#15
Quote by gavk
....billions? there are actually only a few, the majority of them exploiting some kind of V-I/IV-I relationship.

if you want practice with cadences i'd try classical music, there's just so many sometimes it's like there's nothing else in it (looking at you ludwig), but they're easy to spot, and once you get some practice with them there, it'll be easier in more modern music, which admittedly might not help too much,k because a lot of music now doesn't have those conventional cadences. but hey, it can't hurt

There are cadences that sound complete that don't even exist.
That's what someone told me in this forum.
#16
Quote by liampje
There are cadences that sound complete that don't even exist.
That's what someone told me in this forum.


not trying to be mean, but what on earth do you mean cadences that don't even exist?
Last edited by gavk at May 3, 2011,
#17
Quote by gavk
not trying to be mean, but what on earth do you mean cadences that don't even exist?

That haven't been discovered yet.
#19
Study 4-part harmony in classical music. That is a very good way of learning/understanding the theory behind it as they are, not always, clearly set out and is much easier to learn it that way than analysing cadences in more popular music (in my opinion!! before you all shoot me down). Grab a hold of some theory workbooks for grades from a local music store, and I guarantee there will be a section with many cadences to try. That would be my way around practising them (but thats probably because I have been doing Bach Chorale's all year for A-level music so i'm biased towards them).