#1
Aside from playing chromatics and excersises.

It takes me a good 2-3 hours of playing before im properly warmed up and playing at my 'full' potential.

I sometimes bath my hands in warm water and stretching and massaging, these only work sometimes but my hands/fingers always feel tense and tight.

Any other ways that could help? Thanks.
#3
The best way is to gradually warm your hands up, just playing random songs or whatnot; also putting your hands in warm water actually makes it worse!

If your fingers are always tight that could be due to smoking, as smoking reduces the size of blood vessels. A good way to loosen your fingers is to exercise more, thus increasing the effectiveness of your respiratory system!
#4
Would putting them in warm water not cause you to shred your fingers when playing?
#5
Quote by Conorhstone
The best way is to gradually warm your hands up, just playing random songs or whatnot; also putting your hands in warm water actually makes it worse!

If your fingers are always tight that could be due to smoking, as smoking reduces the size of blood vessels. A good way to loosen your fingers is to exercise more, thus increasing the effectiveness of your respiratory system!

^this

my warmup routine consists of songs usually begining with the simplest and moving more complex, slowly... I usually play like 4-5 songs.... then I'm ready to start whatever for the day...
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#6
Usually I do 1-2-3-4 exercises doing upstrokes, well because my upstroke sucks. then i just run through a couple scales. Doing different combinations with quarter, eighth, eighth triplets, sixteenths, and sixteenths triplets. with alt picking.

after that either play Holy Wars by Megadeth, or One by Metallica since these songs warm my right hand wrist really fast



Quote by Gunpowder
Thrashturbating? Most metal of all ways to pleasure oneself.
#7
I usually run through the pentatonic E minor scale backward and forward up the entire neck, then the diatonic, then the blues. While this might seem boring it forces my picking hand to maintain consistency since there are different picking patterns throughout the scale shapes.

After that I usually run through a couple of songs designed to warm my arm up to intense downpicking, for instance playing through Metallica's Four Horsemen, Master of Puppets, and then Disposable Heroes (in that order).

After that I am usually pretty warm, and a few legato exercises will fix the left hand if its still a little sluggish.
Axes:
2010 Carvin ST300C
1994 Jackson Soloist XL Professional
2008 "Jacksbanez"
2007 Gibson Flying V
2003 Epiphone Les Paul Plus

Amps:
Peavey 6505+ Combo
Peavey Classic 30
Peavey Vypyr 15