#1
Ok, I have always wondered how guitarists think of scales. Do you think of it as a shape of dots on your fret board? Or do you memorize where every note is on the guitar and then just play the ones pertaining to the scale? I want to make sure i do it the right way so that im not stuck playing shapes or so that im not putting all this effort into memorizing a bad habit.
#2
I would suggest that the latter option is best in the long run. If you start out by learning the notes on the fretboard and playing scales then shapes will become apparent to you.

I'd wager that a vast number of guitarists just think in terms of shapes. I know I do, but that was how I was taught and I'm now working on learning the fretboard notes. Its already improving the way I improvise.
#3
You want to not really memorize, per say, but just get the feel and the sound of the scales, that's whats most important, that and knowing the notes and how their relationship with the chords or bass underneath.

I wouldn't learn them in a box shape because that really limits you, most people that study them in positions end up with a limited sound, imo.
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
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Glowing in radiant madness
#4
Memorize the notes, and memorize the sounds. That way you can play in any tuning, any instrument, in any scale.
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Theory is descriptive, not prescriptive.


Quote by MiKe Hendryckz
theory states 1+1=2 sometimes in music 1+1=3.
#5
Quote by KYmonster
Ok, I have always wondered how guitarists think of scales. Do you think of it as a shape of dots on your fret board? Or do you memorize where every note is on the guitar and then just play the ones pertaining to the scale? I want to make sure i do it the right way so that im not stuck playing shapes or so that im not putting all this effort into memorizing a bad habit.


I know the notes on the fretboard
I see the shapes on the neck
I hear the sounds


Don't be afraid of shapes based on what you read here. Knowing the shapes helps you with both notes names and sounds. It gives you something visual to associate them with, which is very useful.

I've seen quite a few people claim that there is something wrong with learning shapes.... that they "limit" you somehow. I've never found this to be true. My guess is that some of these people make the mistake of blindly learning shapes, without connect them to the concepts they represent and out of the context of music. That IS bad, but the problem wasn't the learning of shapes.

remember that it takes time to take all this stuff in. (like years).
be patient, enjoy the process.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at May 2, 2011,
#7
Quote by KYmonster
Ok, I have always wondered how guitarists think of scales. Do you think of it as a shape of dots on your fret board? Or do you memorize where every note is on the guitar and then just play the ones pertaining to the scale? I want to make sure i do it the right way so that im not stuck playing shapes or so that im not putting all this effort into memorizing a bad habit.


I see and teach the entire neck as far as notes before I do anything else in regards to scales. As far as as scales I can see them on the entire neck, as a whole, regardless of key, fret or string. If it's exists on the neck I can see it. I suppose you could call it panoramic view of everything as a whole regardless of scale or key? I never really put a name to it, its just the way I see it and teach others to see it.

Best,

Sean
#8
I learnt via the CAGED method, whilst also learning the note names. Once I felt comfortable with the whole fretboard it sorta merged into one big pattern, and after that I just knew the sounds and could "feel" my way through the fretboard. This process just came naturally over many years of playing.

I wouldn't be too concerned with how others think or learn, just do what works for you.


And always remember........

No modes.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#9
I think in shapes most of the time, and wish I didn't.

However, don't let that influence you. Shapes can be a good thing.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#10
I try to play them without shapes, it's getting more natural to me now I play more than just in one shape but more shapes at once.
Try to learn the sharps and the flats first.
Then you can try to play them all over the place.
EDIT: this thread made me realize that I need to actually learn every scale.
http://www.learnmusicfree.com/lesson/fundamentals/images/circle_of_fifths.jpg
As you can see the circle starts on C which has no sharps then F and G which both have one accidental, and as you get more towards F# and Gb they get more accidentals.
And these patterns also move in fifths if you didn't notice.
Last edited by liampje at May 3, 2011,
#12
Quote by Myshadow46_2
FYI Scales do not contain accidentals. Notes outside of the scale are accidentals.

Yes but if they are in the key signature they are actually called accidental.
#13
Quote by liampje
Yes but if they are in the key signature they are actually called accidental.


no they're not. if i'm in A major and i play and F# then and F natural, the F natural is the accidental, not the F#.
#14
I wish i lernd the frets on the board but i keep changing my tuning so i derpd de derp lernd patterns and box.
lol guitar
#15
Quote by Serpentarius
I wish i lernd the frets on the board but i keep changing my tuning so i derpd de derp lernd patterns and box.


Can you re-word the bit in bold? I can't work out what derp means!

I find it good to learn a scale one string at a time, visualising it as a series of intervals on the string. Knowing the intervalic distance between strings speeds this up. E.g. on the D string the intervals will be shifted 2 frets to the right from those on the E string.