#1
I remember a few years back (must be at least 5 now) my friend had just bought a new guitar. It was a Gretsch if I remember correctly, but I may be wrong. Beautiful guitar. Anyway, I remember him showing me this feature, he had a pull push switch on one of the vol/tone knobs and if he had his amp on the distortion mode, pushing/pulling the switch would make it sound clean, or possibly the other way around. Can't really remember.

What is this called? Or was I dreaming and it never happened? Although I'm pretty sure it did...o_O
Gear
ESP LTD EC-1000 Vintage Black - Orange Tiny Terror Combo

Tama Superstar Custom Hyperdrive w/ Sabian Cymbals
#3
Quote by imaan988
I remember a few years back (must be at least 5 now) my friend had just bought a new guitar. It was a Gretsch if I remember correctly, but I may be wrong. Beautiful guitar. Anyway, I remember him showing me this feature, he had a pull push switch on one of the vol/tone knobs and if he had his amp on the distortion mode, pushing/pulling the switch would make it sound clean, or possibly the other way around. Can't really remember.

What is this called? Or was I dreaming and it never happened? Although I'm pretty sure it did...o_O



Its called a push/pull switch ...

And it usually works with a humbucker and when you pull up the switch it produces a single coil sound bu cutting it in half. I think
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#4
Ah, I see haha. Fair enough. I was thinking about it, and I found it odd because I'd never heard of anything like that on a guitar before. Styker I don't think it was built into the guitar itself, cause I believe he was still using the distortion on his amp.

Madd, is that coil-tapping your talking about?
Gear
ESP LTD EC-1000 Vintage Black - Orange Tiny Terror Combo

Tama Superstar Custom Hyperdrive w/ Sabian Cymbals
#5
EMG makes a boost that can be built into a guitar, but I think that ones a toggle not a push pull
#6
yah coil tap is the proper term.

BUT im sure its possible to set up the emg type preamp with a push/pull as well. Maybe he did have one. But thats not too common and probably sounds like doo doo.

I think Ibanez should get into this for a tube screamer type push/pull on guitars.
Reverbnation.com/offthewitness
#7
Quote by imaan988
Ah, I see haha. Fair enough. I was thinking about it, and I found it odd because I'd never heard of anything like that on a guitar before. Styker I don't think it was built into the guitar itself, cause I believe he was still using the distortion on his amp.

Madd, is that coil-tapping your talking about?

With humbuckers, it's usually coil-splitting instead of coil-tapping, since the former is easier to realise for the humbucker-manufacturer. Coil-tapping is sometimes found on high-output single-coils (seen it on a couple of hotter P90s, for example).

Either reduces the output the guitar produces, which means less distortion produced once the signal hits the amp. There's also other ways of achieving this - usually you'd just send some of the pickups' signal to ground, i.e. by rolling down your guitar's volume pot.

I don't know the guitar though so I can't tell you what method it utilises, or if it has some built-in distortion or any shenanigans like that.
Last edited by TheQuailman at May 2, 2011,
#8
Quote by TheQuailman
With humbuckers, it's usually coil-splitting instead of coil-tapping, since the former is easier to realise for the humbucker-manufacturer. Coil-tapping is sometimes found on high-output single-coils (seen it on a couple of hotter P90s, for example).

Either reduces the output the guitar produces, which means less distortion produced once the signal hits the amp. There's also other ways of achieving this - usually you'd just send some of the pickups' signal to ground, i.e. by rolling down your guitar's volume pot.

I don't know the guitar though so I can't tell you what method it utilises, or if it has some built-in distortion or any shenanigans like that.



ahaa the splitter not the tapper.
Reverbnation.com/offthewitness
#9
He's not talking about a coil tap. Lets get the story clear though: You're saying your friend had a guitar that, upon the push or pull of a knob, would activate the distortion inside his amp? I want to make sure we're not talking about adding a humbucker into the signal, because that will probably over drive a well set tube amp, but if you're saying it activated an option on his amplifier, for the in amp distortion, than we are not talking about a coil tap.

The only thing that I can think of, would be that his amp was an odd ball amp and the push/pull knob acted as a double pull/double throw toggle switch for the amps distortion. I feel like that would need some very special cables, jacks and circuitry to pull off though. Is it impossible, no, but I think it would be much more helpful to know what kind of amp he was using at the time.
#10
Maybe something like this?
Quote by CodChick


Seriously, I'm not a fan of iphones and guitars mixing.
#11
Quote by TheQuailman
With humbuckers, it's usually coil-splitting instead of coil-tapping, since the former is easier to realise for the humbucker-manufacturer. Coil-tapping is sometimes found on high-output single-coils (seen it on a couple of hotter P90s, for example).

Either reduces the output the guitar produces, which means less distortion produced once the signal hits the amp. There's also other ways of achieving this - usually you'd just send some of the pickups' signal to ground, i.e. by rolling down your guitar's volume pot.

I don't know the guitar though so I can't tell you what method it utilises, or if it has some built-in distortion or any shenanigans like that.

Whats the difference between splitting and tapping?
#12
Rivers Cuomo had something very similar, give me a minute to google it.

Edit: It was called the black ice module and was very similar to what ecvMatt posted. I don't think this fits your description now though
Last edited by kaptink at May 2, 2011,
#13
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Whats the difference between splitting and tapping?

Split: One coil of a humbucker is taken out of the circuit, rendering it a single coil. This means less output and single-coil tone - though in most cases, it doesn't sound nearly as good as a "real" single coil pickup. It tends to work better with high-output humbuckers than with low-output, vintage-voiced ones. Equipping a humbucker with the wires for splitting is cheap and easy for manufacturers. Naturally, this can't be done with single coils.


Tap: Part of the wire wound around the bobbin is taken out of the circuit, giving you a pickup that has less winds and therefore less dc-resistence, which means less output and (commonly) less low-end. This is a bit trickier to manufacture, but you'll find it on some single coils, since a split isn't an option with them. It's rarely found on humbuckers, as equipping them with a splitting option is easier and gives a more drastic change in tone. Contrary to splits though, taps tend to sound very nice (you can make a shitty sounding tap of course... haven't encountered any so far though!).


Marketing can be misleading in this case, since a lot of guitar manufacturers will label their split-equipped guitars as tap-equipped. I don't know of any big pup manufacturer like Duncan or Dimarzio that makes humbuckers with actual taps.

I guess if you're pedantic, you could refer to a split as a tap since it technically is a form of tap, but typically tap refers to what I've described above.
#14
I have a Split in one of my guitars, and it certainly dosen't make my guitar clean. Just has the tone of a single coil.
#16
Don't Manson build distortion units in the Matt Bellamy guitars?

There is also a Danelectro with a distortion switch on the scratchplate (forget the model's name but it looks like a warped Strat, even to the three single coils).
It's an opinion. It's subjective. And I'm right, anyway.
#18
Or silliness extremis:

From Gibson, no less.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#19
Quote by TheQuailman
Split: One coil of a humbucker is taken out of the circuit, rendering it a single coil. This means less output and single-coil tone - though in most cases, it doesn't sound nearly as good as a "real" single coil pickup. It tends to work better with high-output humbuckers than with low-output, vintage-voiced ones. Equipping a humbucker with the wires for splitting is cheap and easy for manufacturers. Naturally, this can't be done with single coils.


Tap: Part of the wire wound around the bobbin is taken out of the circuit, giving you a pickup that has less winds and therefore less dc-resistence, which means less output and (commonly) less low-end. This is a bit trickier to manufacture, but you'll find it on some single coils, since a split isn't an option with them. It's rarely found on humbuckers, as equipping them with a splitting option is easier and gives a more drastic change in tone. Contrary to splits though, taps tend to sound very nice (you can make a shitty sounding tap of course... haven't encountered any so far though!).


Marketing can be misleading in this case, since a lot of guitar manufacturers will label their split-equipped guitars as tap-equipped. I don't know of any big pup manufacturer like Duncan or Dimarzio that makes humbuckers with actual taps.

I guess if you're pedantic, you could refer to a split as a tap since it technically is a form of tap, but typically tap refers to what I've described above.

Thanks for clearing that