#1
How fast should you be able to change between chords? For example I practice changing from G to F, how fast should i get that? Is 200 bpm to much or not enough, what do you guys think?
#2
How fast should a shredder shred? You can always be faster, but whether it serves any practical purpose to do so is always debatable.
#3
Not fast enough.. try playing this song i wrote it's called trolls delight!

heres the progression

A F Bb Gm E C D A Bm C Bm A Bm Bb Bm Cm Cb C Cbm A

played at 883 bmp change the chord every click

its pretty easy though
#4
Quote by cm880999
Not fast enough.. try playing this song i wrote it's called trolls delight!

heres the progression

A F Bb Gm E C D A Bm C Bm A Bm Bb Bm Cm Cb C Cbm A

played at 883 bmp change the chord every click

its pretty easy though


Trolls Delight...

Sir, you have just won a quote in my signature.
Quote by cm880999
Not fast enough.. try playing this song i wrote it's called trolls delight!

heres the progression

A F Bb Gm E C D A Bm C Bm A Bm Bb Bm Cm Cb C Cbm A

played at 883 bmp change the chord every click

its pretty easy though
#5
The numbers don't matter so stop worrying about them.

How fast do you need to be able to change chords? As fast as the next song you want to play needs you to be.
Actually called Mark!

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#6
Quote by steven seagull
The numbers don't matter so stop worrying about them.

How fast do you need to be able to change chords? As fast as the next song you want to play needs you to be.

^this if you only need to be able to change at 90bpm how does it help you to force yourself to be able to change at 250bpm? answer, it doesn't.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#7
Quote by krypticguitar87
^this if you only need to be able to change at 90bpm how does it help you to force yourself to be able to change at 250bpm? answer, it doesn't.



Actually, being able to play faster than you really need to is a BIG help. Why play at your limit? If you're performing and you're nervous, any mild tension you may have will really show up and probably **** you up if you're playing at your limit because you're concentrating on playing. If you're able to play a piece at least 20 BPM faster than you're going to perform it live, generally, you'll almost always do better than if you're playing at your absolute maximum.
#8
Quote by XianXiuHong
Actually, being able to play faster than you really need to is a BIG help. Why play at your limit?


Yes. But don't you think 250bpm compared to 90bpm is being a little over-cautious?

If you want to spend weeks being able to change chords ridiculously fast then go ahead, but track how much time it takes you to get there then think what you could have leart in that time instead. Then I bet you will regret doing it.
#9
Quote by cm880999
Not fast enough.. try playing this song i wrote it's called trolls delight!

heres the progression

A F Bb Gm E C D A Bm C Bm A Bm Bb Bm Cm Cb C Cbm A

played at 883 bmp change the chord every click

its pretty easy though


Really? 883 bpm? that seems ridiculously stupidly fast.
My thing only goes up to 208 bpm, so how am I supposed to set that?
#10
Quote by XianXiuHong
Actually, being able to play faster than you really need to is a BIG help. Why play at your limit? If you're performing and you're nervous, any mild tension you may have will really show up and probably **** you up if you're playing at your limit because you're concentrating on playing. If you're able to play a piece at least 20 BPM faster than you're going to perform it live, generally, you'll almost always do better than if you're playing at your absolute maximum.

True, but learning to play something and play it well usually means you could play it faster if you needed to.

My point is the number itself is irrelevant, all that really matters is that you are able to play the music you want to comfortably and accurately - that's what you're actually aiming to do, that's your true goal. Misguidedly fixating on things that don't really matter like metronome numbers just distracts you from the important stuff IMO.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#11
Quote by Steve635z
Yes. But don't you think 250bpm compared to 90bpm is being a little over-cautious?

If you want to spend weeks being able to change chords ridiculously fast then go ahead, but track how much time it takes you to get there then think what you could have leart in that time instead. Then I bet you will regret doing it.



Perhaps way beyond 'cautious' and spanning into ridiculous but I just wanted to make the point of not playing at your limit which many people tend to do when they say they can play at x BPM.

I wouldn't regret spending lots of time on one aspect of technique as long as it applied to many musical contexts. For something like chord changes, being able to change chords quite quickly would be something that happens in some jazz music. If TS ever wants to get into jazz, they'll already have some solid foundation in chord changes and won't have to work as hard as someone who didn't practice chord changes and the different shapes that come with the style.

Quote by steven seagull
True, but learning to play something and play it well usually means you could play it faster if you needed to.


I agree with that but stage nerves can totally change the ball game for otherwise accurate and relaxed players. IMO, knowing you will be able to play faster than you really need to is a good 'peace of mind' sort of thing where you know you can play it at x tempo normally but at the performance you'll play it at x-10 or something. I don't know, there's just some feeling of security it gives me (and Simon Powis!)
#12
Quote by XianXiuHong
Actually, being able to play faster than you really need to is a BIG help. Why play at your limit? If you're performing and you're nervous, any mild tension you may have will really show up and probably **** you up if you're playing at your limit because you're concentrating on playing. If you're able to play a piece at least 20 BPM faster than you're going to perform it live, generally, you'll almost always do better than if you're playing at your absolute maximum.


my point is that if you can already do it accurately why push yourself to some ridiculous standard? you only need to be able to change chords as fast as the fastest song you play requires you to. I'm not saying to never go above tempo because I typically learn a song to be able to play it 10-20 bpm faster than the song is, but I don't need to be able to play that fast.

also if you atually learn a song you should be able to play it 10-20 bpm faster anyway (since for many songs that really isn't much faster). which brings me back to my oringal point is how does it actually help to be able to change chords (note that this is only one aspect of playing, not the entirety of all songs) @ 250bpm when the fastest you need to is @ 90bpm? and the answer is still that it doesn't, the time spent gaining speed on chord changes at that point could, and probably should, have been spent elsewhere. like, you know, every other technique, since you probably didn't spend much time on anything else in order to change chords that quickly.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.