#2
"Perfect pitch" is something that very few people are born with. And you have to be born with it.

However the rest of us can develop their "relative pitch" to an extreme point where it can get close to the "perfect pitch" level, but never right on point. It's all debatable, I probably have better pitch recognition than a truck driver who was born with "perfect pitch" but never used it.

If you want to develop it, just learn your scales, the sounds of the notes and intervals, and apply it to music. Perfect pitch or highly developed relative pitch don't alone make you a good musician, it just helps you recognise specific notes and intervals.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
Quote by AlanHB
"Perfect pitch" is something that very few people are born with. And you have to be born with it.


not quite so. perfect pitch is a learned skill. however, it is generally learned at a time when the ears are more susceptible -- such as late infancy. it's usually acquired through exposure to perfectly tuned pianos throughout the early ages. however, it's nearly impossible to develop at this stage in your life.

suffice it to say - for the average person, if you can fully comprehend your native language, you're already passed the window period.

Quote by AlanHB
However the rest of us can develop their "relative pitch" to an extreme point where it can get close to the "perfect pitch" level, but never right on point. It's all debatable, I probably have better pitch recognition than a truck driver who was born with "perfect pitch" but never used it.

If you want to develop it, just learn your scales, the sounds of the notes and intervals, and apply it to music. Perfect pitch or highly developed relative pitch don't alone make you a good musician, it just helps you recognise specific notes and intervals.


this is probably the best advise you'll get on the subject.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#4
Quote by AeolianWolf
not quite so. perfect pitch is a learned skill. however, it is generally learned at a time when the ears are more susceptible -- such as late infancy. it's usually acquired through exposure to perfectly tuned pianos throughout the early ages. however, it's nearly impossible to develop at this stage in your life.


Hey that's interesting, maybe I'll go make a baby and run intervals and scales past it every day for 5 years. I'll bump this thread in 15 and I'll tell ya how it went.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#5
id imagine it would be possible--but extremely dificult, and probably not worth it. good relative pitch will get you just as far--most of the best musicians didn't have perfect pitch, but highly developed relative pitch. perfect pitch is great if you developed it at a very young age, but at this stage of the game, go for great relative pitch.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#6
learn your intervals. when you hear a note calculate it from the start of rachmaninov's C# minor prelude, no way in hell anyone can mistake that first A!

but yeah, as people said, develop relative pitch, it's all that's necessary, in fact perfect pitch doesn't really help you all that more other than for bragging rights or if your blind, which i presume your not, but could be wrong.

relative pitch is where it's at.
#7
^I just imagined that prelude, and managed to make it start with an F#

I'LL PUNCH A DONKEY IN THE STREETS OF GALWAY
#8
I recall a study which found that speakers of tonal languages are 9 times more likely to have perfect pitch than speakers of non tonal languages. There may be a genetic trait which lends itself to learning perfect pitch though.

I think it would be possible to learn at any age, but if you haven't learnt it by the age of ten then it'll take much more effort than it's worth. From what I've seen, the main method used to learn it is to associate colour with pitch. I doubt whether this is effective though.
#9
Quote by Jesse Clarkson
I recall a study which found that speakers of tonal languages are 9 times more likely to have perfect pitch than speakers of non tonal languages. There may be a genetic trait which lends itself to learning perfect pitch though.

I think it would be possible to learn at any age, but if you haven't learnt it by the age of ten then it'll take much more effort than it's worth. From what I've seen, the main method used to learn it is to associate colour with pitch. I doubt whether this is effective though.


yup koreans, speakers of mandarin or cantonese and vietnamese etc. vietnamese has like 9 tones for the one syllabil, that's just an unfair advantage right there!

not japanese or togalog or other off shore asian languages which is kinda cool.
#10
Quote by theunforgivn
Hello UG

I'm wanting to learn how to have Perfect Pitch (where someone can play any note and you can tell them what not it is just by the sound). I'm going to ask my music teacher if she can help teach me, But do you guys have any tips?


tip... don't worry about perfect pitch.

I understand that the idea of having some kind "perfect" skill is alluring, but I honestly think you'd better off if you just listening and practicing your instrument often.

Music composition is about the relationship of pitches ....... that's what you want to be able to hear.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at May 3, 2011,
#11
Quote by gavk
yup koreans, speakers of mandarin or cantonese and vietnamese etc. vietnamese has like 9 tones for the one syllabil, that's just an unfair advantage right there!

not japanese or togalog or other off shore asian languages which is kinda cool.


korean isn't really a tonal language. it's just as tonal as japanese.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#12
Quote by AeolianWolf
korean isn't really a tonal language. it's just as tonal as japanese.


really? oh i thought it was tonal as well, my bad
#13
Quote by gavk
yup koreans, speakers of mandarin or cantonese and vietnamese etc. vietnamese has like 9 tones for the one syllabil, that's just an unfair advantage right there!

not japanese or togalog or other off shore asian languages which is kinda cool.

I actually have a hard time hearing the separate tones in the Vietnamese language My girlfriend tries to teach me and I keep hearing them repeat the same word over and over...

#14
Quote by DiminishedFifth
I actually have a hard time hearing the separate tones in the Vietnamese language My girlfriend tries to teach me and I keep hearing them repeat the same word over and over...



yeah i know i was struggling like hell with the 4 in mandarin, i got paranoid that i was tone deaf cos i couldn't differentiate between them, i feel your pain!
#15
Perfect pitch can be obtained. Anyone who claims otherwise is wrong for I have witnessed with my own eyes.

My dad got that Perfect Pitch cd set, took him about 9-10 months. Now I can sit with him facing the wall and he can tell me every chord and note I play with ease. Before he never could do anything close to that.
#16
Quote by Majin Gaara
Perfect pitch can be obtained. Anyone who claims otherwise is wrong for I have witnessed with my own eyes.


Read our posts again. We haven't said it's "impossible" to obtain perfect pitch, but highly unlikely if you haven't been trained during infancy. Even if not you can improve your relative pitch to the point where it's nearly the same.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#17
Quote by Majin Gaara
Perfect pitch can be obtained. Anyone who claims otherwise is wrong for I have witnessed with my own eyes.

My dad got that Perfect Pitch cd set, took him about 9-10 months. Now I can sit with him facing the wall and he can tell me every chord and note I play with ease. Before he never could do anything close to that.


really?!

hm...maybe i'll try again with that set. damn, i shouldn't have given up.

i'll start again later this month, and i'll let you guys know if there's any objective progress.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#19
Quote by Joshua1207
Man, we get these perfect pitch threads almost as much as mode threads I swear.


really? i can't even remember the last time i saw one, it's funny the things people become fascinated with while neglecting some things

basically "lets use modes, get perfect pitch! basic tonal harmony? pft."
Last edited by gavk at May 4, 2011,
#20
I read few books about how to become perfetct pitch, so of course we can learn it.

Sing every notes that you play and analyze... And it would be better to use keyboard I think.. because the notes never dissonant .... don't need to tune.
#21
Quote by bernardlefty
I read few books about how to become perfetct pitch, so of course we can learn it.

Sing every notes that you play and analyze... And it would be better to use keyboard I think.. because the notes never dissonant .... don't need to tune.


just because someone wrote a book on it doesn't mean it's possible, or maybe i'm just a skeptic

although really how far can you take it? surely if you had proper perfect pitch, you could tell the difference between an Ab and an A quarter flat...?
#22
Perfect pitch can be obtained very easily in fact I think the main reason why people can't develop it when they try is because they try too hard. From the time when you heard your first sound to about now where your probably an established musician, you brain has been creating this way of thinking and a way of approaching different pitches. You have to try to loosen this mental 'image' to a point where you stop thinking so vertically (how high or low something is) and more of a rounded approach to pitch (this pitch feels mellow[not to be confused with sad or minor] or its twangy etc) Eventually once you get good at it you start understanding the true importance of different keys because they all have a different feel. For me C maj feels childish and innocent because its what most of us heard from a young age. This ability adds to how you listen to music because its another thing to appreciate in addition to things like timbre, style, rhythm, form and texture. This experience alone, IMO, is way better than just being able to identify a pitch because it doesnt take that long to match a pitch with your instrument.

** Im on 16 and I spent the last few months developing it. I used a few lessons of David Lucas Berge perfect pitch but I stopped because I really wanted to develop it with my own ideas to maximize my ability.

Remember the key is to stretch the way you think of pitch, and to stay relaxed and not try at all when listening.
Last edited by phil-82 at May 5, 2011,