#2
often referred to in the jazz world. Sometimes playing isn't about being the most show offy or extravagant but being perfectly in rhythm with the band, being "tight" and doing your part to have a great full band sound.
#3
Quote by kagendew
often referred to in the jazz world. Sometimes playing isn't about being the most show offy or extravagant but being perfectly in rhythm with the band, being "tight" and doing your part to have a great full band sound.


So this is just another term for following the music then?
#4
Its like being in the groove of the music and just feeling it. All the musicians who are "feeling it" with each other are said to be in the pocket
#5
I see...So any tips on being "in the pocket" so to speak?

Things to avoid and other stuff...I'm generally more the blast beat type of drummer so I don't know if I can apply this to metal or something.
#6
When I think of playing in the pocket, I think of synchronization with the guitars/bass. Everytime the kick or snare hits, the guitar/bass hits a note at the same time. It makes for a very tight sound. A good application to metal is when there are groove parts in a song. The kick or snare will hit every time the guitar and bass chugs.

To me, playing in the pocket is something that seperates good drummers from average drummer. It means they are locking in to the song, and are memorizing parts note for note, as opposed to just improvising over a basic idea of what should be happening in an area of the song.
#7
I'm a bassist primarily and a drummer second, but me and the drummer from my jazz band have talked alot about this. You really want to be feeling the pulse of the music and playing the music, not just the drums. For me and him as a pair, I try to listen to his hi hat and ride patterns (especially in funk music the ride is important) and he pays attention to my root notes.

Playing in synchronization is one thing, but I find what really defines being in the pocket is when he and I can fill each others spaces - for example, syncopating the ride so it fills the gaps in my basslines, as well as meeting up with me on the pulse. As far as I'm concerned, that's when he and I are most locked in and in the pocket.
#8
Thanks I guess I got more to learn other than blasting the song to oblivion
#10
Quote by gothblade
I see...So any tips on being "in the pocket" so to speak?

Things to avoid and other stuff...I'm generally more the blast beat type of drummer so I don't know if I can apply this to metal or something.
It wouldn't really apply to blast beats, but for slower, more classic heavy metal or Meshuggah-esque stuff, definitely.

As for working on being in the pocket... not really. You just feel it.