#1
A few week ago I could play better at higher speed. But now it's hard to play even at moderate high speeds. Why it happened?

It really annoys me. I play on guitar since I'm 13 (now I'm 20) and still need to pass the leads. Sometimes I really want to smash my guitar. I don't want to play in a band, where there is no solos. (eg. indie, nu metal (alrought I listen it ), alternative rock) I want to play a more technical music, with musical depth.

I masterised the higy speed throught using metronome. It took me a lot time, I also got tendonitis, almost being fired from the scool because I cared a lot more about guitar than learning. Then I got the tendonitis, I had to suspend for a month. It wouldn't a big problem, but a few weeks ago I was a bit more lazy. Then it became harder.

What should be a big help?

Some people said that I should stay at slow tempos (and it's makes me feel like an impotent guy). And other guys saying, that I should practice at very slow tempos and I will gain speed automatically (without metronome). Would this last one works?

EDIT: It's a bit paradoxical, but I don't have problems with picking (even with sweeps). I think I having more problem with my fretting hand. I use economy picking.
Last edited by ZILtoid_1991 at May 3, 2011,
#2
Its called not practicing regularly.
If you shred one day, then dont play for a week, OBVIOUSLY you'll suck.
Been there, done that. Now I can shred my ass off
EDIT: Start slow. And learn alternate picking before economy.

Suggestion. Learn the shred solos off "In The Presence Of Enemies" Part I (Dream Theater).
Plain alternate picking at insane speeds.
To put it in perspective, it took me a month to learn the first shred solo just before the vocals come on. And it took a year before I could get my alt picking to the stage where I alt pick anything and everything without even thinking.
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at May 3, 2011,
#3
I read the "Sticky: Read me beginners!" which says these things:
- The best speed exercise is not to think and exercise on speed
- The speed usually goes after months or years

So
- I can play scales about at 180 beats per second (and three notes per beat) because I took a lot speed excercise. Is it was a big waste of time or it can be useful? I think I have a good syncronisation between my hands (but sadly, it didn't reached the 400% sync ratio ), but somehow I became slower and it's only my limits. And it's a bit hard.
- How fast can I progress on the guitar if I'm practise minimum of 2 (or because the school exams, it may much less for a time) hours? I don't want to be excluded from bands forever as I want to play progressive metal instead of grunge/nu metal/indie/alternative (but somehow I thinking on forming an industrial/nu metal band, but almost all my ideas can't really fit into this genre, maybe some M.A.N-ish thing will occur).
#4
Quote by ZILtoid_1991
I read the "Sticky: Read me beginners!" which says these things:
- The best speed exercise is not to think and exercise on speed
- The speed usually goes after months or years

So
- I can play scales about at 180 beats per second (and three notes per beat) because I took a lot speed excercise. Is it was a big waste of time or it can be useful? I think I have a good syncronisation between my hands (but sadly, it didn't reached the 400% sync ratio ), but somehow I became slower and it's only my limits. And it's a bit hard.
- How fast can I progress on the guitar if I'm practise minimum of 2 (or because the school exams, it may much less for a time) hours? I don't want to be excluded from bands forever as I want to play progressive metal instead of grunge/nu metal/indie/alternative (but somehow I thinking on forming an industrial/nu metal band, but almost all my ideas can't really fit into this genre, maybe some M.A.N-ish thing will occur).


Do this.
Play like mad for two days. To the extent that your hands hurt.
That is a must. Your hands MUST hurt. Not too much, but enough to feel as if you are pushing beyond your limits. THe type of hurt as when youre playing for god only knows how long without a break. Not the carpel Tunnel type.
THen take one day off. That is necessary for damaged muscles to heal properly.
Give or take 3 months, you should be able to shred well.

And pay attention to the song I mentioned. I learnt shreddinf from it
#5
grammar.
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#6
Quote by funkbass369
grammar.

What's wrong with it? Please be costructive and correct it!
#7
Now I've reallized, that I have problems with finger independence. Somehow I feel my left hand isn't mine. Sometimes I use my other finger that I had to and fretting a wrong note.
I also had problems with right hand mute when playing single notes, I overcame it fastly.
#9
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Do this.
Play like mad for two days. To the extent that your hands hurt.
That is a must. Your hands MUST hurt
. Not too much, but enough to feel as if you are pushing beyond your limits. THe type of hurt as when youre playing for god only knows how long without a break. Not the carpel Tunnel type.
THen take one day off. That is necessary for damaged muscles to heal properly.
Give or take 3 months, you should be able to shred well.

And pay attention to the song I mentioned. I learnt shreddinf from it

Jesus christ what kind of shit is this?

I actually want you to be trolling, because this is quite possible the most retarded piece of "advice" I'ved ever seen.

Don't post this kind of crap again please.

TS, the "problem" isn't a problem at all - the fact is you're not a machine. You're going to have up days and down days, both physically and mentally so you're not always going to be able to play consistently at the upper limit of your abilities.

So what do you do? Simple, you keep practicing and keep working on everything, from the basics through to the flashy stuff, and you keep maintaining your standards. As you get better and better then your limits increase, therefore more and more stuff gradually moves from being on the limit to being more comfortable for you.

You're right in your conclusion that running up and down scales is a waste of time - it is. How fast you can run up and down a scale doesn't mean shit in the greater scheme of things, and getting hung up on metronome numbers is counter-productive as it distracts you from the real goal. You don't practice to get better at practicing, you practice to get better at playing, so the true test is whether or not your practicing is having a beneficial effect on your ability to play things.

You've also mentioned you're having sync issues, again that boils down to not practicing enough and not practicing in the right way. You have to perfect things at slower speeds before bringing them up to full tempo, you can't just keep trying to play fast and hoping the mistakes will drop out in the wash because they won't.
Actually called Mark!

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#10
Quote by GS LEAD 5
Do this.
Play like mad for two days. To the extent that your hands hurt.
That is a must. Your hands MUST hurt. Not too much, but enough to feel as if you are pushing beyond your limits. THe type of hurt as when youre playing for god only knows how long without a break. Not the carpel Tunnel type.
THen take one day off. That is necessary for damaged muscles to heal properly.
Give or take 3 months, you should be able to shred well.

And pay attention to the song I mentioned. I learnt shreddinf from it


THIS, THIS, ****ING THIS!

i spent an entire year adamantly doing 4 hours of practice a day to a metronome, increasing 1 bpm every 2 days and barely improved. you need days off, you need rests. take a day or 2 off every once in a while.

*bitter as ****
"Never say never."
-Justin Bieber
#11
Quote by steven seagull
Jesus christ what kind of shit is this?

I actually want you to be trolling, because this is quite possible the most retarded piece of "advice" I'ved ever seen.

Don't post this kind of crap again please.

TS, the "problem" isn't a problem at all - the fact is you're not a machine. You're going to have up days and down days, both physically and mentally so you're not always going to be able to play consistently at the upper limit of your abilities.

So what do you do? Simple, you keep practicing and keep working on everything, from the basics through to the flashy stuff, and you keep maintaining your standards. As you get better and better then your limits increase, therefore more and more stuff gradually moves from being on the limit to being more comfortable for you.

You're right in your conclusion that running up and down scales is a waste of time - it is. How fast you can run up and down a scale doesn't mean shit in the greater scheme of things, and getting hung up on metronome numbers is counter-productive as it distracts you from the real goal. You don't practice to get better at practicing, you practice to get better at playing, so the true test is whether or not your practicing is having a beneficial effect on your ability to play things.

You've also mentioned you're having sync issues, again that boils down to not practicing enough and not practicing in the right way. You have to perfect things at slower speeds before bringing them up to full tempo, you can't just keep trying to play fast and hoping the mistakes will drop out in the wash because they won't.

um? I only noticed big improvements only when my fingertips burnt. If it didnt reach that stage, I rarely if ever noticed anything. I wasnt talking about muscle pain at all. Sorry if the post was a bit unclear.
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at May 4, 2011,
#12
Quote by GS LEAD 5
um? I only noticed big improvements only when my fingertips burnt. If it didnt reach that stage, I rarely if ever noticed anything. I wasnt talking about muscle pain at all. Sorry if the post was a bit unclear.



Any pain in your wrists or fingers is bad regardless of what "kind of pain" you think it is.

Playing guitar isn't like lifting weights buddy.
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This +10000

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#13
You got tendinitis? From guitar?

That means your playing wrong... Do you play with your thumb above the neck? I know a lot of self taught blues guitarists say its fine to keep your thumb above the neck instead of on the back, but it will give you tendinitis if that is how you always play.

Hand position, posture, and relaxing are very important to guitar.
#14
Quote by hansome21
You got tendinitis? From guitar?

That means your playing wrong... Do you play with your thumb above the neck? I know a lot of self taught blues guitarists say its fine to keep your thumb above the neck instead of on the back, but it will give you tendinitis if that is how you always play.

Hand position, posture, and relaxing are very important to guitar.


i've been always playing with my thumb over the neck for 8 years now and my hand has never hurt or developed any symptoms of tendinitis.
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#15
Quote by Bryc3e
Any pain in your wrists or fingers is bad regardless of what "kind of pain" you think it is.

Playing guitar isn't like lifting weights buddy.


I honestly dont get it at all.
I I play at speed where I'm perfectly comfortable with, any increase in the bpm results in slight pain in the fingers. Ignoring it results in the feelings going away after ten fifteen minutes and taking a quick five minute break after the onset of the pain helps a lot. I've been working on "In The Presence Of Enemies Part 1", fot the Pits guitar player thing, getting the solo upto speed involved playing faster. It always hurts I push. Goes away after a while. Its like sore legs after walking a lot. And after a while, say, 20 minutes of pushing it like that, suddenly I'm able to play the solo perfectly. This always happens, whether is a shred solo or a chugga chugga riff.
Last edited by GS LEAD 5 at May 5, 2011,
#16
That maybe the case, but the fact that it hurts is completely irrelevant, that's not why you improve.

That's kind of like saying the cat bit you when you were filling out your winning lottery ticket, therefore you won because the cat bit you.

Certainly your right in saying that you should take breaks, and if it does start to hurt you should definiteley take one. However practicng the guitar isn't supposed to hurt, and pain is in no way an indicator of the effectiveness of your practice.
Actually called Mark!

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#17
Quote by steven seagull
That maybe the case, but the fact that it hurts is completely irrelevant, that's not why you improve.

That's kind of like saying the cat bit you when you were filling out your winning lottery ticket, therefore you won because the cat bit you.

Certainly your right in saying that you should take breaks, and if it does start to hurt you should definiteley take one. However practicng the guitar isn't supposed to hurt, and pain is in no way an indicator of the effectiveness of your practice.


Im talking specifically about building speed. I mean, when you start slow and keep going faster, higher speeds do make your hands feel kinda sore right? I'm talking about the point where you need to use all your concentration to play it right.
#18
A lot of these guys mentioned good stuff, so look at that.

But also, it could be simple stuff like not warming up at all. You've been playing long enough to know that you can't just jump into fast solos and shredding just from picking up the guitar at the beginning of the day.

Also, because I play in my basement, my hands get pretty cold, which restricts movement to an extent, so playing in a warmer environment where your fingers will move easier and won't tense up from the cold also helps.
#19
I've read somewhere that starting out at insanse speeds and then working your way slower can also help?
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