#1
Hello everyone.
Just a quick summary of my guitar playing before i get this thread started.
I've been playing guitar for just 2 years now (primarily electric, but i can play both to a good standard). I'm a lead player but i feel both my rhythm and lead playing are very strong.
My main weakness with my playing is a large lack of theory.
The purpose behind this thread was that i'm learning the new song Not Ready To Die by Avenged Sevenfold, and because it's new there are no tabs, but i just love the song, it's got some really heavy riffs and eery soloing which i love.
I thought now would be a good time to work on my ear training. I'm already good at training by ear, however, my main problem is, when learning by ear, is it a good idea to identify which scales things are played in etc?
As i said i don't know too much about theory, only the very basics, but i want to get better at my ear training.
With all songs (this song in particular) is there generally a scale or key the guitarists follow? If so, could anyone give me some sort of direction in which way to go about it?
I hope this makes sense. The link to the song is below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xBo5zvhdeM0

Thanks a lot. (:
#2
Bumping for great justice.
Answers would be appreciated if possible. :\
#3
how many songs have you learned by ear prior to this one? if this is one of your first, I'd suggest learning easier songs first, green day the offspring bush and the ramones are great for ear training ....

also while ear training you should be listening for the differences between intervals, the scale wont always hold the notes you need. can you hear the difference between a perfect fifth and a perfect fourth? how about major and minor thirds? major and minor seconds? diminished fifth/ augmented fourth? major and minor sixth? how bout the octave the amjor and minor seventh?

if you can tell these, you can tell how far apart the notes are so you should be able to figure out most of the notes by figuring out one note.... get some software to slow down the song without altering the pitch and you'll be fine....
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#4
Quote by krypticguitar87
how many songs have you learned by ear prior to this one? if this is one of your first, I'd suggest learning easier songs first, green day the offspring bush and the ramones are great for ear training ....

also while ear training you should be listening for the differences between intervals, the scale wont always hold the notes you need. can you hear the difference between a perfect fifth and a perfect fourth? how about major and minor thirds? major and minor seconds? diminished fifth/ augmented fourth? major and minor sixth? how bout the octave the amjor and minor seventh?.


I have learnt a few songs by ear before.
Last night i spent a good 2hours or so trying to learn this song. I managed to figure out all the rhythm guitar and the leads before the solo.
I used windows media player to slow the song down to even a quarter of the tempo, but for the life of me i still couldn't figure out the solo.

Also, i indeed cannot hear the difference between a perfect fifth and fourth etc. I don't even know what they are to be honest. As i stated above theory is my weakness.
#5
Quote by vayne92
I have learnt a few songs by ear before.
Last night i spent a good 2hours or so trying to learn this song. I managed to figure out all the rhythm guitar and the leads before the solo.
I used windows media player to slow the song down to even a quarter of the tempo, but for the life of me i still couldn't figure out the solo.

Also, i indeed cannot hear the difference between a perfect fifth and fourth etc. I don't even know what they are to be honest. As i stated above theory is my weakness.

Yes you do and yes you can!

Do you know the melody to the Star Wars theme?

Do you know the melody to the Wedding March?

assuming you do then you DO know what a perfect 5th and a perfect 4th are and can tell the difference between them, as I''m assuming you can differentiate between the two tunes.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#6
Well i don't know either of those melodies on guitar.

I don't know major and minor thirds as stated above either, or major and minor seconds and so forth.
#7
There's reams of information on the net for music theory, also here on this site.

What seagull is getting at is you do know these intervals, but you don't know how to identify them yet, and a small bit of homework will help you out here.
#8
Quote by vayne92
Well i don't know either of those melodies on guitar.

I don't know major and minor thirds as stated above either, or major and minor seconds and so forth.

Whether or not you can play them on the guitar is irrelevant - do you know them?

Likewise a major third - do you know what the first two notes of the bass line in Sweet Child of Mine sound like? Again forget about your guitar, do you simply know what those notes sound like. And even if you don't know it, if you listen to the song can you hear those two notes and could you hear them back in your head or sing them without having the song playing?

Minor second - have you seen Jaws?
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#10
Go here!!!

Read from Part 1 through to Part 11 and don't get overwhelmed.

If you don't understand something, read it again and again until it makes sense, it will.
#11
Quote by steven seagull
Whether or not you can play them on the guitar is irrelevant - do you know them?

Likewise a major third - do you know what the first two notes of the bass line in Sweet Child of Mine sound like? Again forget about your guitar, do you simply know what those notes sound like. And even if you don't know it, if you listen to the song can you hear those two notes and could you hear them back in your head or sing them without having the song playing?

Minor second - have you seen Jaws?


A bit of same problem over here, I can hear them back or sing without the song being played! But why can't I just find them on guitar
ACE AND THE ASS
#12
Quote by ady.gravity
A bit of same problem over here, I can hear them back or sing without the song being played! But why can't I just find them on guitar

you really don't need to... eventually you will her these songs every time you hear the interval... so like with the minor second, you will hear it in a song and the jaws theme will ring in your head.... you'll know it.

try this:

any string will work, however it sounds best on the lower strings and you can change the frets as well as long as they are only one fret apart....

|-5---6---5--6--5-6-5-6|



this probably isn't exactly the jaws theme by note but the intervals are the same. change where you play it on the fret board and you will still hear it, only play the first two notes, your mind will begin to fill in the rest on it's own.... now do this with other songs you know. you can find different intervals at the beginng of all kinds of songs.



A|-3--0----3--3--0-|
E|-------3---------|

this is the first measure of Down on the Corner by CCR, the first two notes are going down a minor third. now you have a song to associate that movement to, now go and find others. I've found that finding your own songs to associate with each movement makes it much easier to memorize. my hint for that is to find songs that start with single notes and figure out the interval, and weather they move up or down... good luck!
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.