#1
Hey guys

I have recently been put in charge of helping to write and perform some music for a friends University project, a film based on a woman living in a prison/confinment.

I am doing it mostly on guitar (both electric and acoustic), I need help finding some dark, atmospheric chords, all I have at the minute is an Em(add9), this chord has that deep sound I'm looking for, I am using that and a mixture of tapped harmonics over the top of the chord and it sounds pretty cool.

I'm just wondering if you can help me find some similar sounding chords to include.

I have only just started getting into theory so try to dumb things down a little

Cheers
#3
All I can think of is to use a few other add9 chords in the key of E minor, like Am9 and Dm9.
#5
Quote by Capt_Clarkson
Hey guys

I have recently been put in charge of helping to write and perform some music for a friends University project, a film based on a woman living in a prison/confinment.

I am doing it mostly on guitar (both electric and acoustic), I need help finding some dark, atmospheric chords, all I have at the minute is an Em(add9), this chord has that deep sound I'm looking for, I am using that and a mixture of tapped harmonics over the top of the chord and it sounds pretty cool.

I'm just wondering if you can help me find some similar sounding chords to include.

I have only just started getting into theory so try to dumb things down a little

Cheers


Do we get credit in the film?
shred is gaudy music
#6
explore some open chords...triads with different notes in the bass like F/G F/A C/Bb and then move them around to discover more flavors...

..and sus 4 chords .. the add 9 chord you are using are also call sus 2 chords by some...different inversions of chords also bring new flavors and ideas

play well

wolf
#7
Quote by wolflen
the add 9 chord you are using are also call sus 2 chords by some


Cadd9- C E G D
Csus2- C D G
#8
I found a really nice borrow chord in context with a non borrowed one.
I think I heard it a few times in a movie.
It's the V and de VII chord.
If you look at the notes in example G is your V which gives G B D and the VII gives B D# F#.
Notice how you have one note that's the same notes and the rest are half steps.
You could typically find this at the moment when someone walks through a forest and then the forest stops and the camera moves from his face en quarte to what he sees which is mostly a beatifull place.
These 2 chords keep changing to each others and while the person is seeing the place and is flabergasted it will sustain one of the 2, and also with a choir sining aahs through the whole ting.
Wow I give pretty accurate descriptions...
#9
creatively voiced add-9 chords a sweet. the b7 gets rid of the "atmospheric" effect ur looking for, so don't include it. try to incorporate open strings and put some of the notes in the chord on a weird octave compared to the others. rhythm and timbre are also a huge part of atmosphere, try an acoustic-electric guitar drenched in effects like chorus, and a lead electric guitar pourin out pink floyd-ish bluesy stuff. the rhythm should also be slow, when its too fast it loses the atmosphere. hope this was the kinda sound u were lookin for!
#10
Quote by d1sturbed4eva
Cadd9- C E G D
Csus2- C D G



thus...by some...didn't say it was correct..though this could be an endless loop of "what is the name of this chord...really?"
#11
context context context. that's it. there is no single chord that sounds atmospheric per se, it's all in context. anyone who thinks there is only fools themselves.

if you play an Esus4 chord out of nowhere, no precedent, no subsequent, then that is your context, and the sound you get depends on the orchestration and the voicing.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.