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#1
then what the hell are supernovas?
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#4
Quote by LordBishek
That's not space, is it now?


wat
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I had a dream about your avatar once, so yes of course.

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#5
If things cant explode in space how did big bang hppen? scientists 0 createionists 1
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#7
Quote by blake1221
Things can explode, just not the firey shit like the Death Star.


stars seem pretty fiery, if you ask me
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I had a dream about your avatar once, so yes of course.

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every time i see that twirling electrode avatar of yours I know that the post is worth reading or the link is worth clicking


#8
Who ever said things can't explode in space? Sure they can, just can't burn.
#9
Quote by fearofthemark
stars seem pretty fiery, if you ask me


I'm talking about the mechanized looking fire shit, which I assumed was what you were talking about.
#11
Quote by robhc
Who ever said things can't explode in space? Sure they can, just can't burn.


Ding ding ding!
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#12
Quote by fearofthemark
wat


An exploding star is not space. It's IN space. It carries all the necessary materials required for a supernova to occur within itself.

Essentially, a star has gravity, pulling it inwards, making it contract. At the same time, products undergoing nuclear fusion within the star are radiating energy, which creates backpressure which counteracts the tremendous gravitational forces of the star from causing self-collapse.
If the star is massive enough, it slowly contracts, and beyond a certain point, the increase in temperature caused by this contraction results in a runaway nuclear reaction, releasing an incredible amount of energy in an extremely short space of time. This energy is enough to overcome gravity and the star explodes outward, releasing both the energy and the thermonuclear byproducts plus assorted debris.

Actually, there are a couple of different types of Supernova, but that's a layman's explanation.

And explosions=/=combustion. Explosions are just a very quick release of energy.
#13
Quote by blake1221
I'm talking about the mechanized looking fire shit, which I assumed was what you were talking about.


oh

Quote by robhc
Who ever said things can't explode in space? Sure they can, just can't burn.


but the sun burns..


rahh confusing.
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I had a dream about your avatar once, so yes of course.

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every time i see that twirling electrode avatar of yours I know that the post is worth reading or the link is worth clicking


#15
Quote by LordBishek
An exploding star is not space. It's IN space. It carries all the necessary materials required for a supernova to occur within itself.

Essentially, a star has gravity, pulling it inwards, making it contract. At the same time, products undergoing nuclear fusion within the star are radiating energy, which creates backpressure which counteracts the tremendous gravitational forces of the star from causing self-collapse.
If the star is massive enough, it slowly contracts, and beyond a certain point, the increase in temperature caused by this contraction results in a runaway nuclear reaction, releasing an incredible amount of energy in an extremely short space of time. This energy is enough to overcome gravity and the star explodes outward, releasing both the energy and the thermonuclear byproducts plus assorted debris.

Actually, there are a couple of different types of Supernova, but that's a layman's explanation.


ahhhh

that makes so much sense!

Thanks!
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I had a dream about your avatar once, so yes of course.

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#16
Quote by guitarxo
Supernovas are like supermarkets, except they're novas.


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#17
Quote by fearofthemark

but the sun burns..
rahh confusing.

The Sun doesn't really 'burn'. People say it does, because that's a really simple way of saying it. The Sun is just constantly undergoing nuclear fusion, through a similar process that Bishek explained.
#18
Quote by fearofthemark
oh


but the sun burns..


rahh confusing.


No it doesn't. Stars are essentially nuclear reactions, they do not burn.
#19
Quote by ZanasCross
It's because of communist Russia. They launched a nuke a while back and it's ****ing with space-time.


Is that a...

Are you...

Is there a Tensor in your user title?


Quote by fearofthemark
ahhhh

that makes so much sense!

Thanks!


You're welcome
Last edited by LordBishek at May 4, 2011,
#20
Quote by LordBishek
An exploding star is not space. It's IN space. It carries all the necessary materials required for a supernova to occur within itself.

Essentially, a star has gravity, pulling it inwards, making it contract. At the same time, products undergoing nuclear fusion within the star are radiating energy, which creates backpressure which counteracts the tremendous gravitational forces of the star from causing self-collapse.
If the star is massive enough, it slowly contracts, and beyond a certain point, the increase in temperature caused by this contraction results in a runaway nuclear reaction, releasing an incredible amount of energy in an extremely short space of time. This energy is enough to overcome gravity and the star explodes outward, releasing both the energy and the thermonuclear byproducts plus assorted debris.

Actually, there are a couple of different types of Supernova, but that's a layman's explanation.

And explosions=/=combustion. Explosions are just a very quick release of energy.

Your statement was the single most valuable post I've ever seen in the Pit, and I even learned something from it. High five.
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#21
Quote by robhc
Who ever said things can't explode in space? Sure they can, just can't burn.

What about magnesium?
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#22
Quote by guitarxo
Supernovas are like supermarkets, except they're novas.

You should give lectures
#23
Quote by strat0blaster
Your statement was the single most valuable post I've ever seen in the Pit, and I even learned something from it. High five.




Thanks

But mind you, it's so simplified that it's probably wrong. No doubt a physicist will be in here to correct me sooner or later.
#24
Quote by fearofthemark
but the sun burns..


rahh confusing.


The Sun doesn't "burn" in the sense that it has a nice wooden center.
It "burns" in the sense of you are witnessing the immense energy created by nuclear fusion. It's not just a big ball of fire in the sky.
#25
Quote by LordBishek

But mind you, it's so simplified that it's probably wrong. No doubt a physicist will be in here to correct me sooner or later.

It's actually pretty good. I can't find anything terribly wrong in it.
Then again, I never really studied astronomy or nuclear physics all that much. But from what I know, it seemed pretty solid. Just short, and waaay simplified.
#26
Don't any of you know how to wiki?!

"A supernova is a stellar explosion that is more energetic than a nova."


There, that settles it.
#27
Quote by robhc
Who ever said things can't explode in space? Sure they can, just can't burn.


no, they actually can burn to but not with the help of oxygen, since there is no such thing in space naturally. And stars and whatnot burn because they are made of gas.

/thread
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#28
Quote by backtothe70s
no, they actually can burn to but not with the help of oxygen, since there is no such thing in space naturally. And stars and whatnot burn because they are made of gas.

/thread


But oxygen combustion forms a small proportion of the energy released in a star. What now?
#29
Quote by backtothe70s
no, they actually can burn to but not with the help of oxygen, since there is no such thing in space naturally. And stars and whatnot burn because they are made of gas.

/thread


No, burning requires oxygen to occur. With out it, nothing can burn (of course, they are exceptions to this, but I cba explaining them, and they still can't burn in space, so it's irrelevant any ways). Stars don't burn, they undergo nuclear fusion of hydrogen to helium. That is not burning.
#30
Quote by backtothe70s
no, they actually can burn to but not with the help of oxygen, since there is no such thing in space naturally. And stars and whatnot burn because they are made of gas.

/thread


They burn because of the ****tons of energy being released. Stars are so massive that their own gravity creates such a dense core the molecules inside undergo nuclear fission. So atomic explosions occur. That giant release of energy
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Last edited by Wesseem at May 4, 2011,
#32
All this information all over the net and you ask what a supernova is on UG? Since thats so difficult for you let me help.

A supernova is a stellar explosion that is more energetic than a nova. It is pronounced /ˌsuːpəˈnəʊvə/ with the plural supernovae /ˌsuːpəˈnəʊviː/ or supernovas. Supernovae are extremely luminous and cause a burst of radiation that often briefly outshines an entire galaxy, before fading from view over several weeks or months. During this short interval a supernova can radiate as much energy as the Sun is expected to emit over its entire life span.[1] The explosion expels much or all of a star's material[2] at a velocity of up to 30,000 km/s (10% of the speed of light), driving a shock wave[3] into the surrounding interstellar medium. This shock wave sweeps up an expanding shell of gas and dust called a supernova remnant.

And yes im being a smart ass.
#33
Quote by backtothe70s
no, they actually can burn to but not with the help of oxygen, since there is no such thing in space naturally. And stars and whatnot burn because they are made of gas.

/thread


If there's no such thing as oxygen in space, then where is the earth?


*trollface.jpg*
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I had a dream about your avatar once, so yes of course.

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every time i see that twirling electrode avatar of yours I know that the post is worth reading or the link is worth clicking


#34
Quote by strat0blaster
Your statement was the single most valuable post I've ever seen in the Pit, and I even learned something from it. High five.


quoted for truth
What?! There's a clean channel on my amp?!

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#35
It's science.

No one knows how science works.

Just accept it.

To change the topic slightly, I love it how in firefly there's never any sound in the space scenes. It's the only sci-fi show or movie I've ever seen that actually takes note of the fact the sound cannot travel through the vacuum of space.
#36
Quote by Guano23
All this information all over the net and you ask what a supernova is on UG? Since thats so difficult for you let me help.

A supernova is a stellar explosion that is more energetic than a nova. It is pronounced /ˌsuːpəˈnəʊvə/ with the plural supernovae /ˌsuːpəˈnəʊviː/ or supernovas. Supernovae are extremely luminous and cause a burst of radiation that often briefly outshines an entire galaxy, before fading from view over several weeks or months. During this short interval a supernova can radiate as much energy as the Sun is expected to emit over its entire life span.[1] The explosion expels much or all of a star's material[2] at a velocity of up to 30,000 km/s (10% of the speed of light), driving a shock wave[3] into the surrounding interstellar medium. This shock wave sweeps up an expanding shell of gas and dust called a supernova remnant.

And yes im being a smart ass.

Stop using words!
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#37
Quote by Kensai
If things cant explode in space how did big bang hppen? scientists 0 createionists 1


You can't explain that.
#38
Quote by backtothe70s
no, they actually can burn to but not with the help of oxygen, since there is no such thing in space naturally. And stars and whatnot burn because they are made of gas.

/thread


Depends on your definition of burn. If burning means involving combustion, then you're wrong, there is no oxygen in space, therefore nothing can combust.

Burning's definition: 'Combustion or burning is the sequence of exothermic chemical reactions between a fuel and an oxidant accompanied by the production of heat and conversion of chemical species'

Therefore the thread is not closed.

However I don't know what you're definition of burning is...
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#39
Quote by fearofthemark
oh


but the sun burns..


rahh confusing.


The sun doesn't burn, its nuclear energy, not fire. If you thought the sun was fire that would imply a giant millenia lasting fuel like wood to be in there.
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#40
Quote by LordBishek
An exploding star is not space. It's IN space. It carries all the necessary materials required for a supernova to occur within itself.

Essentially, a star has gravity, pulling it inwards, making it contract. At the same time, products undergoing nuclear fusion within the star are radiating energy, which creates backpressure which counteracts the tremendous gravitational forces of the star from causing self-collapse.
If the star is massive enough, it slowly contracts, and beyond a certain point, the increase in temperature caused by this contraction results in a runaway nuclear reaction, releasing an incredible amount of energy in an extremely short space of time. This energy is enough to overcome gravity and the star explodes outward, releasing both the energy and the thermonuclear byproducts plus assorted debris.

Actually, there are a couple of different types of Supernova, but that's a layman's explanation.

And explosions=/=combustion. Explosions are just a very quick release of energy.


A supernova (type 2) is what happens when a very heavy (ie of high mass) star comes to the end of it's life. There are also gamma ray bursts, but that's not relevant.
A supernova occurs when said star begins to create iron through nuclear fusion. As iron is the most stable element, having the highest binding energy, it takes tremendous energy to fuse anything higher than it in the periodic table, actually taking energy rather emitting it. This is why iron is a death sentence for stars - fusion shuts down because nothing else can be burnt and the iron just saps the remaining energy.
As a the outward pressure of a star is in a "war" with the gravitational weight, when that outward pressure stops the core collapses from a size of about 5,000 miles to about 12 in less than a second. As the core does not collapse to an equilibrium point, though, it rebounds and imparts a tremendous amount of energy on the collapsing outer shells in massive shockwaves. This energy throws the shell surrounding the shell out at speeds of 10 million mph and restarting, briefly, nuclear fusion which creates elements above that of iron. Then what you're left with is a black hole or neutron star and rapidly expanding shells of star debris along with a whole load of other radiation.

EDIT:
Quote by Baby Joel
The Sun doesn't really 'burn'. People say it does, because that's a really simple way of saying it. The Sun is just constantly undergoing nuclear fusion, through a similar process that Bishek explained.


Google: Burn definiton

---> 9. Use (a type of fuel) as a source of heat or energy

So a star does burn, just not using the same force.
Last edited by br33dlove at May 4, 2011,
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