#1
What counts as a finished fretboard? I've tried googling it but found nothing helpful. My guitar is a Fender Strat with a rosewood fingerboard. I'm about to do a string change and I want to use this 'Gibson Luthiers Choice Fretboard Conditioner' I have while I have the strings off. Also, what else should I do while the strings are off. Oh i've never changed the Fender strings before and its my first guitar with a tremolo so anything I should be aware of?

Thanks,

Rich.
'Slap bass refers to the slap delivered to the bassist when they play too loud or with any kind of attention drawing behaviour...'

'The dusty end, is not my friend.'
#2
a finished fretboard is generally one that has been clear coated (typically done to maple fingerboards). Yours, unless it is a very strange example of a fender, wont have a finished fretboard. You can use pretty much and fingerboard conditioner, though lemon oil is a cheap and effective option (the gibson stuff should be fine).

other than that, its pretty much smooth sailing. Unless you have a locking trem, you shouldn't have to do anything special to change the strings. if you really want, you could pick up a fret polishing kit, but that would hardly be necessary unless the frets have gotten really grimy
#3
Quote by krehzeekid
a finished fretboard is generally one that has been clear coated (typically done to maple fingerboards). Yours, unless it is a very strange example of a fender, wont have a finished fretboard. You can use pretty much and fingerboard conditioner, though lemon oil is a cheap and effective option (the gibson stuff should be fine).

other than that, its pretty much smooth sailing. Unless you have a locking trem, you shouldn't have to do anything special to change the strings. if you really want, you could pick up a fret polishing kit, but that would hardly be necessary unless the frets have gotten really grimy

I've only had the guitar for... let me see... 46 days now. But as you can imagine i've been pretty much playing the nut off it for at least 30 days! thanks for the info. I'll do the fretboard for sure and use some normal metal polish for the frets while i'm at it. Basic stuff I know but i'm relatively new to this stuff and really don't want to hurt my Deloris!
'Slap bass refers to the slap delivered to the bassist when they play too loud or with any kind of attention drawing behaviour...'

'The dusty end, is not my friend.'
#4
If the guitar has only had a month or so of use then don't put any conditioner on the board of any kind. Rosewood only needs conditioning and oiling like, once every couple of years, once it has really dried out. Yes you CAN over-condition and over-oil rosewood and that CAN cause significant damage.

You also don't want to be using random polish on the frets either. To polish up frets you use a special kind of tiny metal polishing cloth which is kind of like an ultra-fine sandpaper, even finer than wet&dry sand paper. You use that without chemicals. The onyl chemicals that should go anywhere near your fretboard are specific fretboard condtioners, lemon oil, synthetic lemon oil or teak oil and even those should only be used sparsely and on very, very rare occasions.
#5
Quote by grohl1987
If the guitar has only had a month or so of use then don't put any conditioner on the board of any kind. Rosewood only needs conditioning and oiling like, once every couple of years, once it has really dried out. Yes you CAN over-condition and over-oil rosewood and that CAN cause significant damage.

You also don't want to be using random polish on the frets either. To polish up frets you use a special kind of tiny metal polishing cloth which is kind of like an ultra-fine sandpaper, even finer than wet&dry sand paper. You use that without chemicals. The onyl chemicals that should go anywhere near your fretboard are specific fretboard condtioners, lemon oil, synthetic lemon oil or teak oil and even those should only be used sparsely and on very, very rare occasions.



I have the same gibson stuff the TS is talking about and I have to condition my fretboard more often than that for sure. I have a rosewood fingerboard on my RG2550 and it dries out mad quick. On the other hand, I used to have a Schecter Hellraiser FR with a rosewood board and very rarely dried out. I think it might depend on the guitar.
Last edited by Necronomicon at May 4, 2011,