#1
I'm trying to get a decent classical piano sound out of my digital piano (Yamaha CP50). I want to get a relatively "close" sound with nice mids, but I fall short of getting there.

This is the best I've managed so far: soundcloud using some EQing, stereo enhancement and reverb.

Not the best example, but this is more like the sound I'm trying to get:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-4quKyrOVww


Any tips on how to get closer to that kind of piano sound digitally?
#2
Are you miking the instrument or using a DI? Normally, when we record an electronic keyboard, we DI it. Having an impedance mismatch will effect the tone. Get the impedance issue resolved, then work out the rest from there.
#3
Quote by KG6_Steven
Are you miking the instrument or using a DI? Normally, when we record an electronic keyboard, we DI it. Having an impedance mismatch will effect the tone. Get the impedance issue resolved, then work out the rest from there.


Sorry, I'm not the most tech-savvy, and the language barrier isn't helping either. I assume DI means something along the lines of recording the line out-signal?

Anyhow, I'm recording/saving the audio data directly to a USB-device without any in-betweens (feature of the cp50), so there shouldn't be any possibility of an impedance mismatch or anything like that.
#4
You could've fooled me. Your English is just fine.

DI means Direct Input or Direct Inject. In it's simplest form, it's nothing more than a small box with an input and an output. In between the two jacks, it uses an audio transformer to change the impedance. In it's more complex form, it can support different types of connectors (XLR, TRS 1/4" and RCA) and use active circuitry.

However, since you're using a USB device, none of that is applicable. I've never recorded from a USB device, however my guess would be that it all comes down to EQ of the audio signal. You may not be able to get it exact, but you should be able to get it close.
#5
Everyday English isn't much of a problem, of course, but factual terms are a bit of a pain at times. Somewhat amusingly though, what you describe is, in Swedish, known by the utterly Anglicised "line box".

I guess I'll just have to fiddle around with the EQ more. Hoping someone with a better ear for frequencies might stop by, though, I'm kinda stumbling in the dark.
#6
But are you using midi out from your keyboard going to a USB input on the computer?

Or are you running an instrument cable from the audio out of the keyboard into an interface of some sort, and then from there going USB into the computer?

This is a significant variable.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Quote by axemanchris
But are you using midi out from your keyboard going to a USB input on the computer?

Or are you running an instrument cable from the audio out of the keyboard into an interface of some sort, and then from there going USB into the computer?

This is a significant variable.

CT


Actually, none. Audio data (.wav) saved directly via USB port ("to device", not a MIDI-out or anything) using the piano's interface onto a flash drive.


EDIT: I said saved but seeing as the audio data is generated in real-time I guess recorded is a better word. But anyway, it goes straight from the tone generator to the flash drive.
Last edited by descara at May 6, 2011,
#8
A lot of your piano sound is going to come from how you process it in the end. Also, it has a lot to do with the room. Most of the time for stuff like you posted, its recorded in a giant ass hall using multiple mics or theres lots of post processing. Probably your best bet is going to be using a virtual piano in a DAW and recording from there.
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