#1
So I've been looking into recording my own stuff lately and I'm really interested in how this would work.

So say I buy or download recording software on my computer.
Would I be able to just run my amp through the recording or is there anything else I would need?
#2
Depending on your hardware and software set up it varies. Personally I mic up my amp with a usb microphone (which is kind of a cheap solution for me tbh) and record using adobe audition. It can be a bit tricky setting up latency and getting the right drivers (asio4all is quite useful). It comes down to what mic you have and what ports you've got. If you got a good soundcard some of them come with proper inputts to plug your amp into but I have seen mates frying their sound card plugging straight in.
One of my friends uses a mixer that goes into his pc and I think most the stuff is mic'd up. Im not an expert but Im sure someone here will provide further information!
#3
Would the micing be the same idea with the guitars? I would like to get the tone I from my amp and not the one I get through my headphones.
#4
It kinda depends. What are your goals/expectations for your recordings?
-just to play back and listen for performance quality?
-to sell to people, as in doing a CD and selling it, say, on iTunes?
-you want it to sound like Mutt Lange?

Different expectations have different demand and different price points.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#5
Possibly selling it to people and possibly just to get better at mixing my own stuff.
#6
Offering stuff for sale really raises the bar on expectations. If you bought a CD from someone and brought it home and it sounded like a hacker's basement demo, would you be pissed off? I would. This starts getting expensive.

Recording just for kicks and for evaluating your playing/writing/whatever comes in at a really low-budget point.

What's your budget? If you want to sell stuff, you really can't go there for less than a couple of grand anyways. (assuming live drums and what-not...)

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Well, I have all of the instruments necessary, I just need a way to record them all and mix them.
#8
Quote by Wraithbound
Well, I have all of the instruments necessary, I just need a way to record them all and mix them.


Does that include drums?

Do you want to record digital or analog?
#9
I'm talking about just recording gear.

A decent interface that will produce "release quality" results, and have 8 inputs so you can do live drums will cost you about $700 or more.

A decent pair of monitors will cost you about $700 or more.

A decent kick mic will cost $200 or more.

A decent vocal mic will cost $300 or more.

A decent snare mic will cost $100 or more.

There's your two grand. And you still have to buy:
-drum overheads
-mics for toms
-cables and stands for mics (THOSE add up!)
-software
-headphones for monitoring
-maybe a DI box or two
-whatever adapters and such you might find you'll need
-maybe a firewire card if necessary
-maybe a pop filter
-maybe some room treatments

...

Two grand for release quality is really on the light end. Some people pay two grand just for a vocal mic, or just for a channel strip, or just for software.

This is why I suggested that there is a huge difference between "just making stuff for kicks" quality and "I'm going to ask people to buy this" quality.

Never mind the time it will take to get good at recording. How long did it take for you to be good enough at guitar to produce results that people would buy? Five years maybe? Ten? Think of recording as a new instrument. You sure as heck don't buy a guitar when you've never played before and expect to produce release quality results in six months. Recording is the same way.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#10
Quote by axemanchris
I'm talking about just recording gear.

A decent interface that will produce "release quality" results, and have 8 inputs so you can do live drums will cost you about $700 or more.

A decent pair of monitors will cost you about $700 or more.

A decent kick mic will cost $200 or more.

A decent vocal mic will cost $300 or more.

A decent snare mic will cost $100 or more.

There's your two grand. And you still have to buy:
-drum overheads
-mics for toms
-cables and stands for mics (THOSE add up!)
-software
-headphones for monitoring
-maybe a DI box or two
-whatever adapters and such you might find you'll need
-maybe a firewire card if necessary
-maybe a pop filter
-maybe some room treatments

...

Two grand for release quality is really on the light end. Some people pay two grand just for a vocal mic, or just for a channel strip, or just for software.

This is why I suggested that there is a huge difference between "just making stuff for kicks" quality and "I'm going to ask people to buy this" quality.

Never mind the time it will take to get good at recording. How long did it take for you to be good enough at guitar to produce results that people would buy? Five years maybe? Ten? Think of recording as a new instrument. You sure as heck don't buy a guitar when you've never played before and expect to produce release quality results in six months. Recording is the same way.

CT


Jeeeeeze, buddy. Have you ever heard of a BUDGET? You can do far more for way less than that.

The quality of your sound will come in your approach to recording, not your gear. You'll still have to drop some dough, but you can definitely save some cash here and there.

The most important thing and the first on your list should be an interface, for sure. Depending on if you're doing drums or not, 8 inputs may or may not be necessary. Firewire will be important if you want to record more than 2 tracks at once, however.

You really have to tell us more about what you're trying to record though.
#11
That *is* on a budget!! Sure, you can go out and buy the cheapest gear you can find, but I'm pricing out gear that you're actually going to want to use that will get you your "release quality" with a reasonable effort.

To further that... okay, scrimp here and there on my equipment cost list. Maybe save $400. Okay. Now go buy even half of this list....

-drum overheads
-mics for toms
-cables and stands for mics (THOSE add up!)
-software
-headphones for monitoring
-maybe a DI box or two
-whatever adapters and such you might find you'll need
-maybe a firewire card if necessary
-maybe a pop filter
-maybe some room treatments

... and you're back up well over $2000 again.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
Quote by axemanchris
That *is* on a budget!! Sure, you can go out and buy the cheapest gear you can find, but I'm pricing out gear that you're actually going to want to use that will get you your "release quality" with a reasonable effort.

To further that... okay, scrimp here and there on my equipment cost list. Maybe save $400. Okay. Now go buy even half of this list....

-drum overheads
-mics for toms
-cables and stands for mics (THOSE add up!)
-software
-headphones for monitoring
-maybe a DI box or two
-whatever adapters and such you might find you'll need
-maybe a firewire card if necessary
-maybe a pop filter
-maybe some room treatments

... and you're back up well over $2000 again.

CT


Yeah, eff it, you're right haha. I just added up the price of everything I use to record in my own studio and it definitely exceeds $2,000. Luckily we won some of the gear (5 SM58s from a battle of the bands) so that really saved us some dough.

Like I said, you're just gonna have to tell us more about what you have in mind. I did my first band's release going direct with everything and using drum software, but we shelled out everything to be able to have real drums on our next release.
#13
I would like to start working on developping good solo albums. Preferrably with guitar, vocals, drums and bass. Possibly adding synth here and there. Mulitple tracks would be great. Mixing for pan and volume contral as well. Would love to be able to record at home and would love it if it didnt cost 4 grand to get it.