#1
How do u determan this? How do the pros do it


Also when is it sound good to put arpeggios in soloing? Say em csn i throw a em arpegg? Or a em7#9. Can i play a em arpegg on that or woild it have to be a em7#9 arpeggio?
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#2
Umm... You pick a key? You pick a progression?

YOU can use arpeggios whenever YOU want.
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Quote by liampje
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#3
Well you just write the song, and it turns out to be in a progression and key.

Seriously you're thinking about music theory all wrong. It doesn't tell you how to write, it' examines what's already written.

As for arpeggios, all they are are chords played one note at a time. You can play an Em arpeggio over an Em chord. You can add extensions in the arpeggio. You can play a C major arpeggio over it if you wish. If it sounds good to you, just do it.
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#4
heres the only thing that really matters, wait for it.....


does it sound good?

if yes, then it's right don't worry about the theory.

if no, then it's wrong, and if you choose you can use your theory knowledge to fix it.

thats the key to song writing period, and this is the closest you will ever get to a real formula....
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#5
I just want to throw it out there that an Em#9 arpeggio is kind of redundant, since the minor third and augmented second are enharmonic notes and wouldn't appear in a consistent, single key.
#6
When it comes down to it, it's all just notes. Feel free to play the notes E G B over a chord with the notes E G B. In fact, this will work really nicely because each note you play in your melody is just a note in the chord.

Also, listen to Alan, he's on the right track.

Quote by juckfush
I just want to throw it out there that an Em#9 arpeggio is kind of redundant, since the minor third and augmented second are enharmonic notes and wouldn't appear in a consistent, single key.
Ha! I didn't even notice this! I guess my eyes saw it and my brain just assumed E7#9 or Em7b9.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
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#7
You just pick a key, some have favourite keys.
Mine are I think B major and E major.
But for the progression try to find what sound you want.
Start experimenting with chords you've never tried, play chords with non diatonic notes such as Eminadd9 in C major, learn new things, learn theory like I should, but my theory book won't come untill 4 days grrr.
#8
D minor is the saddest of all keys, I find. I don't know why, but it makes people weep instantly whenever they hear it.

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#9
Quote by liampje
You just pick a key, some have favourite keys.
Mine are I think B major and E major.
But for the progression try to find what sound you want.
Start experimenting with chords you've never tried, play chords with non diatonic notes such as Eminadd9 in C major, learn new things, learn theory like I should, but my theory book won't come untill 4 days grrr.

To elaborate on the Emadd9 suggestion, it could also be beneficial to understand the relationship of the borrowed note with respect to your original home key, as you'll be able to better apply the same and similar tactics and ideas when writing in the future.
The borrowed F# would likely stem from G major (if it is the only non-diatonic note being used), a close neighbouring key, and depending on context the new Emadd9 could function as a vi of V movement to set up a temporary key change, or even as a catalyst to change the key completely within the piece of music.

Using inversions can also subtly alter the implied function of chords, as both the bass note and melody note are altered, thereby altering the movement and relative movements of each voice part. not to mention that the mid-range of each chord would suggest some more suitable harmonies in the progression, while still retaining the same notes of your original chord.
(As an experiment, try to find the root position, 1st inversions, 2nd inversion and 3rd inversions voicings of a major seventh chord on one set of strings, such as the 6th, 4th, 3rd and 2nd. Consider how the whole perceived sound of the chord changes with the new intervallic structure - it's also a good idea to notate these - and repeat the approach for different chord types and string sets. You can even base an entire section of a composition on one chord and its inversions, since the bass and melody lines are not static).
Last edited by juckfush at May 7, 2011,
#10
Quote by AlanHB
Seriously you're thinking about music theory all wrong. It doesn't tell you how to write, it' examines what's already written.

This is getting sigged because it's so true.
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#11
Quote by brandon2784
This is getting sigged because it's so true.

Music theory was ''invented'' to do that but later on it was used as easy writing, experimenting became thinking.
It gives structure on how to write things but not completely, if you want something dissonant sounding I would say pick a minor chord and amke it add9 the add9 crushes with the minor third since major second and minor third is half a step away.
#12
Quote by liampje
Music theory was ''invented'' to do that but later on it was used as easy writing, experimenting became thinking.
.



^ trust this guy. He has an extensive knowledge of music history and theory.
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#13
Quote by GuitarMunky
^ trust this guy. He has an extensive knowledge of music history and theory.



Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything.

—Chick Corea
#14
Quote by GuitarMunky
^ trust this guy. He has an extensive knowledge of music history and theory.

I see what you did there o_O
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#15
Originally Posted by AlanHB
Seriously you're thinking about music theory all wrong. It doesn't tell you how to write, it' examines what's already written.




This is getting sigged because it's so true.


Everything said above is correct, just remember to keep in mind the range of your singer's voice when composing.
#17
Actually, i am so bad at theory that it hurts, but my idea would be that the notes in a specific scales, would be the same notes to build chords around.

if you play a minor scale in E, the notes in that scale, would be the same notes to have as base for any chord.. riiiight? and then of course, theres countless variations you can do at each chord, so thats quite an arsenal right there.


Then again, IT MIGHT JUST BE VOODOO.. but thats what i do, and it usually works.. ****ING BEES


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Herp.. Jokes aside. Just read up on it really. There is a bunch of lessons on this site, and what they don't tell you, fiddling around and common sense will. Also theres some good stuff on youtube. personally i enjoy that guitargnogstic guy. I think thats the name. He's kind of.. funny. And good at what he does.
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Last edited by Northernmight at May 10, 2011,