#1
So im just learning Psychosocial by Slipknot and i cant play the pinch harmonic at the beginning. Ive heard all you have to do is pick and then hit it with your thumb, but that's not working. Does anyone have any tips or vids that show how to do it well?

Thanks
GLEN JENSEN. That is all.....


Proud owner of an Ibanez Wh10V2
#2
You have to hit the string in the right place as well. At some points on the string it is physically impossible to get an audible pinch harmonic. So try hitting the string at different locations.

As for technique, the pinch harmonic is executed by striking the string with the pick, and in the same motion, lightly dampening the string with the side of your thumb. Holding the pick closer to the point will help you with this when you're starting out.

Gear-wise, things that will help the harmonics really ring out are lots of gain and a bridge humbucker. You can get pinch harmonics on the neck pickup without distortion as well, they just won't bring teh br00tz.
Last edited by NakedInTheRain at May 5, 2011,
#3
Not enough detail in that post but,

Use high gain.
You should actually lightly touch the string with your thumb after picking.
The position in which you perform the harmonic may not be "the spot". You see, not every part of the string can give you a harmonic.
Mute all strings that you are not playing, if you let other strings ring out then you will not get a harmonic.
Last edited by Kortez3000 at May 5, 2011,
#4
ive got the gain and the neck humbucker, ill go try what you said for a minute.
GLEN JENSEN. That is all.....


Proud owner of an Ibanez Wh10V2
#5
bridge humbucker dude. if you have a single coil bridge, and a neck humbucker, the single coil bridge will still help them ring out more. it's more of the positioning of the pickup rather than the output or type of that pickup.
#6
wow I'm a dimwit.... i meant bridge. It sounded like a got a few, but i can't get them consistently. You can bend and do them, right?
GLEN JENSEN. That is all.....


Proud owner of an Ibanez Wh10V2
#9
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5I5O8P-r5Rk

I used that video... I basically had to figure out the best way to do it myself, though. Videos can guide you but you have to get the technique down by practicing and finding the movement that you need to play them consistently.

This is another video I remember watching: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-0TK6rBGVg
#10
The only way is practice, lots of it and every guitar is a bit different so you have to probe out where you can beast achieve them. It took me a LOOOOOOOONG time to even hit my first pinch harmonic then I sat there for about a half hour trying to hit them getting steadily more consistent.

My advice, once you get the approximate idea for the technique of it work your picking up and down the strings between the neck and bridge to try and find the sweetspots for hitting pinch harmonics. Do it a bunch of times so you start to get a bit of muscle memory for where to hit them. Lots of gain (not over-saturated though) and some delay/reverb help bring them out. High output pickups (personally I've got an EMG-81TW in my LP Jr) tend to bring them out as well.

If you're not already familiar with natural harmonics you should work on those first as the technique is related.
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#11
Lots of gain, lots of treble (as increasing this, increases harmonic content), bridge pickups.

It helps if you use Jazz 3 picks as they are smaller and it enables you to use your thumb to flick off the string.

By the way, i'm sure you've done pinch harmonics before, just by accident.
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#12
I have found that guitars / amp settings make a huge difference for pinch harmonics.

For example, my VOX VT30 seems to pick up pinch harmonics way more than my Peavey 6505 or Krank amps. There's definitely a difference for every guitar too.

I know people will say "well you can do pinch harmonics on an acoustic", I know. I'm sure with perfect technique I could do pinch harmonics on any guitar/amp but I have to consciously not try to accidentally pinch harmonic on my Vox VT30.
#13
Quote by farmosh203
I have found that guitars / amp settings make a huge difference for pinch harmonics.

For example, my VOX VT30 seems to pick up pinch harmonics way more than my Peavey 6505 or Krank amps. There's definitely a difference for every guitar too.

I know people will say "well you can do pinch harmonics on an acoustic", I know. I'm sure with perfect technique I could do pinch harmonics on any guitar/amp but I have to consciously not try to accidentally pinch harmonic on my Vox VT30.



Sounds like you might be a bit mental.

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#14
I can play pinch harmonics deliberately, but more often than not I find myself playing rhythm parts to metal songs with half the notes being pinched without me meaning to do it :S
#15
Quote by farmosh203
I have found that guitars / amp settings make a huge difference for pinch harmonics.

For example, my VOX VT30 seems to pick up pinch harmonics way more than my Peavey 6505 or Krank amps. There's definitely a difference for every guitar too.

I know people will say "well you can do pinch harmonics on an acoustic", I know. I'm sure with perfect technique I could do pinch harmonics on any guitar/amp but I have to consciously not try to accidentally pinch harmonic on my Vox VT30.


Something's wrong there, I can get pinches on my friend's 6505 just as easily as all three of my amps and both of the shitty distortion pedals I own.

No there isn't. Where harmonics occur on a string is a mathematically predictable element that doesn't vary between guitars at all, if you can get a pinch in one place on one guitar then you'll be able to to the same pinch in the same place on another guitar with the same scale length.

If, as you say, you have to try not to get pinches at any point I would suggest really looking at the way you play because that shouldn't be happening, no matter what amp you're using.
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Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at May 6, 2011,
#16
I just started practicing teh squeels myself, and I find that to get clear harmonics, I have just the very tip of the pick sticking out between my fingers, and I tilt it slightly backwards. And rather than touching the string with my thumb right after picking it, it feels more like Im touching with my thumb at the same time. Dunno if Im doing in completely wrong, but thats how I get mah squeels. Man I love the sound, I wanna do them all the time.
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#17
I find that picks make a huge difference in the ease of creating pinch harmonics, some picks are simply easier to do it with than others for your technique/finger size. I'd suggest you try your different picks and see which ones you can do it best with, because when learning, there's no need to make it harder than it really is.
#18
No there isn't. Where harmonics occur on a string is a mathematically predictable element that doesn't vary between guitars at all, if you can get a pinch in one place on one guitar then you'll be able to to the same pinch in the same place on another guitar with the same scale length.


You're saying the frequency response of all pickups are the same huh? That's just high school Physics, I assumed the harmonics were attempted in the same place each time.
Last edited by farmosh203 at May 6, 2011,
#19
It says it in the justintv video (or whatever that site is called) but right away, try practicing your pinches on the 7th fret of the G string. Apparently its really harmonic or something (blah blah blah) its easy to get it on that note (D).
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#22
Wow. I feel great after watching you play teh Gates. Lolz sorry.
Bad ass guitar man. Go get some lessons.


Eh, I figure you learn better if you learn by yourself.
#23
Haha, maybe. For me I learnt by myself for 3.5 years.
Like 3 months of lessons and I easily learnt that 3 years worth.
A teacher really forces you to work on your weak areas, which they will identify for you.
Listening to yourself can be deceiving.
#24
I'd rather learn slowly, otherwise I'd be a bored guitar master with nothing to do.
#25
Well, personally I think that statement is insane.
Guitar is something you cannot finish learning. You learn till you die or stop.
May as well get a step up.
#26
Ill jump on off topic wagon here.
I believe learning by yourself can assure that you are always motivated when you learn, because you only play when you want to play. If you take lessons, maybe sometimes you dont really wanna go play guitar at the time and you'll just wanna get it over with and therefor not get a lot out of your lessons. This is the reason I teach myself with a little help from the internetz.
But I do agree that Farmosh' last statement is completely insane. Sorry mate :P
Ibanez RG1570Z w/ BKP Holy Divers
Focusrite Scarlett 2i4 /w Guitar Rig 5
Stupid clumsy fingers
#27
Quote by Bastyn99
Ill jump on off topic wagon here.
I believe learning by yourself can assure that you are always motivated when you learn, because you only play when you want to play. If you take lessons, maybe sometimes you dont really wanna go play guitar at the time and you'll just wanna get it over with and therefor not get a lot out of your lessons. This is the reason I teach myself with a little help from the internetz.
But I do agree that Farmosh' last statement is completely insane. Sorry mate :P



Good call, my guitar lesson was on wednesday and I didnt wanna go. So I didnt. But it cost me 25$. I ended up playing anyways.
#28
It's the journey, not the final destination that makes something fun. Took me a long time to realize that.
#29
On the first page there was talk about where you hit the string (sweet spots). Did they mean that on certain strings it is hard to hit an AH so you should try to hit that note (same or octave above or below) on a different string? Or did they mean that where you strike the string with your picking hand makes a difference, regardless of what fret you are on.

I have never experimented with that aspect of playing AH by trying to strike the string at different lengths of the string. For example, closer to the bridge or neck pickup. Trying to strike the string on top of the fretboard etc.
MARTY FRIEDMAN--"It’s a lot easier to be technical than it is stylized; it really is... But I think it’s a lot more rare to have someone who’s really got their own sound because that’s something you can’t practice."
#30
Took me 2 years to figure out how to do these.. so dont get frustrated if you dont get them the first time.

The nodes are never the same for every guitar, so thats why its recommended you take the time to find them along the strings over your pickups. on my Ibanez, the nodes are near the front of the bridge pickup, on my LTD theyre closer to the bridge.
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Last edited by Mitochondria9 at May 7, 2011,
#31
First off, what you need to know, and I'm sure people will battle me for this, but that's not a pinch harmonic. That's an artificial harmonic.

An Artificial Harmonic is when you kind of twist the pick and swipe the string with your thumb. Most people refer to this as a Pinch Harmonic.

A Pinch Harmonic is when you hold a chord with your fretting hand and put the index finger of your picking hand on the fretboard very lightly, as if to do a natural harmonic, and pluck with your thumb, to get a harmonic.


Copied and pasted from a thread last week.
Quote by silhouettica
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#32
Angus Jr. I believe you are thinking of Harp Harmonics.
MARTY FRIEDMAN--"It’s a lot easier to be technical than it is stylized; it really is... But I think it’s a lot more rare to have someone who’s really got their own sound because that’s something you can’t practice."
#33
Quote by Angus_Junior35
First off, what you need to know, and I'm sure people will battle me for this, but that's not a pinch harmonic. That's an artificial harmonic.

An Artificial Harmonic is when you kind of twist the pick and swipe the string with your thumb. Most people refer to this as a Pinch Harmonic.

A Pinch Harmonic is when you hold a chord with your fretting hand and put the index finger of your picking hand on the fretboard very lightly, as if to do a natural harmonic, and pluck with your thumb, to get a harmonic.


Copied and pasted from a thread last week.


I think that's completely reversed... But I am a self taught idiot. To the guy comparing 6505 to VT30 for pinch harmonics, I'm thinking perhaps it could just be the EQ because you do need to play with it a bit to bring out the right harmonics and it will be different for every amp/guitar combo.
My Gear:
Suzuki Classical Guitar from 60s
B.C. Rich Warlock
Epiphone Les Paul Junior
Monterey Steel String Acoustic
Maton M255 Steel String Acoustic
Agile AL-3100 w/ EMG 81/85
Bugera 6262-212
#34
Dunlop Jazz 3s make it easy to do PHs, and all you really need to do is pick and let your thumb scrape the string as you pick. I kind of attack the tring from the top when I do it, and you need to find the sweet spot; mine's usually near the middle pickup, but it changes on each string. It's much easier with plenty of gain.
#35
Quote by farmosh203
It's the journey, not the final destination that makes something fun. Took me a long time to realize that.


In case of learning to play the guitar, what do you consider the final destination?

I think that's sort of a meaningless concept for any musical intrument (except maybe the triangle).
#36
There is no ''final destination'' for any musical instrument, Period.

Edit: In terms of Chops, etc.