#1
Ok, I'll clear this up straight off - I'm not just a noob who's not used to playing in a band setting. I've played jazz, blues, swing, rock, funk, etc. in a band setting. Just not metal.

My friends and I are in a metal band. I get great sounding ideas in my head, and I can get the guitar parts out of my head sometimes. Whenever I can actually do that, they sound good, just like in my head.
Then the problem comes up.
Whenever my drummer plays with it, it begins to sound like crap. NOT saying he's a bad drummer. Sometimes he even plays the exact beat I had in my head. But it NEVER sounds right. It always sounds like something's missing or just isn't right.

Anyone have any ideas as to why?
Sorry this is such a dumb question. It's just really getting to me as a musician.
#2
Improvising can be hard. Try getting a few songs down on guitar alone, then have the drums come in when you think you got it.
#4
I tried both of those. I know we're in time. and he usually plays after I've got the riff down. But it still sounds just kinda hollow and empty and gross.

How important are these factors to making it actually sound good? :

- Bass being heard
- Drums being properly tuned
- Drum heads

If the exact guitar part and drum beat are being played, could those above factors actually make it still sound bad and not like the music it should sound like?

I stopped by someone's house to pick up an amp, and they were having practice, and everything actually sounded tight with the drums, etc. for them
#5
Quote by swarley
Sounds obvious but make sure you guys are playing in time.

Definitely this too. You and your drummer may have practiced with a metronome and all but both need to know the rhythm and the tempo of the song.
#6
Quote by Kortez3000
Definitely this too. You and your drummer may have practiced with a metronome and all but both need to know the rhythm and the tempo of the song.


We do.
It sounds in time and whatnot, it just doesn't have that feeling to it that metal (if you like it) gives you. That feeling that makes you want to move.

Not just because the song sucks. It sounds great in my head but the quality of the sound is just bad when we actually play it.

Refer above ^^
#7
Quote by epiphoneLP777

How important are these factors to making it actually sound good? :

- Bass being heard
- Drums being properly tuned
- Drum heads


- Bass being heard

very important, there is a world of difference between the quality of your sound when the bass is not loud enough... honestly 90% of the songs you probably enjoy would sound so empty and boring with out the bass...

- Drums being properly tuned

nothing is worse for rhythm than a loose drum head, especially on the snare, you don't want that ringing too long, it sounds like crap and it makes the beats (and atleast to me any rolling) sound off

- Drum heads

drum heads really aren't much different than strings... it's all the drummers preference, like its yours for strings... but new drum heads will sound amazing if the ones being used are eral old and worn out....
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#8
these are all fairly important...

- Bass being heard
a general guide for practice purposes, have your drummer play a groove at his regular volume, and make the bassist's volume the same as his snare, it won't get in the way of the guitars, but is still loud enough to be heard.
that's how i set my volume when practicing or preforming with my band, and it works great.

- Drums being properly tuned
Very important, tell your drummer to tune next practice.

- Drum heads
New drum heads are nice to have, but if your drummer is good at tuning you may not need this (unless you've broken one.... in which case you should replace it) ;P
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#10
That's a good idea...also I think things sound a lot different when you are actually playing them, you could try recording yourselves on a camera with a mic or something?
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#11
I think I know what the problem is here.
You have the sound of 4 full stacks in your head but your fighting with the drummer with a 1x12 combo.
#12
I think i know what you mean. I had the same problem when i played in a metalband some years ago.

What i tried, and what everyone should try when they write songs is to try the songs in diffrent tempos. Try the song really slow once, still sounds crap? Try it really fast once, still sounds crap? then try the midtempo. Im sure that many songs you've writen sound really good slowed down, half tempo, or really the other way around, try speeding up some songs.

This will open up a whole new world of inspiration for you. When i write songs and mess around with the tempo, my brain comes up with different ideas for the song depending on what tempo i use. The fast version might not sound the same as the slow one.

Try this aswell, Write a song really flat. Have like intro-vers-chorus-introriff-vers-prechorus-chorus-solo part and soo on. Then when your done it's easier to, on the paper, point out whatb should be in there and what shouldnt.


Cheers!