#1
Key of D


fcgdaeb

3sharps
daebf#c#g#


D - E - A - D - B - F# <--- progression
e - F# - B - E - C# - G#| <- What I thought were the rest of the chords
F# - G#- C# - F# - D - A | <-

what did i do wrong?
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Last edited by Sheepbane at May 6, 2011,
#3
wow im tarded, I started counting from the f. . .
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#5
DAEBF#C#G

D | E | A | D | B | F#| <--- progression/Root
E | F#| B | E | C#| G|
F#| G | C#| F#| D | A |


Are my chords right now for this progression and key?
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Last edited by Sheepbane at May 6, 2011,
#6
Quote by Zen Skin
I'm not sure I understand your question.

In the key of D Major there are 2 sharps, F# and C#.

To harmonize the D major scale in traids use:

DMaj Emin F#min GMaj AMaj Bmin C#dim


Isn`t C#dim a diminished 7th chord?
As in C# - E - G - Bb,

So shouldn`t it be Cm(b5)?
#8
ok this is confusing now. .
How do I know what notes to use in chords based on the key im playing in and the root note.
What I was trying to ask is if my chords were right:
DEF#
EFG
ABC#
DEF#
BC#D
F#GA
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#9
No...
A major triad is composed of Root (R) 3rd 5th and a minor triad is R b3rd and 5th. The diminshed which is the 7th chord is R b3rd b5th. So for D the three notes would be

I D-F#-A DMaj
II E-G-B Emin

Try to do the rest
#10
Quote by Sheepbane
ok this is confusing now. .
How do I know what notes to use in chords based on the key im playing in and the root note.
What I was trying to ask is if my chords were right:
DEF#
EFG
ABC#
DEF#
BC#D
F#GA


Those are the notes of D major, though the chord construction is a little different.

First, learn chromatic scale, basically a scale compromising of every possible note:

A
A# / Bb
B
C
C# / Db
D
D# / Eb
E
F
F# / Gb
G
G# / Ab
A

and then it repeats


Then the interval names.

Unison
Minor 2nd
Major 2nd
Minor 3rd
Major 3rd
Perfect 4th
Diminished 5th
Perfect 5th
Minor 6th
Major 6th
Minor 7th
Major 7th
Octave

and the "half step" and "step"

half step = a note 1/2 step, or 1 fret, higher than the preceding note.
step = a note 1 step, or 2 frets, higher than the preceding note.

e.g. Looking at the chromatic scale again

A
A# / Bb
B
C
C# / Db

- A to A# is a half step, A to B is a step. B to C is a half step, B to C# is a step. In fretboard terms it would be like this:

E|
B|
G| (Half step)----(Step)
D| A - A#/Bb---- A - B
A| 0 - 1---------- 0 - 2
E|


Now, take the notes of the scale:

D E F# G A B C#

Now number them:

D E F# G A B C#
1 2- 3- 4- 5- 6- 7

So now each note has a corresponding number you can start to see how chords are made.

Major chords contain the Unison, Major 3rd, and Perfect 5th.
Minor chords contain the Unison, Minor 3rd, and Perfect 5th

Formula
Major chord - 1, 3, 5
Minor chord - 1, *b3, 5

*b3 = a half step lower, or one fret lower, than a Major 3rd


The major scale consists of the following intervals.

Unison,
Major 2nd,
Major 3rd,
Perfect 4th,
Perfect 5th,
Major 6th,
Major 7th,
Octave (or Major 8th/Unison, whatever you want to call it)

Now look at the interval names again.

1 -Unison
-Minor 2nd
-Major 2nd
-Minor 3rd
3 -Major 3rd
-Perfect 4th
-Diminished 5th
5 -Perfect 5th
-Minor 6th
-Major 6th
-Minor 7th
-Major 7th
-Octave

In a D major chord, the notes are

D - Unison
F# - Major 3rd
A - Perfect 5th

As you can see in the intervals chart, all you do is pick a starting note, go up a half step until you reach the Major 3rd, take that note, keep going up half steps until you get to the perfect 5th, and you now have a major chord. This applies to all major chords.

Major

1 -Unison - D
-Minor 2nd - D#
-Major 2nd - E
-Minor 3rd - F
3 -Major 3rd - F#
-Perfect 4th - G
-Diminished 5th - G#
5 -Perfect 5th - A

D minor is the same apart from the b3 (minor 3rd)

minor

1 -Unison - D
-Minor 2nd - D#
-Major 2nd - E
b3 Minor 3rd - F
-Major 3rd - F#
-Perfect 4th - G
-Diminished 5th - G#
5 -Perfect 5th - A

DFA


Now you know how to make a major chord, you need to know the diatonic chords (chords within a chosen key).

Major key chords - Again, this is for every major key.

Major
minor
minor
Major
Major
minor
diminished


Apply these to the D major scale and you get

D Major
E minor
F# minor
G Major
A Major / A7th
B minor
C# diminished

A diminished chord is - 1, b3, b5 (Unison, minor 3rd, diminished 5th) so a D diminished chord will be:

1 -Unison - D
-Minor 2nd - D#
-Major 2nd - E
b3-Minor 3rd - F
-Major 3rd - F#
-Perfect 4th - G
b5-Diminished 5th - G#
-Perfect 5th - A

DFG#

Try harmonizing the scale again and post your answers.
Last edited by Calibos at May 6, 2011,
#11
Okay, so the first chord in the progression would be:
DF#A
But here is where I am having trouble, The next Chord would be an E, Would it be:
EGB or would it be, EG#B? (I got this by taking the key of E major's 1/3/5)
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#12
First read that dudes incredibly long post. Second learn theory haha.
But it would be EGB. You wouldn't compose a minor chord using the parallel major scale, but the only difference in a minor triad and major triad is in a minor there is a flatted 3rd. So if you have to go that way just move the 3rd down a half step :-).

I IV V are always major chords (unless you renumber your degrees when in a minor key)

II III VI are always minor (unless you renumber)

VIIº is always diminished (unless you renumber).

So the chords in D major are

I- D ii- E min iii- F# minor IV- G V- A vi- B minor vii- C# Dim.

Now using the formula try and figure out each triad. Hint no other note will be used besides the 7 listed above.
Last edited by BrokenSymphony at May 6, 2011,
#13
Df#a
Egb
F#ac#
Gbd
Ac#e
Bdf#
C#eg

?
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#14
Learn theory bro. This all relates back to the harmonized major scale. Read that really long post a few posts up. Summed it up pretty well
by the time you read this you will be wasting your time because it doesnt say anything
#15
Quote by Sheepbane
Df#a
Egb
F#ac#
Gbd
Ac#e
Bdf#
C#eg

?



Looks good, now go learn theory! It's very helpful
#16
Quote by MaXiMuse
Isn`t C#dim a diminished 7th chord?
As in C# - E - G - Bb,

So shouldn`t it be Cm(b5)?
C#dim: C# E G
C#dim7: C# E G Bb
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#17
I''m gonna do it simply, unlike you guys

We have D major here. The notes are:
D E F# G A B C#

To make the triad chords from this scale, you take
one note, skip the next, take this note, skip the next, then take that as well.

Example for D
D E F# G A B C#

The notes I have highlighted above in red are for the D major triad.

The chords in this scale:
D major - D F# A
E minor - E G B
F# minor - F# A C#
G major - G B D
A major - A C# E
B minor - B D F#
C# diminished - C# E F#
Woffelz

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#18
Quote by Zen Skin
It's either called half-diminished or minor 7 flat 5, as opposed to the diminished 7 that you typed out.

I always was taught that half-diminished refered to a diminished triad with a minor 7th (as opposed to a diminished 7th). For example, ii7 chords in minor keys.

I think its misleading to call a diminished triad a minor chord with a b5. The b5 is the diminished fifth that defines the chordal quality of the diminished chord. It would seem to me that the m3 and the dim5 are the two defining qualities of the diminished chord, more so then the 7th.
Last edited by nmitchell076 at May 7, 2011,
#19
Quote by Woffelz
I''m gonna do it simply, unlike you guys

We have D major here. The notes are:
D E F# G A B C#

To make the triad chords from this scale, you take
one note, skip the next, take this note, skip the next, then take that as well.

Example for D
D E F# G A B C#

The notes I have highlighted above in red are for the D major triad.

The chords in this scale:
D major - D F# A
E minor - E G B
F# minor - F# A C#
G major - G B D
A major - A C# E
B minor - B D F#
C# diminished - C# E F#


I dunno when I'm just jamming doing improve I don't go oh man let's see D E F# G A B C# then go man D F# A is a D chord, I know where they lie on the neck so when I am playing I target them as notes to end on yes, but I don't sit there and think of this note and then skip a note each time I play (this likely makes no sense). Your way works I just don't see it being very practical for jamming. The way I do it I know where the 3rd and flat 3rd are to any note as well as the 5ths. I also know the notes on the neck so I find it much easier. But to the TS if this way works best for you go for it man just keep on learning until you figure out what works best for you.
#20
Quote by BrokenSymphony
I dunno when I'm just jamming doing improve I don't go oh man let's see D E F# G A B C# then go man D F# A is a D chord, I know where they lie on the neck so when I am playing I target them as notes to end on yes, but I don't sit there and think of this note and then skip a note each time I play (this likely makes no sense). Your way works I just don't see it being very practical for jamming. The way I do it I know where the 3rd and flat 3rd are to any note as well as the 5ths. I also know the notes on the neck so I find it much easier. But to the TS if this way works best for you go for it man just keep on learning until you figure out what works best for you.


To apply this my method, you MUST have knowledge of the notes of the fretboard. From there, it is a scoop of ice cream.
Woffelz

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#21
Quote by Woffelz
To apply this my method, you MUST have knowledge of the notes of the fretboard. From there, it is a scoop of ice cream.


I agree your method is easy when you have the knowledge of the fret board but you also must have knowledge of keys and notes in the keys, or the steps between each note of the scale.

Nothing is easy when it comes to theory at first my method you would need to know chord formulas, where each interval lies in relation to the tonic and the fret board. So hopefully we have helped the TS in some way
#22
Quote by BrokenSymphony
I agree your method is easy when you have the knowledge of the fret board but you also must have knowledge of keys and notes in the keys, or the steps between each note of the scale.


a skilled musician is expected to know those things, so i don't see your point.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#23
Quote by AeolianWolf
a musician is expected to know those things, so i don't see your point.


Fixed.
Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything.

—Chick Corea
#24
Quote by AeolianWolf
a skilled musician is expected to know those things, so i don't see your point.


My point is the person asking the question didn't seem to know this and so that method would be pretty useless...
#25
Quote by BrokenSymphony
My point is the person asking the question didn't seem to know this and so that method would be pretty useless...


while you do see the situation accurately, what you're saying in effect is that instead of learning more and applying his new knowledge, he should reject new information and let his fingers dictate what he plays.

we are supposed to control the instrument, but these days, i find that the reverse is true more often than not.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#26
Quote by AeolianWolf
while you do see the situation accurately, what you're saying in effect is that instead of learning more and applying his new knowledge, he should reject new information and let his fingers dictate what he plays.

we are supposed to control the instrument, but these days, i find that the reverse is true more often than not.


That is what it seems I was saying so sorry for the fopa in my earlier post I did say learn theory. So I agree he needs to learn the notes and theory, so no he shouldn't reject information but I was just offering a solution for now until he learns the rest of the information required, but the more I thought of my way I realized it wasn't much easier without more information. I guess this comes with being familiar with the instrument.