#1
Hey all.
I think I analysed Steve Vai's Hand On Heart correctly now.
Well here it goes:
So the chord progression F# E E F# Bsus2 A E(A shape) F# and again.
So what happens here is he first plays F# E E F# to Bsus2 it resolves good, because the notes of F#maj are F# A# and C#, the notes of Bsus2 are B C# and F#.
The A# resolves to B and the C# and F# remain the same.
Then he actually fools us, he borrows an A chord of the B minor scale and the chord progression goes like Bsus2 A E F#, but the lead lines plays only notes that are in both keys.
Then a few moments before he changes back to F# he plays an A# showing us he was actually in B major all the time.
Please correct me if I'm wrong and thank you for reading.
#2
edit: ok a little less harsh.

you should probably stop with these analysis threads. even if you did understand what you're talking about, which I don't think you do, how are you benefiting yourself? choosing songs like this (well, apparently exclusively Steve Vai songs), which often don't follow conventional harmonic motion and then stumbling through these confusing 'explanations' doesn't benefit anyone, including yourself. what's one practical thing you've learned as pertains to playing over the song that you couldn't have figured out before you made this thread?

ease up on posting threads. I get that they closed your "personal question" thread, but I mean really, try and figure some stuff out yourself, particularly given your history of ignoring people who try and correct you.
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
Last edited by Instrumetal at May 6, 2011,
#3
Quote by Instrumetal
edit: ok a little less harsh.

you should probably stop with these analysis threads. even if you did understand what you're talking about, which I don't think you do, how are you benefiting yourself? choosing songs like this (well, apparently exclusively Steve Vai songs), which often don't follow conventional harmonic motion and then stumbling through these confusing 'explanations' doesn't benefit anyone, including yourself. what's one practical thing you've learned as pertains to playing over the song that you couldn't have figured out before you made this thread?

ease up on posting threads. I get that they closed your "personal question" thread, but I mean really, try and figure some stuff out yourself, particularly given your history of ignoring people who try and correct you.

Actually this made me aware of when borrowing one chord from the parallel minor key can actually fool the listener into a key change.
#4
Judging from those chords, I think it would be F# major, and the E would be borrowed then, instead of the A chord. I haven't listened to the song, so I can't be certain.

Also, F# doesn't resolve to Bsus2.
#5
I thought I explained this one to you a while back.

Keth has it right in case you forgot what I said.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#6
Quote by Keth
Judging from those chords, I think it would be F# major, and the E would be borrowed then, instead of the A chord. I haven't listened to the song, so I can't be certain.

Also, F# doesn't resolve to Bsus2.

The lead plays A# against the E chord which could not be found in the E major scale.
Against the A chord he only plays notes which are in both B and E major.
#7
Quote by liampje
The lead plays A# against the E chord which could not be found in the E major scale.
Against the A chord he only plays notes which are in both B and E major.
I don't understand what you're getting at. A# is just a tension/passing tone over an E major chord.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea