#1
Whenever I go to play a solo over a backing track, or over a rhythm guitar, I always stay in those pentatonic boxes. I know all 5 positions and try to move around with them, but it all sounds kind of the same...

When I hear Andy James solo for example, (search 'ANDY JAMES solo contest' on youtube), He is playing way different scales, and it all sounds different and awesome...

Could anyone offer some advice for me in the ways of scales and which ones to play?

Any help is appreciated!
#2
Mixolydian Mode. A lot of Classic Rock stuff was written in that scale. Try it sometime!
I can only listen to so many breakdowns and "spoken word" vocals before I wanna puke.

I find Jennette McCurdy attractive, but Elizabeth Gillies and Debby Ryan much more so.

That's enough, Djent people. We get it.
#3
Major and minor scales, that's really about it for rock. Modes don't really have anything to do with it.
Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything.

—Chick Corea
#4
Moved to MT - not really a technique issue

TS, a question - when you play do you actualyl have an idea of the sound you want, or do you think in terms of "where shall I put my fingers?" and hope that something good comes out?
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#5
When I play I somewhat have an idea of what kind of sound I want, but I don't know many scales besides the major scales and pentatonics to get that sound. I try to get the sound I want, but usually go back into the pentatonics because I am most comfortable with them I guess...
#6
Quote by metallica55564
Whenever I go to play a solo over a backing track, or over a rhythm guitar, I always stay in those pentatonic boxes. I know all 5 positions and try to move around with them, but it all sounds kind of the same...

When I hear Andy James solo for example, (search 'ANDY JAMES solo contest' on youtube), He is playing way different scales, and it all sounds different and awesome...

Could anyone offer some advice for me in the ways of scales and which ones to play?

Any help is appreciated!


At this point I would say your problem won't be solved by simply learning more scales, but rather by learning to play musically.

Try this....

learn a solo or melody. Learn the scale that it's derived from.
Practice both, make the connection. MEMORIZE!

Do alot of this!!! Build up a repertoire.


Running up and down scale patterns, no matter how many you know, will only prepare you to run up and down scale patterns. If you want to play music, you have to practice music.

If you study the music you learn, what will happen is that your knowledge will accumulate along with your skills.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at May 7, 2011,
#7
Quote by Guppy_Odyssey
Major and minor scales, that's really about it for rock. Modes don't really have anything to do with it.

if you say so.. then the messed up scale without modes will be a chromatic.. just you try and combine major and minor scales at once if you don`t believe me.. hahaha.. i think,, modes, arpeggio, and pentatonic are the things..
#8
you make no sense.

Arpeggio? Arpeggios are just the intervals of a chord played individually, intervals that are derived from the major scale.

Pentatonic scales? Alterations of the major and minor, in fact exactly the same scales just using less notes.

In the greater scheme of things modes are rarely used.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#9
For metal, try the:

Natural minor scale
Phrygian mode

Rock:
Natural minor scale
Minor pentatonic scale
Major scale
Woffelz

Twitter
Youtube
Tumblr

Ibanez RG2550Z/SRX430
Alesis Core 1
BIAS FX


I'm a student. I've got no time or space for an amp!
#10
Quote by metallica55564
When I play I somewhat have an idea of what kind of sound I want, but I don't know many scales besides the major scales and pentatonics to get that sound. I try to get the sound I want, but usually go back into the pentatonics because I am most comfortable with them I guess...



That sounds reasonable. It's a process. Mess with them more and more. It's not a bad idea to deconstruct what Andy does, and then determine how you can take those insights, and add them to your playing. Chances are there are nothing but Major/Minor, which a few accidentals now and then as passing notes to color the music a little.

You're probably where you need to be, and so now, just gradually branch out, learning songs that embody the direction you'd like to start playing in.

Best,

Sean
#11
Quote by metallica55564
Whenever I go to play a solo over a backing track, or over a rhythm guitar, I always stay in those pentatonic boxes. I know all 5 positions and try to move around with them, but it all sounds kind of the same...

When I hear Andy James solo for example, (search 'ANDY JAMES solo contest' on youtube), He is playing way different scales, and it all sounds different and awesome...

Could anyone offer some advice for me in the ways of scales and which ones to play?

Any help is appreciated!



He is using a few different things.
Fast runs -- some are hammer on/full off (people call this legato but that is an abuse of terminology).

Fast tremolo pocking -- like a mandolin player would do ... quick up and down motion

Tapping -- you can see this

pinch harmonics -- you can hear when he makes a note "scream"

Some sweeps -- basically arpeggios played "metal"

Those are the techniques and a LOT of that sound is technique.

If you were to slow it down you would here a lot of minor licks, a he does some diminished licks and some chromatic stuff where he plays a figure and moves down a semi-tone plays the figure again, moves down a semi-tone, etc.

It is not like the backing track is a harmonically complex behemoth ... a few power chords over E and B as far as I can hear. But what he does with that little bit of harmonic structure is take some liberty -- he plays fast, uses metal techniques and creates a solo.

Create a backing track for yourself, slower, and see what you can do -- don't worry about getting the technique perfect -- just create something that sounds musical to you and vary and keep going.

Eventually you will want to speed things up and start learning those tricks and techniques that are signature of metal -- it just takes some time .. there are a lot of kids posting vids back using allll the same bag of tricks -- but a lot are not musical at all -- they just string together tricks. Be wary of that trap.
#13
harmonic minor is nice for metal but i find it kind of hard to write meoldys with it but thats just me
#15
Well, 7th's were naturally raised in most modal chant except in the phyrgian mode. The main point of it is to create a pull to the tonic with a V-i cadence.

Melodic minor was mainly used when approaching the cadence.
#16
You can use any scale you can conceivably make music with in rock. Hell, Scott Henderson even makes the whole tone scale sound groovy. Though you usually find pentatonic/blues and major scales outside of jazz fusion. Within it though anything goes.
#17
Thank you everyone for your suggestions and tips, it really helped me out! I appreciate all of your advice; thanks again!