#1
Hey all.
So I've got a slow down tool Bestpractice.
But when I slow it below 60% I can't hear the notes because of some kind of delay effect in the signal.
And I need to get about 20% to hear it good.
Only the problem is that I hear every single sound 4 times.
#2
the amazing slower downer is pretty good. I use it for Jazz.
Guitars:
Gibson SG Standard with Bigsby
Gibson Custom ES-137
Gibson Custom 54' Les Paul VOS Goldtop
Gretsch G6129T Silver Jet
1968 Harmony Rocket H75


Amps:
Fender Hot Rod Deluxe (modded)
1970 Fender Twin Reverb (blackfaced)

#3
Are you sure the song itself doesn't have an effect and you don't realize it until you slow it down?
#4
Slow down programs are a useful tool but you can't expect them to slow down a song to 20% of the original speed and not distort the sound. If you have to slow down a passage that much to hear what's going on you don't need a better program, you need a better understanding of music theory.
#5
Quote by wraith313
Are you sure the song itself doesn't have an effect and you don't realize it until you slow it down?

No I tried like millions of songs.
It's actually more of a physics thing but it's realistic that if I slow it down it has a delay because sounds are waves if I play one note a long time, I'm creating waves, slowing those tones down will give gaps in one actual wave.
#6
Quote by BobDetroit
Slow down programs are a useful tool but you can't expect them to slow down a song to 20% of the original speed and not distort the sound. If you have to slow down a passage that much to hear what's going on you don't need a better program, you need a better understanding of music theory.

That's no music theory.
I try to hear and then play it, that's ear training.
#7
Quote by liampje
That's no music theory.
I try to hear and then play it, that's ear training.

Learning theory helps immensely with being able to identify pitches and chord progressions.

They don't have listening and notation portions on the AP Theory test for nothing.

Audacity can do it, but you can only slow down a song so much before the signal starts to get distorted and weird sounding.

It's kind of like enhancing a picture. You can mess with the lighting effects and stuff a bit, but you can't get what isn't already there.
#8
Quote by Pac_man0123
Learning theory helps immensely with being able to identify pitches and chord progressions.

They don't have listening and notation portions on the AP Theory test for nothing.

Audacity can do it, but you can only slow down a song so much before the signal starts to get distorted and weird sounding.

It's kind of like enhancing a picture. You can mess with the lighting effects and stuff a bit, but you can't get what isn't already there.

Could you please explain what notation portions are and what AP theory test is?
By the way the part I try to figure out is really fast tapping.
It floats so fast my ears can't hear a single note because they pass so quickly, but what I heard lately I think where the part I have problems with is sextuplets.
It's Hand On Heart by Steve Vai and I have already done I would love to by him but the freaking fast parts never succeeded.
#9
The AP tests are Advanced Placement tests that are offered in high school- you take a college-level class and then you take a college-level exam on it. You're graded on a scale of 1-5, 5 being the best. If you get a 4 or 5, the general number of colleges and universities will give you college credit for it. 3 is passing, but pretty much the only place that will give you credit for that is the Naval Academy.

The notation portion of the AP Theory test is where you have to listen to a short passage that may be played by any number of instruments. I watched my friend take a practice test and one passage was played by cello and the other was played by oboe. You have to write out what the instrument was playing to the best of your abilities. The AP class and test both have a lot of pitch, chord, and scale identification. It's basically a class that helps train your ears and expand your theory knowledge.

As for learning that part of the song, I'd suggest looking at a tab if there is one, then watching a good video where you can see how he's playing it. Listen to it a lot so you can play it back in your head from memory, and from there you should be able to start breaking it down into parts.
#10
Quote by Pac_man0123
The AP tests are Advanced Placement tests that are offered in high school- you take a college-level class and then you take a college-level exam on it. You're graded on a scale of 1-5, 5 being the best. If you get a 4 or 5, the general number of colleges and universities will give you college credit for it. 3 is passing, but pretty much the only place that will give you credit for that is the Naval Academy.

The notation portion of the AP Theory test is where you have to listen to a short passage that may be played by any number of instruments. I watched my friend take a practice test and one passage was played by cello and the other was played by oboe. You have to write out what the instrument was playing to the best of your abilities. The AP class and test both have a lot of pitch, chord, and scale identification. It's basically a class that helps train your ears and expand your theory knowledge.

As for learning that part of the song, I'd suggest looking at a tab if there is one, then watching a good video where you can see how he's playing it. Listen to it a lot so you can play it back in your head from memory, and from there you should be able to start breaking it down into parts.

I'll never play tabs.
I'll just have to listen to it over and over again.
#11
If your using or have Driod tablet or phone, I'm using Audio Speed Changer ASC app. It does an excellent job below 30%.... And it also has a select playback section...