#1
Hey UG people. I've played guitar till now and I'd like to start with drums.
The problem is, as you've probably imagined already: I do not own a drum kit and the possibility of me getting one is very low. What I do own is a Darbuka if it's of any help; Although I'll repeat, I'm interested in drums.

Anyways, my question is; is there any way I can start learning some basics, or coordination or rhythm and etcetera without a drumkit? How would you recommend me to progress from there?
#3
just tap away basic beats on your knees with your hands and the floor with your feet. Watch a beginners drum lesson video on youtube or something, and just recreate what they play.
Also, you can buy a practice pad and a pair of sticks and just learn a couple rudiments
Neo Evil11
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#4
Well my brother's friend who played for a year just gave me a hand on facebook. He's basically taught me back in black's intro with a metronome.
Thanks guys. Could you link to any of the videos you'd use/ have used?
#5
Play on whatever instrument that is as a surrogate for an actual kit, and then just tap on the floor with your feet. Might sound crazy, but it works, srsly. I do lots of practice with coordination when I don't have a kit readily available (or even sticks) just by tapping my hands and feet on things. Although, I would recommend having sticks of course

What I mean by making that darbuka into a kit is like... in the basic rock beat, the right hand is playing 8th notes on the hi-hat, the snare is on 2 and 4, etc. So play that, only on the darbuka instead. Although, anything else that you can hit will work too, but might not be as pleasing to the ear, heh.
#6
Quote by Steve08
Play on whatever instrument that is as a surrogate for an actual kit, and then just tap on the floor with your feet. Might sound crazy, but it works, srsly. I do lots of practice with coordination when I don't have a kit readily available (or even sticks) just by tapping my hands and feet on things. Although, I would recommend having sticks of course

What I mean by making that darbuka into a kit is like... in the basic rock beat, the right hand is playing 8th notes on the hi-hat, the snare is on 2 and 4, etc. So play that, only on the darbuka instead. Although, anything else that you can hit will work too, but might not be as pleasing to the ear, heh.

Well so far I've been doing on a 100 - 120 BPM
8 strokes per 4 beats with my right hand.
right foot on 1 and 3.
Left hand on 2 and 3. Not sure what's supposed to be hitting what on the kit.
I'll try with the darbuka lol I've been using my knees so far.
#7
Yeah, that's the basis of the rock beat, and is really all you should be practicing at first other than working on just your hands. So, good on ya.

Doesn't really matter what you play it on, the left hand with that groove will in almost all circumstances be the snare, and the right foot be the bass drum, and the right hand be on the cymbals-- hi-hat or ride cymbal most commonly, sometimes a floor tom or something though.
#8
Quote by Steve08
Yeah, that's the basis of the rock beat, and is really all you should be practicing at first other than working on just your hands. So, good on ya.

Doesn't really matter what you play it on, the left hand with that groove will in almost all circumstances be the snare, and the right foot be the bass drum, and the right hand be on the cymbals-- hi-hat or ride cymbal most commonly, sometimes a floor tom or something though.

I see I'll practice it for a while till I get it 100% .
My brother's friend kinda bailed on me XD, so, any tips for the next step?
#9
Just play that over and over, except maybe with 8th notes on the left hand instead if you want to go for open handed playing (which is how I personally play, also). Then, start adding extra notes on the right foot, in time with the ones on your right hand. Once that feels comfortable, add a fill that lasts for a beat or two once in a while.
#10
Quote by Steve08
Just play that over and over, except maybe with 8th notes on the left hand instead if you want to go for open handed playing (which is how I personally play, also). Then, start adding extra notes on the right foot, in time with the ones on your right hand. Once that feels comfortable, add a fill that lasts for a beat or two once in a while.

I'm not sure I understand what open handed and fill means?
#11
Open handed refers to using the left hand to play the hi-hat as opposed to the right. Basically it means that you don't cross your hands whilst playing, ever. In my opinion it's more comfortable, beneficial to your playing in the long run in that it strengthens your left hand and allows for ambidexterity, and I feel that you get a greater range of motion, also.

A fill is just a short passage of notes to make things more interesting, as opposed to playing one beat over and over. It can be anything from just 4 notes on the snare (which is the most basic fill ever IMO) to really crazy stuff that uses all of your limbs in various combinations.
Last edited by Steve08 at May 8, 2011,
#12
Quote by Steve08
Open handed refers to using the left hand to play the hi-hat as opposed to the right. Basically it means that you don't cross your hands whilst playing, ever. In my opinion it's more comfortable, beneficial to your playing in the long run in that it strengthens your left hand and allows for ambidexterity, and I feel that you get a greater range of motion, also.

A fill is just a short passage of notes to make things more interesting, as opposed to playing one beat over and over. It can be anything from just 4 notes on the snare (which is the most basic fill ever IMO) to really crazy stuff that uses all of your limbs in various combinations.

I see what you mean but I think I'd rather use my right for that. It's very hard for me to play open handed I tried it today.
#13
Quote by EriX29
I see what you mean but I think I'd rather use my right for that. It's very hard for me to play open handed I tried it today.


It's probably best to start off playing the cymbals with your right hand and the snare with your left when playing the beat. Open handed is good for a bit of fun but i don't think it's something you should start off on.
EH


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#14
Quote by eddiehimself
It's probably best to start off playing the cymbals with your right hand and the snare with your left when playing the beat. Open handed is good for a bit of fun but i don't think it's something you should start off on.

I see, thank you.
#15
I don't know drumming is not a science lol we just hit shit do whatever you want though. What can you do without owning a kit? I guess just play paradiddles and flams on a pillow or book.
#16
^As a matter of fact, pretty much every exercise in books like Syncopation, 4 Way Coordination, The New Breed, etc. can be done with nothing other than yourself and the book. Not very inspiring, certainly, but limb coordination/independence can be developed just as well that way as without a kit. A ton of my 'practice' is done in school or other places where I'm bored and tapping on stuff with my hands and feet and it has paid off immensely, although I certainly play my actual drums quite a bit in addition to that.
#17
Quote by Steve08
^As a matter of fact, pretty much every exercise in books like Syncopation, 4 Way Coordination, The New Breed, etc. can be done with nothing other than yourself and the book. Not very inspiring, certainly, but limb coordination/independence can be developed just as well that way as without a kit. A ton of my 'practice' is done in school or other places where I'm bored and tapping on stuff with my hands and feet and it has paid off immensely, although I certainly play my actual drums quite a bit in addition to that.

Which book would you recommend the most?
Also, would you mind passing me your facebook/MSN? You've been a great help I think it'd be cool to have you for any other quick questions.
#18
Sure, my MSN = ccaroskullboy AT hotmail DOT com
I'm on almost all the time so feel free to ask whatever, whenever

IMO you should start off with Stick Control for hand technique. Other than that, you should wait for a bit before getting anything else, just focus on getting your basic coordination together and try learning more grooves if possible. That part is a bit hard without an actual kit, but even so I'd recommend mostly just permutations of the basic rock beat mostly, but even so, it'll be really useful. Also, doing something as simple as tapping one hand and one foot together at the same time is good practice.