#1
Not sure if this is the right forum, so move it if it isn't =D

Example:

A band intends to record a cover of ohhh lets say, Harvest - Opeth, and wants to sell it with a special edition of their album. What are the rules and regulations for doing this? Would just credit have to be given? or would they need express permission from the band?
#2
contact the band/ label they are under and gain permission, if your just a small band they might not even ask you for a cut of what you make, even if they do its better than not getting permission and ending up getting raped for court fee's haha
#3
You do not need to contact the band to do a cover. Some people do out of respect for the artist, but it's not required by law.
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#4
Quote by Ulalume
You do not need to contact the band to do a cover. Some people do out of respect for the artist, but it's not required by law.


if they plan on selling it and making money they do
#6
Quote by Ulalume
You do not need to contact the band to do a cover. Some people do out of respect for the artist, but it's not required by law.


Hmm, I'll see you in court

Basically
1. If you record a cover and release for free - YOU HAVE to make sure you credit the band and song writers, nothing else

2. If you record a cover and make money - You have to contact management to negotiate your path on this

3. If you play a cover live - The venue would have already organized what happens yearly, and the band need not worry
Last edited by Martindecorum at May 8, 2011,
#8
Quote by Martindecorum


Basically
1. If you record a cover and release for free - YOU HAVE to make sure you credit the band and song writers, nothing else


FALSE!! Please see the copyright for dummies sticky that jof linked to just above.

CT
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