#1
This might be an obvious question, but that would just make it more of a reason for me to know the answer.

If i learn the major scale pattern, could i simply switch the key depending on the chord to change the mode?

For example, if i play a C major scale over a G major chord, i would be playing a G mixolydian?
If this is the case, would it be fine for me to jusxt learn the major scale patterns and practice those and then just play them when i want to play certain modes?
Thank you all
#2
it would be fine, as long as you know what notes are you playing(meaning intervals) so you know where to resolve/create tension
#4
Moved to MT as it's more appropriate

The key thing to keep in mind here is that simply changing chords does NOT equate to changing keys or changing the tonic. If that G Major chord is in the context of a C Major progression then all you're doing throughout that progression is using the C Major scale.
Actually called Mark!

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#5
Quote by macashmack
This might be an obvious question, but that would just make it more of a reason for me to know the answer.

If i learn the major scale pattern, could i simply switch the key depending on the chord to change the mode?

For example, if i play a C major scale over a G major chord, i would be playing a G mixolydian?
If this is the case, would it be fine for me to jusxt learn the major scale patterns and practice those and then just play them when i want to play certain modes?
Thank you all



No, it doesn't work that way.

On it's own, if you play G to G (no sharps or flats), you could say that it is the Mixolydian mode/scale. But once you introduce a context such as being in a Major key, you're bound to that context.

So, if you're in C major, and your chord progression goes C - F - G ..... Your solo will be in C major over all 3 chords. No F Lydian, No G Mixolydian


if you want to use G Mixolydian to solo over a progression, then the progression should have G as the tonal center. ( in the key sig of no sharps and flats)

or for F lydian, same key signature, but F has to be the tonal center.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at May 8, 2011,
#6
For example, if i play a C major scale over a G major chord, i would be playing a G mixolydian?


Playing from C to C over a G major chord would be a G Lydian mode, because C is the 4th note of the G scale.

EDIT:

That is you play C to C with an F#.
Last edited by mseychel at May 8, 2011,
#7
^ No... G Lydian has a C# in it.

G A B C# D E F#.

C - C with an F# is just playing a G major scale starting and ending on C. Unless you are confused in thinking that being C Lydian?

To get G Mixolydian you would have to play G A B C D E F G over a G7 chord. Or a G pedal.
Last edited by Zanon at May 8, 2011,
#8
Quote by Zanon
^ No... G Lydian has a C# in it.

G A B C# D E F#.

C - C with an F# is just playing a G major scale starting and ending on C. Unless you are confused in thinking that being C Lydian?

To get G Mixolydian you would have to play G A B C D E F G over a G7 chord. Or a G pedal.


Yeah, that's right. I'm dumb.
Quote by AllenHB
Seriously you're thinking about music theory all wrong. It doesn't tell you how to write, it' examines what's already written.
#9
All of you are wrong, except for Munky Steven and Zanon. It doesn't sound like you are foundationally prepared for modes, and if you think that you are, then learn all the basics of music theory and diatonic harmony first, because without understanding that, all modal explanations might go over your head. You might consider getting a private teacher for learning, if at all possible.

Best,

Sean
#10
Quote by Zanon
To get G Mixolydian you would have to play G A B C D E F G over a G7 chord.


if and only if that G7 is functioning as the tonic chord.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#11
Well it's not really fair to users when that music theory FAQ up the top directs you straight to modes
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#12
Quote by AlanHB
Well it's not really fair to users when that music theory FAQ up the top directs you straight to modes


it's okay. we're used to saying the same exact things to people every time someone walks by.

walmart should hire us. they'd make billions on the greetings alone.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#13
Quote by AeolianWolf
it's okay. we're used to saying the same exact things to people every time someone walks by.

walmart should hire us. they'd make billions on the greetings alone.


Hi there! We're MT! Wanna try something new? Instead of asking about scales and modes, why not ask about scales and keys?

We just would like to to have the most pleasant experience here in our little forum.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#14
Quote by AlanHB
Hi there! We're MT! Wanna try something new? Instead of asking about scales and modes, why not ask about scales and keys?

We just would like to to have the most pleasant experience here in our little forum.


Oh how I wish people would talk about chords more, chords chords chords. Far more interesting than scales
#15
Quote by Zanon
Oh how I wish people would talk about chords more, chords chords chords. Far more interesting than scales


o hai i accidentally 93 MB of aug6 chords is this healthy
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#16
Quote by AeolianWolf
o hai i accidentally 93 MB of aug6 chords is this healthy


It's obviously in E minor, n00b.
Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything.

—Chick Corea
#17
Quote by Zanon
Oh how I wish people would talk about chords more, chords chords chords. Far more interesting than scales


Now thats a fact.
#18
Quote by Zanon
Oh how I wish people would talk about chords more, chords chords chords. Far more interesting than scales


Yeah well in special UG land chords = noob, scales = intermediate and modes = advanced. Most users are trying to finish the game on hard because then you get the trophies for noob and intermediate difficulties upon completion anyway.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#19
Quote by AlanHB
Yeah well in special UG land chords = noob, scales = intermediate and modes = advanced. Most users are trying to finish the game on hard because then you get the trophies for noob and intermediate difficulties upon completion anyway.

Yup, that pretty much sums up how I imagine people approach it.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#21
Quote by AlanHB
Yeah well in special UG land chords = noob, scales = intermediate and modes = advanced. Most users are trying to finish the game on hard because then you get the trophies for noob and intermediate difficulties upon completion anyway.


This. Learning modes doesn't unlock all the secret characters either.
#22
Quote by Calibos
This. Learning modes doesn't unlock all the secret characters either.



Right. And another problem is that when many guitar players "learn modes", they aren't really learning them, they memorize shapes on a fretboard. Why does it seem that guitarists are so obsessed with modes, anyway? Is it simply because they skip foundational stuff and go to youtube videos for their instruction?
Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything.

—Chick Corea
#23
It's easy to fall for. I jumped straight into modes simply because of the vague descriptions of what they could sound like.

"Phrygian mode has a dark, spanish/middle eastern sound popular in metal"
"Locrian has a very dark, unstable sound popular in metal"


This to me meant "Learn modes : Sound professional". Why learn the boring old major scale when you can learn the brootal modes?

And yes, I also fell for the scale shapes trick, believing they were the be all end all of modes. The problem is a lot of the information is very misleading. Take this video for e.g.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C35US9Otsw0

It doesn't tell you anything about modes or how to use them or what they even are. He has 6 other videos covering all the other modes, and what do you actually learn from them other than modes are just specific scales?
Last edited by Calibos at May 11, 2011,
#24
Quote by AlanHB
Yeah well in special UG land chords = noob, scales = intermediate and modes = advanced. Most users are trying to finish the game on hard because then you get the trophies for noob and intermediate difficulties upon completion anyway.


Haha! That is probably the best thing I have read on here!
Quote by AlanHB
Yeah well in special UG land chords = noob, scales = intermediate and modes = advanced. Most users are trying to finish the game on hard because then you get the trophies for noob and intermediate difficulties upon completion anyway.
#25
Quote by Calibos
It's easy to fall for. I jumped straight into modes simply because of the vague descriptions of what they could sound like.

"Phrygian mode has a dark, spanish/middle eastern sound popular in metal"
"Locrian has a very dark, unstable sound popular in metal"


This to me meant "Learn modes : Sound professional". Why learn the boring old major scale when you can learn the brootal modes?

And yes, I also fell for the scale shapes trick, believing they were the be all end all of modes. The problem is a lot of the information is very misleading. Take this video for e.g.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C35US9Otsw0

It doesn't tell you anything about modes or how to use them or what they even are. He has 6 other videos covering all the other modes, and what do you actually learn from them other than modes are just specific scales?


Brilliant observations!

To me its all about magazine style marketing.

SUPERCHARGE YOUR PLAYING BUY MY MAGAZINE AND START PLAYING WILD EXOTIC CREEPY THANGS THAT MAKE GIRLS SCREAM, EYES BLEED AND SKIN MELT!

Sean
#26
Quote by Sean0913
Brilliant observations!

To me its all about magazine style marketing.


Sean


That's where I see it coming from. not just magazines .....DVD's.... instructions books.... musician institutes.....

Hey if it's coming from guys like Paul Gilbert or Joe Satriani then it's a must learn right?

Lets face it, while those guys did manage to reach the mainstream to a certain extent, their main demographic is us. If you're only selling so many albums, magazine articles and DVD's on whatever subject you can come up with is a good way to bring in some more $$$.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at May 11, 2011,
#27
Quote by macashmack
This might be an obvious question, but that would just make it more of a reason for me to know the answer.

If i learn the major scale pattern, could i simply switch the key depending on the chord to change the mode?

For example, if i play a C major scale over a G major chord, i would be playing a G mixolydian?
If this is the case, would it be fine for me to jusxt learn the major scale patterns and practice those and then just play them when i want to play certain modes?
Thank you all

well modal playing doesnt really have a key so no you cant just switch the key in order to change the major scale into another mode.

if you were to play the c major scale over a G major, you would be simply doing what you just described. you are right in the sense that the share the same notes, but they are treated differently. G mixolydian has a tonal center of G. for all purposes of technical practice, if you just played a C major scale up and down the neck over a static G, it will sound like you are practicing the mixolydian mode. however, in actual modal playing, the relationship between the melody and the tonal center is VERY important. its how you get the modal sound. so you need to treat it as G mixolydian and not C major.

another thing that people tend to do and think is modal playing, is taking for example a G major progression and putting the G mixolydian over it. technically, thats just accidentals, not modal playing. modal playing often involves a vamp, or a static chord or drone note. this is because modes are strict in their sound. once you start using more chords and create a progression, you start to lose the modal suggestion and go off into "key" territory where modes dont apply.

also about this whole "everyone thinks modes are advanced', i find that odd too. i think its probably because we are so used to the music we hear that modal music seems more complex. in actual fact, its LESS. but it's still different so we tend to think "hey, im playing less obvious sounding stuff so ill seem like i know more" (im not saying thats what OP is thinking). the thing is though, modal playing, ACTUAL modal playing is almost never used. its usually just accidentals posing as modal playing. i mean, if it helps you arrange your accidentals then great. i use "dorian" licks in blues all the time. but the problems stem when you mistake that for modal playing and then teach that to others as a way to add "flavour" to your playing.

i think it might have to do with the fact that most guitarists are self taught and teaching them about accidentals and formulas is boring and wont sell DVDs or books. its a lot easier to say "dorian mode" and give a scale pattern than to explain using a "flat this" or a "raised that". giving a scale pattern is more to the point and easy to read and apply almost instantly.