#1
So, I feel like my songwriting is coming along. I've fully written 3 songs, as well as many parts and pieces, and in my mind, they get better each time. I've also done a good job keeping them sounding different from each other. Now I have a few pieces that would fit very well into one song, they are similar stylistically, and they match up well energy and tempo-wise. My biggest problem is that I can't get them to flow together. I know I could just put a drum fill or something, and switch, but that's very clunky, and I've already used similar methods on one of my other songs. How do you guys write transitions? What suggestions do you have for me? Also, If it helps, I have a bassist, drummer, violinist, and keyboard player in my band.
#2
Make sure that the different parts are in the same key. That's probably the issue you're having.

If each of the pieces is in a different key, link them together using a chord that is shared by both keys.

For example. Say you're one part is in E minor and the next part that you want to make a transition to is in A minor. Right before you switch to the A minor riff, play a G major chord.
#3
Good ways to blend different parts are to use long pedal notes, double stopping, note halving and doubling to slow or speed it up.
#4
Get your parts in the same key, your bass player should be the one with the most knowledge about this stuff coz making shit flow is what playing bass is all about, just yeah jame em out till you find something, if a band member wants to stop the jam at any point let him and try to sue his concept, modify, etc. it should end up working.
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#5
Quote by CSMusic
Make sure that the different parts are in the same key. That's probably the issue you're having.

If each of the pieces is in a different key, link them together using a chord that is shared by both keys.

For example. Say you're one part is in E minor and the next part that you want to make a transition to is in A minor. Right before you switch to the A minor riff, play a G major chord.


To modulate to a new key, you need the 5th of the new key, playing to chord 1... so G Major wouldn't put you into a different key. You want to play E Major to get into A Minor.

Going from E Minor to E Major, to modulate to A Minor, would be raising the third of the E, so that you're using a technique called Tierce de picardie. This would be putting you in a Harmonic Minor and you'd have a G#.
You could just go from E Minor to A Minor, but you're in A Natural minor there. With the raised third, you're adding spic to the harmony. Try it. :P
#7
Oh yeah, i guess it would be best to tell you what I know first. I know what keys are, how to play in a key w/ chords and notes, and that's about it as far as theory goes (unless you count inversions, i don't really know). We write songs through improv, and then add on from there. I think I have a pretty good sense of how things work together (in terms of what sounds good, not in a technical sense), and how the next part should sound, I just have a difficult time linking them. I was thinking more along the lines of what to do with the riff to get it to play into the next part easily. I hear a lot of bands throw in a variation to the riff every third one or so, and make that the final one before the next part as well. So, I was basically looking for techniques like that. Rhys-all of your first ideas sounded good, ill go give them a try. Do you guys have any more like those? thanks everyone!
#8
I hate to say you can't do it, but in general, throwing together a bunch of riffs doesn't work in songwriting. It won't be cohesive, even if it does flow. You have to start with an idea and build off of that, rather than getting a bunch of ideas and tossing them together.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#9
Quote by rhys digby
To modulate to a new key, you need the 5th of the new key, playing to chord 1... so G Major wouldn't put you into a different key. You want to play E Major to get into A Minor.

Going from E Minor to E Major, to modulate to A Minor, would be raising the third of the E, so that you're using a technique called Tierce de picardie. This would be putting you in a Harmonic Minor and you'd have a G#.
You could just go from E Minor to A Minor, but you're in A Natural minor there. With the raised third, you're adding spic to the harmony. Try it. :P

you dont NEED to use the dominant, its one of the many ways of modulation.
The way he mentioned, is by use of a pivot chord, which is very common. So his method is usable, as is yours.
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#10
Quote by food1010
I hate to say you can't do it, but in general, throwing together a bunch of riffs doesn't work in songwriting. It won't be cohesive, even if it does flow. You have to start with an idea and build off of that, rather than getting a bunch of ideas and tossing them together.

That's not what I was saying. I did start out with a base idea, and then build off of it,
I just cant get the parts that I built to flow from one to the next easily. I have one melody, and I need to go into the next part, which, in this particular song happens to be another melody part. And what do you mean by cohesive? If it flows, and has a nice arc from beginning to end, isn't that technically cohesive?
#11
Quote by C_Hart
And what do you mean by cohesive? If it flows, and has a nice arc from beginning to end, isn't that technically cohesive?
That's exactly what I mean.

Honestly, it's hard for us to give you general advice on transitions. If you show us two of your sections, we might be able to give you more specific advice.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea