#1
I know all of the big guitar companies do this to build their guitars, but has anyone here built a guitar this way, or knows someone who has? How would I go about doing something like this? Do I look for a local company that does CNC machining, give them the info they need, and then just pay them to do it? How much would it cost?
#2
It would cost far too much to be worth it. It takes a lot of time to set up the CNC's computer to do it right, and might take a few test runs to work out any kinks. Lots of guitar companies do it because they are making a high enough number of bodies/necks to offset the high cost of the initial investment.

Places like Warmoth machines bodies and necks for people making guitars as its business, and has everything already set up. Going to Warmoth or one of the other places that do this is your only real option if you want a body or neck machined.
#3
Unless you have a friend in the business that can do it for you, it will cost too much.

You could however, find someone who is in school for machining (Numerical Control Technician is the program name) and they could possibly do it as a project.

Last year for my NCT Degree I made custom pedal enclosures and a guitar body, both turned out extremely well.
#4
It wouldnt be bad if designed on a computer and sent to the machine. i imagine everyone has these though now. i had to manually input like 100's of lines before on one before. it sucked.

my teacher cut out a flying v for fun it was only 9 inches long though.
#5
I've made all my guitars on CNC Machines!! You better be sure everything is designed right though because it's really easy to mess up a blank! To answer TS's question, it is way too expensive to make a single guitar. Most shops (in the Montreal area anyway) charge between $55 to $120 an hour for design and manufacturing.. Unless you can supply a CADCAM design and just pay for the machining and are willing to make more than one guitar, I don't recommend you got this way.
#6
Quote by ethansj1
It wouldnt be bad if designed on a computer and sent to the machine. i imagine everyone has these though now. i had to manually input like 100's of lines before on one before. it sucked.

my teacher cut out a flying v for fun it was only 9 inches long though.


Yeah, pretty much everything is done on the computer these days, hardly any "hand" programming.

Hell, even most of the old Bridgeports have a digital readout with a CNC control setup these days, the programming takes a little longer than a program like Mastercam, but it is effective and a lot better than trying to figure out all the dimensions by hand.

Most every shop around here charges a $50 core charge then they charge the hourly rate. Now, if you had someone program it for you and it was done right, it would take like 30 minutes to run a whole body (assuming the body is planed and the right thickness already). But shops hourly fees can and usually are pretty steep, you end up paying as much, if not more as buying a Warmoth body and certainly more than a GFS body.