#1
I am currently working my way through learn and master guitar and as a shortcut i write the name of the notes as opposed to sight reading them as i can play quicker doing this is there any particular disadvantage to this?

want to get better at playing guitar rather than stare at sheet music and convert the notes in my head and then play them
#2
You want to learn properly by writing down everything before you play it?

So if you get given a piece of music to play, you have to spend a while writing all the notes before you can play it?

Learn the traditional way.. it feels harder but writing them out before hand doesn't help because you won't be actively thinking about it.
#3
Quote by hilts1969
I am currently working my way through learn and master guitar and as a shortcut i write the name of the notes as opposed to sight reading them as i can play quicker doing this is there any particular disadvantage to this?

want to get better at playing guitar rather than stare at sheet music and convert the notes in my head and then play them


yes, there's a major disadvantage to doing this - you never learn to read music. progress will be extremely minimal, if at all.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#4
At first it's okay to write the notes above the stave so you know what note it is.

But I think it should be done only in the beginning of learning tracks from sheet music.

I did it for the first couple of jazz tunes I learnt from The Real Book, but whenever I learn 'em now I do it without.

It's a case of getting them all in your head. If you figure it out then write it every time you read music you're going to get into a bad habit.
So only use it as a way to initially kickstart you til you know the notes without hesitation.
#5
Quote by AeolianWolf
yes, there's a major disadvantage to doing this - you never learn to read music. progress will be extremely minimal, if at all.


it is something im planning on doing but i feel at this stage when im trying to get correct technique(finger span in first position), correct notes, picking, keeping in time with the metronome etc... looking at a note working out its a g then converting that to the correct string and then playing it is going to be so slow

can i set the metronome to 1 beat per minute lol

i thought once i can play half decent and have spent months actually looking at a piece of mucisc and writing down the notes i will learn to read quicker if i dont have a dozen other things to think about
#6
yeah--you wont actually be able to play. read the notes, go as slow as you need to (even out of time if absolutely neccesary, when your just beginning), but any such shortcuts (tab, doing this), will only hurt you. stay basic, avoid half notes (possibly even quarter notes) when your starting.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#7
Quote by tehREALcaptain
yeah--you wont actually be able to play. read the notes, go as slow as you need to (even out of time if absolutely neccesary, when your just beginning), but any such shortcuts (tab, doing this), will only hurt you. stay basic, avoid half notes (possibly even quarter notes) when your starting.



thanks for the advice fella wish i had learnt properly when i started a couple of years ago, just messed about with open chords and the odd riff, now having to almost start from scratch

really should have concentrated on technique, music reading and solo's earlier rather that trailing thru you tube trying to find interresting songs that just use chords
#8
Quote by hilts1969
I am currently working my way through learn and master guitar and as a shortcut i write the name of the notes as opposed to sight reading them as i can play quicker doing this is there any particular disadvantage to this?

want to get better at playing guitar rather than stare at sheet music and convert the notes in my head and then play them


well if the goal is to learn how to read music then the disadvantage is that you're not actually reading. It's hard to get better at something without actually doing it.

now if you're just concerned with technique, I wouldn't even bother with sheet music just yet. Instead I would concentrate on learning songs and playing.
shred is gaudy music
#9
Quote by GuitarMunky
well if the goal is to learn how to read music then the disadvantage is that you're not actually reading. It's hard to get better at something without actually doing it.

now if you're just concerned with technique, I wouldn't even bother with sheet music just yet. Instead I would concentrate on learning songs and playing.


cheers mate think i will concentrate on technique for now, if i try to do too much at once i can lose interest

thanks for the websites they look good have bookmarked them
#10
Quote by hilts1969
it is something im planning on doing but i feel at this stage when im trying to get correct technique(finger span in first position), correct notes, picking, keeping in time with the metronome etc... looking at a note working out its a g then converting that to the correct string and then playing it is going to be so slow

can i set the metronome to 1 beat per minute lol

i thought once i can play half decent and have spent months actually looking at a piece of mucisc and writing down the notes i will learn to read quicker if i dont have a dozen other things to think about


if you're just starting to learn to read, you don't have to worry about tempo. do it at your own pace. start employing the metronome when you have at least a basic familiarity with reading.

maybe it's a good idea for you to focus on technique for another couple of months. then you'll have the technique you need and you won't have to occupy yourself with every facet of guitar. take it one step at a time.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#11
Quote by hilts1969
I am currently working my way through learn and master guitar and as a shortcut i write the name of the notes as opposed to sight reading them as i can play quicker doing this is there any particular disadvantage to this?

want to get better at playing guitar rather than stare at sheet music and convert the notes in my head and then play them



As has been posted.

THat's not sight reading.

Now -- if you are looking to speed up the learning process, I can understand working out to memorize notes on the neck.

But the best approach, IMO, is based on William Leavitt's books -- positional playing gets a lot of guitar players to the promised land.
#12
I recommend learning the old fashioned way.
Learn to read music :p

Once you get a basic grasp of the tune, grab a metronome and set to a tempo that you feel comfortable learning the riff at. Tap your foot along with it to help with the timing.
Then increase the tempo by 5 beats per minute [BPM], play it at that tempo then repeat until you get to the tempo to riff is meant to be played at.

Good luck man
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#14
I think it depends if you want the ability to read "prima vista" then yes, learn the notes but if not I think its ok I also think that if you do this for a while you will learn to recognize the notes without writing them down.

I have to say that I find reading the rhythm of the note much harder then the actual note. can you read the note's rhythm prima vista?
#15
Learning jazz tunes from the Real Book (i.e Autumn Leaves, Blue Bossa, Misty, Girl from Ipanema) helped me a lot. You can also go to 8notes.com and try to play simple sax or flute tunes like The Star Spangled Banner. I can sightread rather well now...now if only I could improvise...
#16
Quote by jayx124
I think it depends if you want the ability to read "prima vista" then yes, learn the notes but if not I think its ok I also think that if you do this for a while you will learn to recognize the notes without writing them down.

I have to say that I find reading the rhythm of the note much harder then the actual note. can you read the note's rhythm prima vista?


at the moment its all songs in the first position, if i write the notes above the music(g c c e etc) i can play the song reasonable well as i have memorised all notes on the first four frets, this allows me to try and improve my technique, speed and melody

if i started to try and play without writing the notes this would slow me down drastically and i dont feel i want to go from playing a song at 120 bpm to looking at a note taking a few seconds to realise its a g then play it

it only takes a couple of minutes to write the notes in then its done and im figuring using this method eventually after looking at the music and writing a note i will learn the position on the staff anyhow