#1
i see post after post asking "how do i make my amp tighter"
well, how would you make an amp "looser"? and is "sag" the opposite of "tight"?
can somebody post clips of a "tight" response and a "sag" response?
#2
If you use a cab an open back might help.
Gear:
Gibson SG Special Faded
Marshall JCM2000 DSL 401
#3
Quote by Major Sparky
If you use a cab an open back might help.


its nice to know about gear
but before gear, i'd like to hear examples of what people mean by "tight" and what is not "tight"
and if by "my amp-response isn't tight", then does that mean their amp is "saggy"?
and what does "sag" sound like?
#5
Oranges can be saggy/grainy. Every description of a tube amp with a tubescreamer in front of it has been described as "tighter". IDK really, "loose" sounds like the sort of term I'd use to describe sludge metal and stoner rock sounds. Big low end; maybe fuzz as opposed to just straight distortion?
Maximum volume yields maximum goats.
#6
I dunno if I'd call a JCM2000 tight. Tighter than a Recto yea, but when I hear tight I think Mesa Mark series, Fryette ULs, Diezel VH4, etc.

This is tight: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19UZd_DKs2Q
This is looser: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6yIRgMQzztc
This is loose: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IkbMd3Bygzs

For loose tones, you want a ton of bass pre clipping. For tight bass, you want a pretty big cut below 200Hz or so.

Sag is a completely different thing. It's where the power supply can't supply the current that the tubes are drawing during the initial attack and therefore compresses and drops the volume some before recovering and raising the volume of the decay a bit. This sounds like complete ass IMO but a bunch of blues guys love it so YMMV.
E-peen:
Rhodes Gemini
Fryette Ultra Lead
Peavey 6505
THD Flexi 50

Gibson R0 Prototype
EBMM JP13 Rosewood
Fender CS Mary Kaye

WTLT

(512) Audio Engineering - Custom Pedal Builds, Mods and Repairs
Last edited by mmolteratx at May 9, 2011,
#7
Quote by mmolteratx
I dunno if I'd call a JCM2000 tight. Tighter than a Recto yea, but when I hear tight I think Mesa Mark series, Fryette ULs, Diezel VH4, etc.

This is tight: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19UZd_DKs2Q
This is looser: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6yIRgMQzztc
This is loose: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IkbMd3Bygzs

For loose tones, you want a ton of bass pre clipping. For tight bass, you want a pretty big cut below 200Hz or so.

Sag is a completely different thing. It's where the power supply can't supply the current that the tubes are drawing during the initial attack and therefore compresses and drops the volume some before recovering and raising the volume of the decay a bit. This sounds like complete ass IMO but a bunch of blues guys love it so YMMV.


excellent, thanks for the clips. that explains a lot

do you have examples of sag vs non-sag?
#8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lsl76DzTecg

There's some mild sag at the beginning of this vid. I can't really find any heavy examples. If you want to hear that, get a really cheap compressor and turn the sustain/compress knob all the way up with some high output humbuckers.

EDIT: Clapton with John Mayall has a fairly large amount of sag too.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkulcvRkd4I&feature=related
E-peen:
Rhodes Gemini
Fryette Ultra Lead
Peavey 6505
THD Flexi 50

Gibson R0 Prototype
EBMM JP13 Rosewood
Fender CS Mary Kaye

WTLT

(512) Audio Engineering - Custom Pedal Builds, Mods and Repairs
Last edited by mmolteratx at May 9, 2011,
#9
Sag is more of a feel thing. The listener doesn't really experience it. It's an amp response and as Matt said a lot of blues guys get really inspired by the feel.
#10
A loose sound has a lot to do with the string tunings. When you play in drop c or b you can get a way looser sound, hence snowblinds tone. It's not from the amp as much from the string tension IMO. You can have a tight dual rec sound. I'd a say tight may be confused for a brighter sound.
Gear:

Squier Strat
Epiphone Explorer
Agile AL-3100

No AMP
#11
Quote by evmac
A loose sound has a lot to do with the string tunings. When you play in drop c or b you can get a way looser sound, hence snowblinds tone. It's not from the amp as much from the string tension IMO. You can have a tight dual rec sound. I'd a say tight may be confused for a brighter sound.




you don't have to have a loose sound in drop c or b...?

are all basses loose to you then??
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#12
Quote by evmac
A loose sound has a lot to do with the string tunings. When you play in drop c or b you can get a way looser sound, hence snowblinds tone. It's not from the amp as much from the string tension IMO. You can have a tight dual rec sound. I'd a say tight may be confused for a brighter sound.


Actually, it has almost everything to do with the amp. As Matt stated above, bass response throughout the signal chain is a major factor in how "loose" or "tight" an amp sounds/feels. This rings particularly true in high gain circuits.