Page 1 of 2
#1
Is being able to play with a click metronome. Hands down the most useful skill any musician should ever have. Imagine going into the studio for the first time, nearly 99% percent of recordings use a click track. No click, no studio. Now imagine playing a show where you have backing tracks. How is your band going to sync with them? You need a click track in your monitor to be able to play to that. No click, no backing tracks.

The point of the thread is that the metronome is one of the most forgotten and undervalued tools for drummers, where it should be used every time you practice. It will not only make you a better drummer, but it'll generally make you have a better perception and understanding of timing if you decide to switch instruments.
#2
I think this should just apply to instruments in general. Metronomes are extremely under rated.
"For we are nothing without brotherhood and brotherhood is nothing without our brothers" -We Came As Romans
#3
of course what is even better is if you can play along to a particular tempo/time without the use of a click track not that i can, mind...
EH


"Show me war; show me pestilence; show me the blood-red hands of retribution..."
#4
As both a guitarist and drummer, amen to that. I practice with a metronome all the time, and it has really helped me to step it up on both instruments. The clicks don't lie.
#5
Buddy Rich laughs at you.
Isn't it a pity?
Now, isn't it a shame?
How we break each other's hearts,
And cause each other pain...


"Music is everybody's possession. It's only publishers who think that people own it." - John Lennon
#6
I use mine all the time when I'm on my own, but its just as important to learn to play with a metronome as it to play without one
Spiraling Up Through the Crack in the Sky...

...Leaving Material World Behind...


SOUNDCLOUD

GT - Elite Curbstomp
#7
Timing is everything in drumming, doesn't matter how good your rolls etc are if you can't keep good time. Lots of drummers here like that.
#9
Quote by 007dude
Buddy Rich laughs at you.


this.

1 2 3 4
2 2 3 4
3 2 3 4
4 2 3 4

1 e and a 2 e and a 3 e and a 4 e and a

an cho vi an cho vi an cho vi an cho vi

no need for metronomes for drummers, a drummer is the time keeper of the band. Maybe for a guitarist he might need one if he doesn't have a drummer to jam with. I was always taught to count it out in my head, and please remember that you're wrist is the only true metronome. Even going in to the studio they give the drummer headphones so he can actually hear what he is jamming along to. Maybe these things might help a beginner drummer just starting out but once you develop a basic technique those things are useless.
#10
A drummer that can't/doesn't ever play to a metronome is like a blunt without the bud.

Period.

Even without the sense of time it lends (honestly when recording it's more important than being able to read music), developing speed with a metronome is crucial. Or any other aspect of technique, really. And it's hardly undervalued, pretty much every drummer that actually takes themselves seriously uses one, some more than others-- I personally practice quite literally everything with a metronome, which I would also recommend... I don't use one live since I'm not really sure how to make an actual tempo map and have the metronome going on at the same time and stuff, I probably wouldn't use one either way though, unless I was in a band where all the other members wanted to.
Last edited by Steve08 at May 10, 2011,
#11
Quote by drummer420
no need for metronomes for drummers, a drummer is the time keeper of the band. Maybe for a guitarist he might need one if he doesn't have a drummer to jam with. I was always taught to count it out in my head, and please remember that you're wrist is the only true metronome. Even going in to the studio they give the drummer headphones so he can actually hear what he is jamming along to. Maybe these things might help a beginner drummer just starting out but once you develop a basic technique those things are useless.



This is the typical ideology of someone who can't play with a click. Metronomes are not useless, and I'm willing to bet that the person mentioned learned to play with a click, especially since he's a jazz drummer. I'm aware they give drummer headphones, what do you think is playing in them? A click track, and possibly a guitar track. The best drummers wouldn't even need a guitar track.


Quote by Steve08
A drummer that can't/doesn't ever play to a metronome is like a blunt without the bud.

Period.

Even without the sense of time it lends (honestly when recording it's more important than being able to read music), developing speed with a metronome is crucial. Or any other aspect of technique, really. And it's hardly undervalued, pretty much every drummer that actually takes themselves seriously uses one, some more than others-- I personally practice quite literally everything with a metronome, which I would also recommend... I don't use one live since I'm not really sure how to make an actual tempo map and have the metronome going on at the same time and stuff, I probably wouldn't use one either way though, unless I was in a band where all the other members wanted to.


This is a very good post, although I do think they are undervalued. I know maybe one drummer who practices with a metronome, and I've recorded around 6 drummers. My band is actually working on practicing to a click in order to start playing with one live, for extreme tightness.
Last edited by llanafreak44 at May 10, 2011,
#12
Go look at any Buddy Rich video on YouTube and look! No headphones! Why? 'cause he's the real deal. The drummer IS the metronome/click track. Why even bother having a drummer if you are going to use a click track anyway?

OK, I agree metronomes/click tracks are great for beginners, but I don't see why they are so important for an accomplished player. The most important skill a drummer can have is groove. It's what separates drummers from metronomes. You can be the most robotic player ever, not even being a millisecond off, but if you have no groove, you're automatically rubbish.
Isn't it a pity?
Now, isn't it a shame?
How we break each other's hearts,
And cause each other pain...


"Music is everybody's possession. It's only publishers who think that people own it." - John Lennon
#13
Drumming to a click is great, in fact, performing anything perfectly to a click in the studio is a great skill to have, but I wouldn't say its the number one skill for a drummer to have.

IMO, the best skill a drummer can have is the ability to jam. I know many drummers who can play double kick at stupid speeds (think As Blood Runs Black style) but cannot jam at all. As such, they'd be useless in a band, that write good original material.

Thats why, despite his tidy, no frills drumming, I think Chad Smith is an excellent drummer.

This is all my opinion of course, feel free to disagree.
#14
Most drummers I see don't use metronomes live, but they are still completely useful for building up speed and making sure you are playing every note in the correct place. I would only use one live if I really needed to, but for practicing its invaluable to me.
Spiraling Up Through the Crack in the Sky...

...Leaving Material World Behind...


SOUNDCLOUD

GT - Elite Curbstomp
#15
Quote by 007dude
Go look at any Buddy Rich video on YouTube and look! No headphones! Why? 'cause he's the real deal. The drummer IS the metronome/click track. Why even bother having a drummer if you are going to use a click track anyway?

OK, I agree metronomes/click tracks are great for beginners, but I don't see why they are so important for an accomplished player. The most important skill a drummer can have is groove. It's what separates drummers from metronomes. You can be the most robotic player ever, not even being a millisecond off, but if you have no groove, you're automatically rubbish.



There's a difference between performance and practicing. I'm not saying you have to use clicks live, if you play jazz you mostly won't use one live anyways. The point is practicing. I stand by my statement where I'm willing to bet that he practices/had intense practice with a click at one point.
#16
Quote by 007dude
Go look at any Buddy Rich video on YouTube and look! No headphones! Why? 'cause he's the real deal. The drummer IS the metronome/click track. Why even bother having a drummer if you are going to use a click track anyway?

OK, I agree metronomes/click tracks are great for beginners, but I don't see why they are so important for an accomplished player. The most important skill a drummer can have is groove. It's what separates drummers from metronomes. You can be the most robotic player ever, not even being a millisecond off, but if you have no groove, you're automatically rubbish.
They also didn't have headphones back in the 50s

Keep in mind that I have never played with a metronome live (mostly due to lack of knowledge on how to make a click track, heh), but I use it only for practice and recording. If you say it's a bad idea to use one for either of those things then I GUARANTEE that you have no idea what you're talking about. Heck, Vinnie freaking Colaiuta said he had to play to a metronome 97% of the time when recording... would you say he plays like a robot?

Also... you can be the tightest drummer on the planet, and still lay down a slamming groove. You're acting as if playing on time without straying from the tempo somehow sacrifices your ability to feel. And you know what? You're wrong. Sorry.
#17
Quote by llanafreak44
There's a difference between performance and practicing. I'm not saying you have to use clicks live, if you play jazz you mostly won't use one live anyways. The point is practicing. I stand by my statement where I'm willing to bet that he practices/had intense practice with a click at one point.



Oh really?

"Now imagine playing a show where you have backing tracks. How is your band going to sync with them? You need a click track in your monitor to be able to play to that. No click, no backing tracks."

Sorry, it sounds to me you are talking about performing live. Or did I misread that?

Practicing with it is great, sure, but I still stand by my opinion that it's not necessary nor the best skill for PERFORMANCE. Maybe it's my fault for not stating that explicitly, for that I apologize.

Quote by Steve08
They also didn't have headphones back in the 50s

Keep in mind that I have never played with a metronome live (mostly due to lack of knowledge on how to make a click track, heh), but I use it only for practice and recording. If you say it's a bad idea to use one for either of those things then I GUARANTEE that you have no idea what you're talking about. Heck, Vinnie freaking Colaiuta said he had to play to a metronome 97% of the time when recording... would you say he plays like a robot?

Also... you can be the tightest drummer on the planet, and still lay down a slamming groove. You're acting as if playing on time without straying from the tempo somehow sacrifices your ability to feel. And you know what? You're wrong. Sorry.


They did have headphones back in the 50s... please research the history of them. It isn't the same type we have today of course, but they did exist at the time.

But anyway, I didn't say it's a bad idea to use a click track, I just said I don't see why OP considers it to be the "best skill" for a drummer to have.

I also didn't say using a metronome/click track makes you a robot, I said not having a groove makes you a robot.

I'm also not saying that playing in time makes you lose your feel, where you got that from, I have no idea. I said groove is more important than the ability to play to a click track. Like I said before, "Why even bother having a drummer if you are going to use a click track anyway?" because drummers have grooves, whereas click tracks do not.

I'm not wrong, you just cannot read and process information properly. Sorry.
Isn't it a pity?
Now, isn't it a shame?
How we break each other's hearts,
And cause each other pain...


"Music is everybody's possession. It's only publishers who think that people own it." - John Lennon
Last edited by 007dude at May 10, 2011,
#18
Hm, I did some research and found out it was highly uncommon to use click tracks back in the 70s and 80s. Maybe it's my old fashioned nature, but I'm still against the idea of using a click track in a recording, live or in studio.

Quotes from comments on the internet:

(regarding John Bonham): "It just wasn’t common to use a click track back then, John Bonham had a great feel anyway. Some Zeppelins tracks do drift slightly in and out of perfect time, but it doesn’t take anything away from the quality of the music."

(general comment): "I examined one myself for a tempo matching tutorial in my blog. It’s Bohemian Rhapsody from Queen. It’s no surprize to me that many of these bands almost never used metronomes. But I use the click tracks to lead/help the musician anyway. If they drift a little of the grid, no biggie."

(main blog): "Based on this super fascinating article I found over at MusicMachinery.com, many of my favorite tunes were never recorded to a click. Yet another example of performance trumping perfection. Don’t get me wrong, click tracks have their place, but they should never get in the way of the song’s emotion." [http://musicmachinery.com/2009/03/02/in-search-of-the-click-track/]

(from the site) "The click track has a down side – some say that songs recorded against a click track sound sterile, that the missing tempo deviations added life to a song."

Those last two quotes are what I believe in.

Looking at drummers like Starr, Bonham, Moon; those are the guys I look up to. I know they're nothing compared to drummers of today (technique-wise), and maybe it's because of these guy's influence that I'm disagreeing with this thread, but I still believe in the good old fashioned drummer; just him, the kit, and a pair of sticks. With spares of course.

(Regarding performance, live or in studio, NOT practice!)
Isn't it a pity?
Now, isn't it a shame?
How we break each other's hearts,
And cause each other pain...


"Music is everybody's possession. It's only publishers who think that people own it." - John Lennon
#19
Personally, I only use a metronome when working on new rudiments or beats that I'm having trouble with, so I can work out the details at a slow tempo, and then build up. I don't really think being able to play to a click is that important for a performing musician. My band tends to change between different dynamics a lot, and I feel like being able to play based on the energy the band has between the members is a lot more important than playing with perfect time.
#20
The only time I ever use a metronome is when I'm working on rudiments, trying to build up speed. I've tried using one during jam sessions and it's just distracting to me. Keeping the beat in a performance situation isn't that hard as long as you've got an ounce of feel.

Having groove is by far the most important skill for a drummer, in my opinion.

#21
Quote by 007dude
Oh really?

"Now imagine playing a show where you have backing tracks. How is your band going to sync with them? You need a click track in your monitor to be able to play to that. No click, no backing tracks."

Sorry, it sounds to me you are talking about performing live. Or did I misread that?

Practicing with it is great, sure, but I still stand by my opinion that it's not necessary nor the best skill for PERFORMANCE. Maybe it's my fault for not stating that explicitly, for that I apologize.



You're quoting it out of context, it says right there if you have backing tracks, aka pre recorded material that you and your band are playing with.


Quote by 007dude

Looking at drummers like Starr, Bonham, Moon; those are the guys I look up to. I know they're nothing compared to drummers of today (technique-wise), and maybe it's because of these guy's influence that I'm disagreeing with this thread, but I still believe in the good old fashioned drummer; just him, the kit, and a pair of sticks. With spares of course.

(Regarding performance, live or in studio, NOT practice!)



Those drummers are extremely talented, the 1% of drummers that exist. They probably didn't need a metronome, yes. Everyone else, especially with how physically/technically demanding modern day drumming is, yes they need a metronome.
Last edited by llanafreak44 at May 10, 2011,
#22
Keeping time is the drummer's main job and click tracks have their place. I think their place is in practice and sometimes recording(not all the time).

Having groove is really more important than being able to play to a click track to me anyway.

Performance wise, click tracks aren't really necessary even if you have backing tracks.

Drummers should develop a great sense of time though so click tracks are still important....for practice .
#23
Playing to a click track or metronome is not even a skill so thats why I said what I said. You say in this post playing along to a metronome is hands down the best skill a drummer could have and that is false so I felt like I should say something. A drummer does not need a metronome to play lol that's hogwash it's so untrue man. Sure some people might rely on it but it's far from being a skill and mainly used for beginners to accumulate accurate timing. Don't just take my word for it either I have seen an amazing drummer that would drum circles around me and he told me that metronomes are for pussies he hates metronomes. Example of why we don't need them to play.. anytime I ever jammed with my older bands the guitar player would be the guy to follow my beats on drums because I am the time keeper. If the timing didn't match up the guitar player would be doing something wrong because I am usually counting it out in my head. So how would it be any different in a studio? Maybe if the drummer wasn't recording at the same time as the guitarist it would be different. Guitarists would benefit most from a metronome if they don't have a drummer to jam along with because i'm sure you guys don't count when you play riffs.
#24
I had a feeling this thread would show up...

The way I see it, metronomes are important. And this is coming from a guy who NEVER used one in the beginning, and hardly EVER uses one now. They're not essential, but they're damn well helpful and I think it's because their importance isn't stressed enough that alot of drummers don't take them seriously. I almost always use one in a studio situation and when i'm learning new beats and fills.

Genres like hip-hop/metal (Prog and Thrash/Exteme especially) to an extent jazz as well and also dance/techno, all recquire extensive use of the metronome for accuracy and tighter playing.

Also, a metronome is there as GUIDE people! It's like a map or a sat nav, you don't need to stick to it to get where you're going. I've seen plenty of drummers stick a click on and just play on beat, off beat, and just off time and basically just around the click instead of being perfectly on time. So you can groove with a 'nome on.

Having said that, anyone who says you "need a metronome, it's like air, those who don't use them are worthless" blah blah blah, also have the wrong idea. Sure it's immensely helpful, but some drummers actually find it easier to play without one, and they can keep time just as well. Now whether that might be because they're not used to a tick or whatever, I don't know... But being in the studio with lots of other drummers, I've seen just how many prefer it without a click.

Now my problem with this lies with the OP, if it's performing with backing tracks and pre recorded material, then by all means you'll almost certainly need to use a click, or play with a click because it's a machine that's playing, not a human being that would perceive what is going on and adjust to it. And that's really only one scenario you're describing here so ofcourse you're going to need to be able to use one.
Neo Evil11
Quote by jambi_mantra
They let black people on Fox now?

They also let white people into the KFC and the NBA now.
#25
If you learn with a metronome from the beginning, then it just becomes second nature.

It's like playing guitar with a pick; once you can do it, it's easy and you don't give it a second thought.

So I don't really think that playing with a metronome is the BEST skill a drummer can have... I don't know if I even consider it a skill. It's just something any drummer should be able to do. If you didn't learn with a metronome from the start, but you learned to play the drums wrong.

When I Use A Metronome:

1) Practicing Rudiments and Techniques
2) Practicing specific songs independantly
3) In-Studio

When I Don't Use A Metronome:

1) Jamming
2) Practicing with my band
3) Writing
4) Playing Live


And just on a little side note, just because I have to say this. Whoever mentioned "backing tracks," firstly, why does your band need to use backing tracks? Does your band suck so much that you need a backing track to make you sound good, or play parts you can't play? Like why the hell do you need one, can't you recreate the songs yourself on stage? If you can't play live without the use of a backing track, then you suck lol. Sorry but I just really hate backing tracks; they take so much away from a performance; whenever I see a band using a backing track I just ****ing leave. It's always boring as ****.
#26
Quote by Stud_Muffin
Drumming to a click is great, in fact, performing anything perfectly to a click in the studio is a great skill to have, but I wouldn't say its the number one skill for a drummer to have.

IMO, the best skill a drummer can have is the ability to jam. I know many drummers who can play double kick at stupid speeds (think As Blood Runs Black style) but cannot jam at all. As such, they'd be useless in a band, that write good original material.

Thats why, despite his tidy, no frills drumming, I think Chad Smith is an excellent drummer.

This is all my opinion of course, feel free to disagree.

Dave Lombardo once said Slayer can't jam, including himself; yet I would not dare to call him useless in a band. I still agree with you on the point that being able to jam can make you a better drummer, but it isn't an absolutely necessary skill.
If I'm high, does that make me a Flying Dutchman?

Legal weed, windmills, clogs, and speed cameras. Welcome to the Netherlands!
#27
Metronomes are commonly used among anyone who SERIOUSLY practices an instrument. And band practice is a time when you had better be using a metronome. I would instantly fire a drummer who did not, and could not keep time.
Quote by UtBDan
this man hits the nail on the head.
#28
A drummer (or any musician) who can play with a click is a very valuable asset indeed, as they have a great sense of timing. It is a skill despite what others have said here, to be able to play in time with a click and still keep a natural feeling about it.

Obviously some issues do arise though, specifically "are you playing with, or at the same time as the click?".

Now I do see people shouting out here "in the studio, you always use a click". Well that's just plain wrong. You use a click in the studio if your drummer practices regularly with a click and feels at home doing it. If your drummer doesn't, you just plain don't do it. You aim to keep a consistent timing across the song as you do when you play live. There may be some slight speeding up or slowing down, but it's usually not noticeable.

As for the most important skill a drummer can have, I believe it is the ability to play at different volumes whilst still achieving a good sound from the drums.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#29
It might just be me, but drummers should definitely be able to play to a click when needed (studio in particular), but when jamming or playing live, as long as the drummer is fairly consistent and not all over the place with the tempo, that's all that matters. He shouldn't be a robot up there, that wouldn't be too exciting...the tempo should fluctuate live, that's live music. A good drummer will be able to work the tempo with the band, depending on the mood. Hearing a drummer play perfectly to a click is boring as hell, no life. Watch some live Jazz videos on youtube, that's a perfect example, those guys are all over the place, and yet the drummer still has perfect control over the song.
#30
Quote by AmericanZero13
It might just be me, but drummers should definitely be able to play to a click when needed (studio in particular), but when jamming or playing live, as long as the drummer is fairly consistent and not all over the place with the tempo, that's all that matters. He shouldn't be a robot up there, that wouldn't be too exciting...the tempo should fluctuate live, that's live music. A good drummer will be able to work the tempo with the band, depending on the mood. Hearing a drummer play perfectly to a click is boring as hell, no life. Watch some live Jazz videos on youtube, that's a perfect example, those guys are all over the place, and yet the drummer still has perfect control over the song.


Well the click doesn't read your mind in the studio. Are you suggesting it's better to opt for the "boring" performance in the studio?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#31
I think it's safe to say the Metronome won. Do as you will, if you feel you need it use it. If you think they are annoying never get one.

cheers
#32
Ive been trying to tell my drummer this for months...Why wont you guys listen to your guitarist??
Reverbnation.com/offthewitness
#33
Quote by AlanHB
Well the click doesn't read your mind in the studio. Are you suggesting it's better to opt for the "boring" performance in the studio?



No, and that's why I said when in the studio, they should be able to play with a click...but I was talking about jamming or playing live
#34
Quote by AmericanZero13
No, and that's why I said when in the studio, they should be able to play with a click...but I was talking about jamming or playing live


Of course if you want to capture the "feeling" or "vibe" of playing live on your recording, you'd want to record under identical circumstances.

In my experience, the best recordings are made when the band knows their parts to the point where they don't think about them, and can just "rock it out" in the studio, at least to the point where you can without an audience. I don't see the point in playing with a click "just because". You noted that the tempo fluctuations are really effective live, and really help the sound of the songs. Is there any reason this doesn't work in the studio?

There are of course other issues with a click in the studio. In one of my songs we start at full speed, cut down to half speed, then gradually work up to full speed again. Now should we work with a click in that circumstance? Perhaps cut out the click until it's at full speed again and hope that it's exactly in time again? Or just perform it as we usually do, and it doesn't matter if the final section's bars are half a second faster than the previous full-speed bars?

How about listening to a couple of your favourite bands and chuck a metronome on. Is it always in time? Would you have noticed without a metronome?

Edit: It just occurred to me that we may be clashing due to different types of recording and differing skill levels. I'll expand.

When I record with my bands, we usually the track all together a couple of times. The amps are in isolation rooms, the vocals are only played through the headphones. The sole purpose of these tracks is to capture the final recording of the bass and drums, and the vocals are used as a "guide track" when we re-do the guitar parts. After the guitar parts, the vocals are subbed in.

If you were just recording the drumming without any sort of guide, it would be a better choice to go with the click, at least to indicate where the drummer is, and to accommodate for stops and breaks.

Additionally the drummers I play/record with are at a higher skill/experience level than say, the 14-16 year old on their first year of playing drums, more familiar with their skill set and such so would be expected to hold a more constant tempo than a beginner. If I were chucking a beginner into the studio (of any instrument), I'd probably get them with a click track too, making them practice with the click for at least a month before.

In my most recent recording, we recorded without a click, and the variation of timing was somewhere between 0.1-0.2 secs a bar at the worst places. This was only noticed by the recording engineer, who has the time clock. We, and the audience, would never notice.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#35
I like this thread.

There are so many ways to look at it.

I would think there were forms of music before there were metronomes. Therefore you do not need one. Some people CAN keep PERFECT time. But alot of others cant.

I think for studio it is a must, no matter how good the musician there are always slip ups.

I also think its great for practice and to use always because its always going to be on time, it really can help the drummer relax and that leads to better fills and more creativity.


I am PRO Metronome over all but on the other hand what about the feel?? What about good build ups and the slip ups that actually make sense and sound great. You're never going to get any of that with a metronome.
Reverbnation.com/offthewitness
#36
Just watched a band in the studio.... They have several songs where there are a lot of tempo changes and they mapped it all out with a programmed metronome... Interesting....
Neo Evil11
Quote by jambi_mantra
They let black people on Fox now?

They also let white people into the KFC and the NBA now.
#37
Quote by AlanHB
As for the most important skill a drummer can have, I believe it is the ability to play at different volumes whilst still achieving a good sound from the drums.


My thoughts exactly. Good dynamics can accentuate even the most basic of drummer's beats. The differing ranges of volume are what really build up and level off the emotions of the listener. The drums are in essence the heartbeat of the song and as that sound becomes more pronounced, so too do the hearts of the crowd. A band with bad dynamics is like a six speed car that only works on a couple gears.
"Words"
Just As I Am

MD PRS Style Semi-Hollow
Epiphone Les Paul Classic
Mesa Dual Rectifier
2x12 Celestion 30's
Kustom 200
8x10 EMC's
#38
Quote by Niiko
Just watched a band in the studio.... They have several songs where there are a lot of tempo changes and they mapped it all out with a programmed metronome... Interesting....


Yep, very common. There's no legitimate excuse for a drummer to not know how to play to a click. To those about to rage, note that I said to be able to play to, not that they should always be able to.
#39
Quote by llanafreak44
Yep, very common. There's no legitimate excuse for a drummer to not know how to play to a click. To those about to rage, note that I said to be able to play to, not that they should always be able to.


I was under the impression it was pretty rare, ah well. And I agree, there's no real legitimate excuse not to be able to play with one unless, to me, you're just not used to it. I say this because I learned to keep time by air drumming to AC/DC songs, only because I used to be horrible using a metronome, but now my timing has improved I can comfortably play to a tick
Neo Evil11
Quote by jambi_mantra
They let black people on Fox now?

They also let white people into the KFC and the NBA now.
#40
Quote by 007dude

OK, I agree metronomes/click tracks are great for beginners, but I don't see why they are so important for an accomplished player. The most important skill a drummer can have is groove. It's what separates drummers from metronomes. You can be the most robotic player ever, not even being a millisecond off, but if you have no groove, you're automatically rubbish.

Ooooor, you know, you could have groove and also be able to play tight as hell to a metronome? Who said you can't have groove if you're tight as hell? Ridiculous claims you make sir.
Page 1 of 2