#1
Ive heard this done in a few different songs. One is opeth's "Drapery Falls" and the other most recent one is avenged sevenfold's "So Far Away". On drapery falls they use an ebow, but i dont think thats the case in so far away. Its just basically hes playing a note with vibrato and it seems to fade into a harmonic. What are some techniques to achieve this?
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#3
It's just feedback, yeah. Hold the note until it breaks into feedback and it'll get that tone. I usually do it with chords, but it's the same concept.
#4
oh nevermind. he uses a sustainiac.
Schecter Damien Elite Avenger FR
Schecter Damien Elite 7
Schecter Damien Elite
Epiphone Les Paul
Fender Stratocaster Fretless
Samick Dreadnaught Acoustic (Unknown Model)
Various Marshall Amplifiers
Boss SD-1
Boss CS-3
#5
"touch harmonic"? play a given note, say g-string/9th fret, then ligthly touch the same note an octave above on the 21st fret.
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#6
Quote by backtothe70s
"touch harmonic"? play a given note, say g-string/9th fret, then ligthly touch the same note an octave above on the 21st fret.

No, that has a distinct change. He's talking about when a harmonic slowly overtakes the actual played note. I usually do it with an eBow or a harmonic on a different track fading in. Live (or "the non-cheating way") would be done with feedback.
#7
John Petrucci does this by standing close to his cab. The note eventually reduces velocity enough for the sound waves from the speaker to vibrate the harmonic.