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#1
Hey guys, looking for a guitar for blues/rock. Stuff like Stevie Ray Vaughan, Whitesnake, Bad Company, etc, and the Epi Les Paul Standard seemed like a good choice. I was also looking at teles because of their unique sound, but I'm more of a humbucker guy. I also have NO interest in strats at the moment!

Budget: $400 used


Right now I'm looking at an Epiphone Les Paul Standard - http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Epiphone-Les-Paul-Standard-Plus-Top-Electric-Guitar?sku=518341

Or the tele - http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Fender-Standard-Telecaster-Electric-Guitar-Ash?sku=517885

I really dig Doug Aldrich's tone, so that's what attracted me to the Epi. I'll look at any other suggestions in my price range as well. Bear in mind, I don't mind swapping pickups in the future.
#3
Well, it could be quite good for Whitesnake. But I don't think that you would get that close to Stevie Ray Vaughan with a LP. That'd be more like a strat or a tele. Well, Aldrich sometimes plays teles too, at least seen him use them live.
Have you tried either of them? That's what is anyway the most effective factor. I wouldn't like to use a guitar I don't like to play cause of it's feel, even if the sound was awesome.
Gear pics

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#4
Get a tele with a humbucker/put a humbucker in a tele?
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#5
A les paul is just fine for blues, but not for SRV style blues. It's more of a Clapton, Mike Bloomfield type blues guitar.
#7
I have tried both, and wish I could afford both, because they are totally different!

I feel like I'd be sacrificing either way. For the LP, I wouldn't be able to get that pure blues tone. The tele delivered the blues goods, but lacked for me in the rock area. If I liked strats this would be a little easier to choose haha.

EDIT: In response to the above, do you think the stock pickups will deal fine with blues? I've never played a real Les Paul, so I don't know if I'm missing out with Epi pickups.
Last edited by baf250 at May 10, 2011,
#9
What about installing a coil split on the LP for single-coil tones?
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#10
Quote by ethan_hanus
Can you not buy the Epi and put some new pickups in it?

As I said in my original post, I will be able to do that when I get a little more cash.

Honestly I'm more concerned about the neck pup because thats what I primarily use for blues. What would be a good bluesy neck humbucker? I'd like to sound as close to a single coil as possible.

EDIT:
@Strat007 - How difficult is that to do? Is it expensive?
#11
Quote by Strat007
What about installing a coil split on the LP for single-coil tones?

this.


while tone purists may balk at it, nobody in a crowd is going to care or notice one bit.

edit: a SD pearly gates is a very good neck bucker for blues.
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#12
Quote by baf250
As I said in my original post, I will be able to do that when I get a little more cash.

Honestly I'm more concerned about the neck pup because thats what I primarily use for blues. What would be a good bluesy neck humbucker? I'd like to sound as close to a single coil as possible.

EDIT:
@Strat007 - How difficult is that to do? Is it expensive?


Then your gona want some kind of P-90 most likely. They are like oversized single coils that have a lot more low end to them.

I don't know of any good P-90's off the top of my head that would be in your price range. Prolly Seymore Duncan, they make some very good pickups.

EDIT: This is prolly what you would want, you want a humbucker sized P-90 so it'll fit in your guitar.

http://www.seymourduncan.com/products/electric/specialized/progressive/sph901_phat_cat/
Last edited by ethan_hanus at May 10, 2011,
#13
Quote by baf250

EDIT:
@Strat007 - How difficult is that to do? Is it expensive?

it's not that tough.

a good tech can do it in an hour. it would take a push pull pot for each pup. shouldn't cost more than $50-75 is my guess, unless the guy is an idiot.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#15
A used epiphone LP standard is about $300 if you get a good deal and add these: http://www.guitarcenter.com/Seymour-Duncan-Vintage-Blues--59-Humbucker-Set-103112462-i1127360.gc (I don't personally have them but my friend uses them and they sound so good) total=$430 which is right at your budget so thats what I suggest you'd come away with an awesome guitar
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Meh. Looks like an SE to me.
Well, thanks for confirming you know absolutely nothing about PRS guitars.
#16
Quote by gregs1020
it's not that tough.

a good tech can do it in an hour. it would take a push pull pot for each pup. shouldn't cost more than $50-75 is my guess, unless the guy is an idiot.

That actually sounds like a really good option, thank you!

Now to search for some P-90s!
#17
Wow that tele looks really nice

What about getting one of those Telecasters with P90s, or one of those Classic 72 Customs which have a humbucker in the neck? I think there are ones like these in the Squier Vintage Modern or Classic Vibe range, and I understand those high end (for want of a better word) squiers to be really impressive.
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Last edited by Hydra150 at May 10, 2011,
#18
you might be able to find a secondhand Gibson LP Studio for your $400 budget, I sold mine for that last year. if not the Epi standard is a good choice.
#19
Quote by Hydra150
What about getting one of those Telecasters with P90s, or one of those Classic 72 Customs which have a humbucker in the neck? I think there are ones like these in the Squier Vintage Modern or Classic Vibe range, and I understand those high end (for want of a better word) squiers to be really impressive.

I was actually considering one of the classic vibes because I heard good things, but I'm not so sure. I've never played one. If the necks are as tiny as I've heard, I'll avoid it.

As for the ESP, I played an ESP at my shop just last week and couldn't bond with it.
#20
Quote by baf250
That actually sounds like a really good option, thank you!

Now to search for some P-90s!

if you are using p-90s you won't need the coil tap.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#21
Im sure the necks are built to the same size as an actual fender
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#22
Quote by gregs1020
if you are using p-90s you won't need the coil tap.



This is true, you won't be able to use the coil taps with P-90's, but if he's on a budget, he can still have the coil tap done, and when he gets the P-90's, just wire it up normally, you can still use coil tap pots and wire it like a normal pot, it's just when you pull up on the pot it'll act like a kill switch, which could be useful.
#23
Quote by baf250
I have tried both, and wish I could afford both, because they are totally different!

I feel like I'd be sacrificing either way. For the LP, I wouldn't be able to get that pure blues tone. The tele delivered the blues goods, but lacked for me in the rock area. If I liked strats this would be a little easier to choose haha.

EDIT: In response to the above, do you think the stock pickups will deal fine with blues? I've never played a real Les Paul, so I don't know if I'm missing out with Epi pickups.
How does a les paul not deliver "pure blues tone"? Beano sounded pretty bluesy to me. As did Supersessions. And Live at Fillmore East. And so on...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkulcvRkd4I

Additionally, all of the 3 kings played Gibsons. As did John Lee Hooker. To characterize a les paul as not being a bluesy guitar is to judge it on a preconceived notion and hearing what you want to hear.

Imo, you don't get much bluesier than a les paul.
Last edited by al112987 at May 10, 2011,
#24
^I agree with you. He will get really bluesy with a Les Paul. Just that he stated "SRV sound" and I haven't heard it as a possibility with a stock Epi LP standard. Of course it could be close, but far from close enough.
Coil-split is a good idea too, so if you like the LP's feel go for it, maybe upgrade later on P-90's for it or other humbuckers with coil-split added so that you can get that single coil strat-like tone.
Gear pics

Quote by Cathbard
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#25
A telecaster doesn't exactly get you that SRV sound either. It's closer than a les paul, but SRV's tone was pretty unique for a strat, especially that 2nd and 4th position sound that he used so much. A standard tele is just not going to get those sounds. To get convincing SRV sounds, a strat is a pretty big part of the chain (along the right amps and pedals).

My personal preference has always been to have both a strat and a les paul because of their versatility. To me, the telecaster's best attribute is the bridge pickup sound, which no other guitar can quite seem to replicate.
Last edited by al112987 at May 10, 2011,
#26
Quote by baf250

Honestly I'm more concerned about the neck pup because thats what I primarily use for blues. What would be a good bluesy neck humbucker? I'd like to sound as close to a single coil as possible.


Gibson P-94
#27
If it has coil-splitting functionality or single-coil soapbar pickups, you can get a truly epic blues tone.
Barring both, it requires a bit of playing with the volume and tone controls to achieve anything near it, but you can still get a decent tone.

A lot of great tones were achieved by taking an instrument out of its comfort zone - the Les Paul was a jazz guitar at first in the hands of - among others - the person who lent it its name, but later became a hardrock legend by experiments with its overdriven tone.
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Last edited by PsiGuy60 at May 10, 2011,
#28
Quote by PsiGuy60
Barring both, it requires a bit of playing with the volume and tone controls to achieve anything near it, but you can still get a decent tone.
You're right, because when I plug a les paul into a Fender Super Reverb or Marshall JTM45, I can never get anything close to a blues tone unless I play with the volume and tone knobs.

I'm actually bewildered that people think that a les paul, as in a normal stock les paul with two humbuckers, is somehow not a suitable blues guitar. Especially when it has been used by blues guitarists for decades just as much as stratocasters have.
#30
I've been wondering about the Nighthawk but I don'lt know anyone who has one. $400 right now at Musician's Friend. But what the heck are those pickups it uses (besides the obvious visual cues)?
#31
Quote by baf250
That actually sounds like a really good option, thank you!

Now to search for some P-90s!
You really need to be careful about what you want here.

Someone suggested P-90s because you are looking for a single coil pickup, but I highly suggest you think about how a pickup sounds as opposed to whether it has one or two coils. The closest you are going to get to a Fender single coil sound is splitting a humbucker (and even that is not really close) and most humbuckers do not sound very good split because you end up getting very poor output out of a single humbucker coil.

And I really want to emphasize this. A p-90 les paul doesn't sound like a strat. It sounds like a p-90 les paul. They are something distinctly different than a strat or telecaster single coil. It sounds much closer to a humbucker les paul than a Fender. I don't suggest P-90s to people unless they are looking for a P-90 sound.

Take a listen for yourself:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H9ZvSrQ4jl4&feature=related (at 1:40)

vs.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6zJJ3Cyo8s&feature=related (at 3:04)

I marked those two times because he is using the neck pickup, pretty clean at those two times in the respective videos. It still sounds like a les paul, it still has that round sounding top end. A
Last edited by al112987 at May 10, 2011,
#32
Damn you parwui, after looking into the Nighthawk and seeing its awesomeness/price ratio I was dissapointed to find they dont make em left handed

Oh well, maybe Ill become proficient enough as a right handed player (going to teach myself the basics) to justify getting one.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#33
Quote by Spud Spudly
I've been wondering about the Nighthawk but I don'lt know anyone who has one. $400 right now at Musician's Friend. But what the heck are those pickups it uses (besides the obvious visual cues)?

Well, it's only been out for a couple of years now, and it's based on a Gibson model from the 90s(?) that was never very popular. The biggest flaw was that the stock pickups were not that great and you were shit outta luck if you wanted to replace them. That and it was trying to appeal to guitarists who were generally Fender players, and it cost twice as much as Fender's top of the line model at the time.

I'm not so sure what's up with the new ones, though.
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#35
Quote by baf250
I have tried both, and wish I could afford both, because they are totally different!

I feel like I'd be sacrificing either way. For the LP, I wouldn't be able to get that pure blues tone. The tele delivered the blues goods, but lacked for me in the rock area. If I liked strats this would be a little easier to choose haha.

EDIT: In response to the above, do you think the stock pickups will deal fine with blues? I've never played a real Les Paul, so I don't know if I'm missing out with Epi pickups.

You're joking right? A Les Paul has an awesome blues tone. Seriously. Roll the tone off all the way, neck pickup, guitar's volume all the way up, gain on your amp very low and volume all the way up (assuming valve ampness) and the EQ all about 5. Some light reverb works nicely too.
#36
Quote by coolstoryangus
I'm confused you cite SRV yet you're not interested in a strat?

I also cited Doug Aldrich, who gets a really awesome blues tone with his LP. But his guitar is worth more than I am. I also have 3 strat-bodied guitars now, and I'm sick of the shape. Point made below

@you all about my "pure blues" LP comment:
I feel you're failing to take into account my budget here. With an Epiphone LP Standard, I'm afraid I won't be able to get that awesome tone a real LP can deliver. If I had the budget to do all these mods to make it sound like a real Gibson, I'm sure I could nail that tone. Or better yet, get a real Gibson. But I cannot, and that's why I made that comment.

EDIT:

@paruwi: That's alot of bang for the buck! Thanks for bringing another guitar into the equation
Last edited by baf250 at May 10, 2011,
#37
Its still a les paul. When I was in college, I bought an Epiphone to keep with me at school. It was a solid guitar an it still sounded like a les paul for the most part. I never plugged it in and thought to myself, "Man, this sounds nothing like a real les paul should!" Side by side with my Gibson it didn't sound as good, but it got the job done for the most part. I had a set of decent pickups in there and never had much of a big issue.

Depending on what one's definition of a "real les paul" is, a lot of Gibsons won't even sound quite like a "real" one. There are folks on the les paul forum who think the historic reissues don't even sound like "real (ie. vintage)" les pauls because they don't use old growth wood.
Last edited by al112987 at May 10, 2011,
#38
I don't think you need to get trapped in the though of what is or isn't a 'pure blues tone.' My favourite guitar is my Fender Jazzmaster! It may not be the go-to for blues, but i love it. Blues is what you make it, and where you find your own tone!

I also have and Epi Les Paul, and it plays beautifully, it was actually my first guitar (when i started properly playing) and after i swapped the pickups in it for a Seymour Duncan '59 in the neck and a SD-4 JB in the bridge, it gets a great tone for blues! I find myself using the coil tap on the bridge pickup a lot, but i would definitely recommend the Epi. Like a lot of people have said already, back in the day a lot of blues players used Gibsons. They just give a great fat blues tone
#39
les paul would do the job but this tele would do it better


1972 reissue thin line semi hollow tele.

It comes with humbucjers. It will pretty much play everything you want including DRV style blues
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#40
Quote by WholeLottaIzzy
You're joking right? A Les Paul has an awesome blues tone. Seriously. Roll the tone off all the way, neck pickup, guitar's volume all the way up, gain on your amp very low and volume all the way up (assuming valve ampness) and the EQ all about 5. Some light reverb works nicely too.

This guy agrees http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CJ3fhLvd2TA&feature=feedu
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