#1
Im havin some trouble playing chords. i have multiple issues like muting strings and not being able to hit the intended strings, without hitting others. advice?
#2
Quote by Iblis92
Im havin some trouble playing chords. i have multiple issues like muting strings and not being able to hit the intended strings, without hitting others. advice?


practice every day
2009 Ibanez RG3EXFM1
2003 Ibanez RG220B
Line 6 Spider III 75
#4
both of these^

just practicing.... I assume you are new to guitar?

a bit of advice, the answer of "how do I (insert technique here) cleanly?" is always just "practice it".
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Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#5
Guys, I'd say ''practice every day'' is a bit of a given.

TS, when practicing chords individually, there are a few approaches you can take to ensure clean, articulated notes across all strings being played at the given time.

One thing I advocate with my students and friends of mine is to fret a trouble chord, and pick each string individually, listening out for any strings that aren't ringing out as clearly as the others. From here, you can narrow down the subtle changes in your posture that can really improve your comfortability with the instrument.
For example, let's say one of your trouble chords is Em. If your complication is that the underside of your fretting fingers mute the string(s) above, a very subtle curving of your fingers - and incidentally, using more of the tip when fretting rather than the pad - can prevent the underside from dampening those higher strings. Also be sure to not allow the palm of your fretting end to be in contact with the neck, kind of like a baseball - it'll do a lot of good to allow that little ''pocket of air'' between your hand and the neck, which will improve dexterity, freedom of movement, reduce tension and overall make the experience of playing guitar that much better.

On the contrary, let's say we're having trouble with a C major chord, which omits the low E from being strummed. Fret the chord and apply the same method above, trying to achieve each note ringing clearly.
From here, there are two main practice methods you can use to ensure that the low E isn't strummed:
1. Pay attention to your right hand, monitoring its movement. Hover your pick above the fifth string, and strum downward. Take some time between strums to allow your picking hand into position, and repeat - you'll have this down in no time! You may be tempted to speed up, but try to stick to a very comfortable for a little while after a few consecutively successful attempts.
2. When playing chords, it isn't uncommon the have the thumb rest gently on the side of the neck, and it's also common practice to use this lonesome character to mute your lowest string; resting the thumb's tip/slight pad upon the low E can be an effective muting tool, allowing for an easier strumming style once it's comfortable. To practice this, fret your C chord as you usually (sticking to the example), and check where your thumb is - is it right near the low E by default? If so, some very slight adjustment can employ the thumb to great use as a mute. You essentially just want to lightly touch the string, without fretting or enforcing any extraneous force on the string. You may even like to continually pick the low E while adjusting your thumb's angle, direction and so on, to find the optimal position while remaining comfortable and natural.
I'd still recommend strumming a chord like C or D major while targetting the appropriate strings to improve your accuracy and versatility, but this extra mute is a great touch.

I really hope this post helps out at all, and please don't hesitate to ask me to clarify anything I've written.

All the best,

Last edited by juckfush at May 12, 2011,
#6
take it slow practice individual chords and one you get them down practice changing chords really work on getting the fingering down and hitting the write notes. If your new dont worry it will come over time just dont give up practice everyday soon it will be second nature
#7
Quote by juckfush

TS, when practicing chords individually, there are a few approaches you can take to ensure clean, articulated notes across all strings being played at the given time....


I'm a guitar teacher too so I think about these issues a lot. Totally agree with your answer here. I was getting ready to write a very similar response but it looks like you've got it covered!
#8
What I did to learn chords that were difficult when I started was to do a chord-matching approach. One week I would pick an open G chord and find the barred G (355433) and go back and forth between the two. It eventually became something I did with every chord and soon I extended it to more difficult chords (diminished, etc) and after a solid year I was proud to say that I could nail the fretboard.

There is always a technique to everything but in time you will need to spend hours of practicing developing the muscle memory.
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