#1
What does it mean to exactly "analyze" a solo? What do you specifically look for?
Interval steps, notes, or...?

Also, I've learn the Major/Minor scale all up and down the neck, would the harmonic minor be the next to go learn?
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#2
Quote by unicornfist
What does it mean to exactly "analyze" a solo? What do you specifically look for?
Interval steps, notes, or...?

Also, I've learn the Major/Minor scale all up and down the neck, would the harmonic minor be the next to go learn?

What does it matter?
If I were asked to analyse a solo for a music theory question, I'd probably make note of sustained/short notes, accents, any harmonisation, intervals, steps/leaps, tonality, whether there are any techniques used (tremolo picking, tapping, sweeping, etc.)

The same thing you do with analysing any other section of music.


Learn whatever you want to. I'm pretty sure I learnt harmonic minor after those two, but y'know... Learn whatever.
#3
You ever sightread before? It's similar just check out what key its in, dynamics, what scale is being used, stuff like that and if you have to, just learn it measure by measure.

I like to figure out what scale its using and just use their general idea and throw my own twists in it
"[Bleach] is mostly water, and we are mostly water, therefore we are bleach"

I feel we should go to...

Purple Alert
Last edited by soulsablaze at May 11, 2011,
#4
Look at what notes they play over each chord to see how they approach that chord. Pay attention to the rhythm of the notes they use, etc....
#6
Quote by unicornfist
What does it mean to exactly "analyze" a solo? What do you specifically look for?
Interval steps, notes, or...?

Also, I've learn the Major/Minor scale all up and down the neck, would the harmonic minor be the next to go learn?


You can analyze just about anything you want... your imagination and ability to ask questions is the the only limit.

You can study the musicans tone, dynamics, phrasing, spacing, technique, articulation, dynamics, rhythm, emotion, a certin scales they prefer, ect... the list is truly endless. And when you start to study the relationship between all of those things and how the musican blends them thats when you start to get into voicing and what makes that specific musican unique.

For example... as I'm listening to "Blue in Green" by Miles Davis. One of the first things I notice is how he phrases his lines. And how he uses quite a bit of space, and how he plays with a very somber feel. I also noticed how he uses his dynamics and plays softly but very clear and articulate when he has something he really wants you to hear. Then after he grabs your attention, he gets a little bit louder, and his tone changes with the change in dynamics. After he gets your full undivided attention and you really start to feel what he's playing. At around 2:00 he stops playing entirly for almost 30 seconds which gives you a chance to process what he just played. Then after that space, when he knows he has your full attention and that your really thinking about what he just did. He comes back with a brighter tone, and incresses his dynamics just a bit, but he also tweaks his phrasing and he uses shorter spacing between those prhases.Those are just a few things I noticed in the first half of the song...

Hell on youtube one guy named "Guitaristman0014" posted this.

"For some reason, this conjures up an image of a big city in the middle of winter, late at night. Snow lazily drifting to the ground, streetlights dimly reflecting off of the snow drifts on the side of the street. Only a handful of cars are still driving, and a few people are walking home, bundled up in huge coats. All this framed by huge skyscrapers, lights still glowing in their windows. Beautiful."

Thats the fun thing, we all interpret the same peice of music diffrently... I was looking at the thechnical aspects of what he was playing, Guitaristman0014 saw an image of what he was playing... neither is right or wrong just diffrent ways of analyzing it
Quote by MetlHed94



Well played, sir, well played.
Last edited by TheMooseKnuckle at May 11, 2011,
#7
it depends. melodic ideas and phrasing (what derives from what) and harmonic ideas (how does this note relate to the chord behind it) are usually what i look at.
also, listen to the guy above me.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)
#8
Quote by unicornfist
Also, I've learn the Major/Minor scale all up and down the neck, would the harmonic minor be the next to go learn?


that depends on whether you know every note on the fretboard and the notes in every major/minor scale.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#9
Usually I'll start by determining the key of the song, and how the solo uses the associated scale with it. I also pay close attention to which notes the guitarist plays over certain chords and themes that they may focus on during their solo.

It's basically focusing on more "why" they chose to play a certain note, more than "what" note they play.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#10
Quote by AlanHB
Usually I'll start by determining the key of the song, and how the solo uses the associated scale with it. I also pay close attention to which notes the guitarist plays over certain chords and themes that they may focus on during their solo.

It's basically focusing on more "why" they chose to play a certain note, more than "what" note they play.


Ah, alright. This was more of what kinda answer I was looking for.
But everyone elses posts were helpful, too. especially, TheMooseKnuckles. Thanks guys.

@AeolianWolf
I know all the notes of the fret board but I don't remember like some who site reads does.
And I don't know every notes that in specific major/min scales (I know a few and could find these others in a matter of seconds) and can play them on the fret board when ever.
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Last edited by unicornfist at May 12, 2011,
#11
Quote by unicornfist

@AeolianWolf
I know all the notes of the fret board but I don't remember like some who site reads does.
And I don't know every notes that in specific major/min scales (I know a few and could find these others in a matter of seconds) and can play them on the fret board when ever.


That's what you need to know. If you don't know this, then you don't "know" them as to be actually useful for what you are looking to do, you can "find" them, but you can't know them.

Start there. Learn the neck so you can use it in real time. That's the only way. Now you know..

Best,

Sean
#12
Quote by Sean0913
That's what you need to know. If you don't know this, then you don't "know" them as to be actually useful for what you are looking to do, you can "find" them, but you can't know them.

Start there. Learn the neck so you can use it in real time. That's the only way. Now you know..

Best,

Sean


he beat me there.

long story short -- if you don't know the notes in the scale, you don't really know the scale. it's that simple.

just because you can play it doesn't mean you know it. if i gave you something to read in italian, you could probably pronounce it reasonably well, but it doesn't mean you have half an idea what it means.

if you speak italian, substitute any language that uses the latin alphabet that you don't know.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#13
Quote by Sean0913
That's what you need to know. If you don't know this, then you don't "know" them as to be actually useful for what you are looking to do, you can "find" them, but you can't know them.

Start there. Learn the neck so you can use it in real time. That's the only way. Now you know..

Best,

Sean


So learn every note in the Minor and Major keys and remember them....?
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#14
Quote by AeolianWolf
he beat me there.

long story short -- if you don't know the notes in the scale, you don't really know the scale. it's that simple.

just because you can play it doesn't mean you know it. if i gave you something to read in italian, you could probably pronounce it reasonably well, but it doesn't mean you have half an idea what it means.

if you speak italian, substitute any language that uses the latin alphabet that you don't know.


That's a good example, haha.

So just learn and remember the notes for each? I know the basic construction and some of the chords you harmonize with them.
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#16
Quote by Sean0913
Yep, and every note on the neck.

Best,

Sean


Now about the notes on the neck, can you explain a little more about this?
Should I remember every note so if some says play a D# or some other note I instantly, with out even really thinking about can go to it, or the same situation but it'll take like 1 second.

Edit: That was dumb, I don't think what I typed made any sense.
Current Gear:
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Robert Smith custom Jazzmaster
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Last edited by unicornfist at May 12, 2011,
#17
Quote by unicornfist
Now about the notes on the neck, can you explain a little more about this?
Should I remember every note so if some says play a D# or some other note I instantly, with out even really thinking about can go to it, or the same situation but it'll take like 1 second.

Edit: That was dumb, I don't think what I typed made any sense.


ideally, yes -- but this won't come easy. it requires a lot of conscious effort. but that's a skill musicians should have - knowledge of their instrument.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#18
Quote by unicornfist
Now about the notes on the neck, can you explain a little more about this?
Should I remember every note so if some says play a D# or some other note I instantly, with out even really thinking about can go to it, or the same situation but it'll take like 1 second.


Lol, if someone plays a D# and you instantly know it's a D# without any other refrence thats called perfect/absolute pitch. Unless your name is Ludwig van Beethoven "which is why he could compose despite being deaf" or your an Autistic Savant it's probably never going to happen.

But with training you can get your ear to the point where you can usually get pretty close most of the time.
Quote by MetlHed94



Well played, sir, well played.
Last edited by TheMooseKnuckle at May 12, 2011,
#19
Quote by TheMooseKnuckle
Lol, if someone plays a D# and you instantly know it's a D# thats called perfect/absolute pitch. Unless your name is Ludwig van Beethoven "which is why he could compose despite being deaf" or your an Autistic Savant it's probably never going to happen.

But with training you can get your ear to the point where you can usually get pretty close most of the time.


i think he meant that if someone were to ask him to play a D# on the guitar, that he'd be able to do it instantly.

if this is what you meant, though, TS, then i take back what i said. you don't need to have absolute pitch. you're only going to need knowledge of your instrument.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#20
Quote by AeolianWolf
i think he meant that if someone were to ask him to play a D# on the guitar, that he'd be able to do it instantly.

if this is what you meant, though, TS, then i take back what i said. you don't need to have absolute pitch. you're only going to need knowledge of your instrument.


No you knew what I meant the first time.
Anyways thanks guys, I'm gonna start working on what was told to me here, thanks.
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#21
Quote by AeolianWolf
i think he meant that if someone were to ask him to play a D# on the guitar, that he'd be able to do it instantly.

if this is what you meant, though, TS, then i take back what i said. you don't need to have absolute pitch. you're only going to need knowledge of your instrument.


Nodoubt... knowing all the notes on the fretboard saves a ton of headache later.

He may not ever get perfect pitch but relative pitch is still great, and something anyone can train their ear to. It's the ability to identify the intervals between given tones.
Quote by MetlHed94



Well played, sir, well played.
Last edited by TheMooseKnuckle at May 12, 2011,
#22
Quote by TheMooseKnuckle
Nodoubt... knowing all the notes on the fretboard saves a ton of headache later.

He may not ever get perfect pitch but relative pitch is still great, and something anyone can train their ear to. It's the ability to identify the intervals between given tones.

I'm already training my relative pitch.
Current Gear:
Mexican Fender Telecaster
Robert Smith custom Jazzmaster
Stratocaster
Vox AC4TV