#1
Hey forum,

I was just wondering if any can give me a good source where I can learn about electronics as they relate to guitars and amps and speakers and such. I know nothing about ohms, of fuses, or how pickups works, but I'd like to learn so someday I can do some of my own repairs if necessary. Personal lectures/advice is great, but I'm also looking for books that would explain this topic to me, but I've checked on various music sites and had no luck finding any. Maybe I'm just bad at searching for things. At any rate, any help would be greatly appreciated! Thanks so much!
#2
how deep do you want to go?

some of dave hunter's books are really good if you're only looking to understand guitar etc. a bit better, but they don't go too far into electronics. But they're a good base for then going for actual electronics books, and will give you a lot of advice regarding guitar gear.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#3
Thanks you Dave_Mc! I'll definitely be looking into these books! Do you or anyone else know about any good online sources where I can start learning for free?
#4
ah...

geofex has some good stuff.

aiken amps page has some technical articles which are good.

18watt forums (and its offshoots) have some good info

that's just off the top of my head, there are probably a bunch of other good sites I haven't thought of.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#5
The stuff you listed cover a broad range, you can figure how a guitar pickup works with basic E+M physics and Faraday's law of induction. Learning about amps is delving more into electronics. I second Dave's suggestion for Dave Hunter's books. They're easy to understand and entertaining and he doesn't overwhelm you with technicalities. He talks more like a guitarist and less like an engineer which is a good thing. Basic electronics priming can be found on the internet (how to read a circuit diagram, what different components do, etc.)

http://www.amazon.com/How-Service-Your-Own-Tube/dp/0962817007

^That would probably be the best place to start with though.
Last edited by al112987 at May 11, 2011,
#6
I studied electrical engineering in school but when I graduated I was still a noob. What really helped me learn real world stuff was purchasing a Microcontroller evaluation board (Atmel STK500). You could try to follow the lectures/labs from Cornell:

http://people.ece.cornell.edu/land/courses/ece4760/

Yeah I doubt you'd use a microcontroller for any guitar electronics, but you'll learn about power supplies, analog, digital, capacitors (why and how to use them), resistors, etc.

You could also try to follow this application note to learn more about audio related stuff:

http://www.atmel.com/dyn/resources/prod_documents/doc1456.pdf

Oh, and I'd suggest learning about op amps before you start learning about transistors/tubes. It's easy to get lost in a lot of transistor theory of operation once you start getting deeper.
Last edited by farmosh203 at May 11, 2011,
#7
I was at GC the other day and saw a book about amp and guitar repair/maintenance in the shelf. I glanced through it and would recommend it as a good guide for someone who wants to learn this stuff. I think this might be it....

http://www.guitarcenter.com/Hal-Leonard-The-Complete-Guide-to-Guitar-and-Amp-Maintenance-Book-100322430-i1156582.gc
#8
Quote by al112987
I second Dave's suggestion for Dave Hunter's books. They're easy to understand and entertaining and he doesn't overwhelm you with technicalities. He talks more like a guitarist and less like an engineer which is a good thing.


Yeah.

The only thing I'd say is he seems to have something against modern high gain amps (and more generally even modern high gain tones)- and lets this bias come across into his books (where, if you ask me, he should be at least trying to be objective).

Aside from that, though, they're very good. Some are better than others, though. The best ones are probably his tube amp handbook and effects handbook.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?