#1
It seems to be the upper half of the rear of the neck that causes it. What could be the issue here? The guitar is perfectly intonated?
yep
#2
it sounds like there could be a spkit in the neck. maybe?
or the rod inside is damaged.

or maybe it's you being to forcful or unconciesly tense and pulling on it.

if you know someone else that plays guitar get them to have a bash on it. if it does the same thing it's the guitar and you need to take it to get fixed

i could be wrong though
#3
You probably have the truss rod set quite weak or it's an older single truss rod design. You're gripping or pulling the back of the neck too hard so you're pulling it back, straightening it slightly and pulling the strings sharp. The lower strings noticably change pitch slightly faster than the thinner ones, you may notice this when tuning up that the lower strings reach tune in fewer turns and the slightest half turn more can send them way off. This is why your lowest two strings are sounding that little bit sharp and the other four aren't sounding different, although if you check on an accurate tuner you'll find they are going up slightly too.

Don't grip the neck with so much force and check to see if your neck has too much relief, if it does then you can afford to tighten the truss rod very slightly. Gripping the neck more loosely is your main fix either way.
#4
Quote by grohl1987
You probably have the truss rod set quite weak or it's an older single truss rod design. You're gripping or pulling the back of the neck too hard so you're pulling it back, straightening it slightly and pulling the strings sharp. The lower strings noticably change pitch slightly faster than the thinner ones, you may notice this when tuning up that the lower strings reach tune in fewer turns and the slightest half turn more can send them way off. This is why your lowest two strings are sounding that little bit sharp and the other four aren't sounding different, although if you check on an accurate tuner you'll find they are going up slightly too.

Don't grip the neck with so much force and check to see if your neck has too much relief, if it does then you can afford to tighten the truss rod very slightly. Gripping the neck more loosely is your main fix either way.



Okay, thanks for the advice. It does seem that the truss rod could be tightened a little. I should turn it slightly clockwise for this occasion right?
yep
#5
Yes. As with all things, turning it clockwise tightens, anti-clockwise loosens. You want to down-tune the strings slightly, about one full step or so, tighten the truss rod by about 1/8th to 1/4 of a full turn, tune back up to your usual tuning and check the relief again. Keep going until the relief measures right, about 0.3-0.5mm is correct relief for most guitars. Thicker strings need more relief so if you use more than a regular .10-.46 set you might want to make sure the relief is between 0.5mm and 0.7mm
#6
The relief is correct, but the issue is still occuring. The guitar is about a week old and I just changed the strings today. Any other ideas anyone?

Edit: It seems to only happen when I fret some of the strings. I suppose it must be the extra tension in the neck? How can I fix this?
yep
Last edited by kaneorsomething at May 12, 2011,
#7
Aren't you simply pressing too hard on the strings ?

I used to play on a crappy acoustic with bad fretwork where I really had to press down on the strings to get them to ring out properly. When I went over to electric, I found the pitch to be quite sharp compared to what I was used to. Tried to lessen the pressure from my fingertips, the notes went to their proper pitch again.

Had the same when I got my second electric, which has jumbo frets, but it didn't take long before I got used to it.
#8
I recorded myself playing normally and it seems like the problem only occurs if I try and replicate it...therefore I suppose it's a non-issue. Thanks for advice and I guess I'm good to go!
yep
#9
Okay, I was wrong and this is still an issue. I'd like to believe it's the tuner but it isn't. If I fret the guitar at all, the pitch changes. The action is perfectly set up. The strings have been changed, the guitar is brand new. I'm using a standard string gauge. What is going on?
yep
#10
intonation, maybe?
Quote by pedromiles101
you're not gonna want to take a dump in a gross, off-colored, vintage toilet. you want something that is white and pearly; something that shines. something that you can put your cheeks against and say, "f*** yeah"
#11
All guitars will change pitch if you start tugging or pushing on the neck, I can do it with all my guitars, my strat is kinda sensitive to it if I'm sitting down, cause I tend to put more pressure on the neck when I sit to keep it from flopping over.

If it's really bad, like, you can't touch the neck without it changing pitch, you might want to tighten your truss rod a bit, but if it's doing it after applying a decent amount of force on the neck, then I wouldn't worry about it, just be more careful in your playing.
#12
I dunno, if I fret the neck AT ALL, there is a pitch change. If I tighten my truss rod any more I will get fret buzz from contact. I thought maybe I'd put the neck screws in at an angle (I have to remove it for truss rod changes) but it's fine. Very confusing.
yep