#1
Basically, I play Thrash and death metal and I can solo really fast on some guitars, but not at all on others. Out of all the guitars in my possession, including a Jackson RR3 Rhoads with a floyd rose bridge. that has been set up at a guitar shop, I do not own one guitar that I can play fast on. It's only on a few guitars owned by my friends or my school that I can solo fast on.

I don't know much about action and setting up guitars, but there seems to be poles, topped by screws in the bridges of all my guitars, and I was wondering if I adjusted these would it do anything to help me play faster?

Thanks for your help guys
#2
Well, lowering the action of the strings (you know what it is?) will help a lot for some people, while other as me play extremely more fast with a high action.
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#3
Low action means you can fret a note faster and easier as the distance from string to neck is smaller. Take your guitar to a shop and say you want it as low as you can without buzz and try it out. I guarantee it will feel better.
#4
How high you have your action set is dependent upon what type of music you play, and how hard your pick attack is. The way your guitar is set up is dependent upon what you like, and can be different from person to person. Set ups you will get with a guitar out of the box, and at local music shops, are usually a generic setup. Your specific setup is specific to what you play, and how you play. I personally keep my truss rod at 0.010" give or take depending on fretboard radius. You said you like to play shred type stuff which means you probably have a larger fretboard radius and should probably aim for about 0.008". With that spec I then set my action to a little more than the thickness of a dime off of the top of the 17th fret. Thats what I prefer, however it may be different for you. If you are having issues with the Floyd Rose then you should checkout the Ultimate Set Up thread, it has everything you could ever want to know about setting up a tremolo in it. I would find it for you but I'm too lazy. Hope this helps.
My Guitars
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#5
There is no set rule. Lower action will make the guitar easier to play and intonate higher up the neck better.

But it isn't nessesary. You don't NEED to have low action if you're a good player. A good player can make a guitar sound good regardless of how high the action is. But you might WANT low action. But having low action can cause fret buzz. You need to find that happy medium between low action and little fret buzz, which varies from guitar to guitar.

Here's a good setup guide on Floyd Rose trems. No offence, but it suprises me that you have an RR3, which has a liscenced floyd, but you have no idea how to set your guitar up.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=614226&highlight=floyd+rose+setup

EDIT: You raise/lower the action on a floyd by raising/lowering the studs that the bridge pivots on. But whatever you do, NEVER move these studs when your guitar has string tension on it. The friction of rotating the studs against the knife edges will damage the knife edges and the floyd will never stay in tune again. If you're gonna rotate the action studs, take off ALL string tension and remove the trem springs. It is time-consuming, but that is the nature of having a floyd rose. They are time consuming to set up.
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#7
Quote by kerkhammet
Do you guys think the gauge of the strings is gonna make a difference? I got 10's on there


Depends, what tuning do you play in?
#8
It will do. Different gauge strings require you to adjust the tremolo springs to suit the gauge. The heavier the string gauge, the more spring tension you need. I find that thicker strings will need slightly higher action purely because the strings are physically bigger. But it also depends on what tuning you use. If your strings are loose, you will need to raise the action to compensate for the loose strings rattling against the fret wires, causing fret buzz.
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#10
Quote by kerkhammet
e flat


Your string tension will be fairly moderate then. String tension depends on the gauge, the tuning and the scale length. Eb with 10's on a 25.5'' scale guitar souldn't give you problems concerning tension. Just as long as you know what you are doing when you set the guitar up, you shouldn't run into problems.
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#11
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE


Here's a good setup guide on Floyd Rose trems. No offence, but it suprises me that you have an RR3, which has a liscenced floyd, but you have no idea how to set your guitar up.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=614226&highlight=floyd+rose+setup


Putting the same gauge strings on a LFR is sort of a setup in that you have to know how to do it.

One of my friends has been playing a long time 15 years.

He just doesn't like to mess with the tuss rod.

He takes he his favorite guitar to the luthier who made it if anything gets out of wack.

I'm the one who setup his other guitars.

He knows how to check intonation if something gets out of wack. It becomes somebody else's problem.
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